The March Issue of Administrative Science Quarterly is Now Online!

February 5, 2016 by

ASQ CoverThe March issue of Administrative Science Quarterly is now available and can be read online for free for the next 30 days. The March issue includes a diverse group of articles, including an article reviewing how distributed attention and shared emotions contributed to the downfall of Nokia, and an article reflecting on how specializing in investment banking may lead to negative returns for MBA graduates.

The lead article, “60th Anniversary Essay: Ruminations on How We Became a Mystery House and How We Might Get Out” from Stephen R. Barley celebrates Administrative Science Quarterly‘s 60th anniversary  and details the current state of research in organizational theory.

The abstract from the paper:

This essay responds to, largely concurs with, and extends the concerns Jerry Davis expressed in his June 2015 editorial essay in ASQ about the state of research in organizational theory. In particular, it discusses the reasons novelty has become such a valued commodity in organizational theory and its unintended consequences. Fault lies with the way students are trained, the reward system that most universities implicitly or explicitly use to promote faculty, and the role that editors and reviewers play in wittingly or unwittingly rewarding the quest for novelty in the peer-review process. One way to revitalize organization theory while also addressing such problems would be for the researchers to begin to focus on the myriad ways that organizations shape our society and for organizational theorists to begin to collaborate with engineers and researchers in schools of public policy who are more aware of and interested in addressing problems that organizations, especially profit-making firms, create as they seek to shape their own environments.

Click here to access the table of contents for the March 2016 issue of Administrative Science Quarterly. Want to know about all the latest from Administrative Science Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Old Stress, New Stress, Bad Stress, Eustress: Challenging Employees with Positive Organizational Stress

February 4, 2016 by

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[We’re pleased to welcome Wendy Becker of Shippensburg University. Dr. Becker recently published an article in Human Resource Development Review with co-authors M. Blake Hargrove of Shippensburg University and Debra Hargrove of Dickinson College, entitled “The HR Eustress Model: Creating Work Challenge Through Positive Stress.”]

  • What inspired you to be interested in this topic?

We find the negative focus on organizational stress disturbing.  Stress is a normal and oftentimes positive part of life within any organization.  In this article we attempt to help HR professionals harness the positive possibilities of workplace stress.   We also offer a theoretical framework for researchers to explore.

  • Were there findings that were surprising to you?

We introduce a new phrase–“positive HRD”–that seeks to promote positive organizations by developing opportunities to challenge employees. We provide a theoretical framework to explore the possibilities of positive organizational stress.

  • How do you see this study influencing future research and/or practice?

HR and HRD professionals will find this article helpful in two ways:  (1)  we provide a theoretical explanation for the efficacy of existing HR practices, and (2)  we point out specific interventions that can help create improved performance, improved worker well-being, and other important positive organizational and individual outcomes.

HR and HRD researchers can use this theoretical model as a basis for future empirical investigations.  This article can serve as a launching point for future explorations of “positive HRD.”

The abstract for the paper:

Building on existing conceptualizations of stress, we present a model that provides an alternate explanation of the efficacy of human resource development (HRD) interventions. Unlike most stress research that emphasizes the negative side of stress, we view eustress—good stress—as a positive individual and organizational outcome. The HRD eustress model extends theory from the positive psychology and positive organizational behavior literature and positions a role for HRD in creating positive stress as a means to improve performance. We describe how HRD professionals can help challenge employees as a means of attaining individual goals and personal development.

You can read “The HR Eustress Model: Creating Work Challenge Through Positive Stress” from Human Resource Development Review free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Human Resource Development Review? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!


 

M. Blake HargroveM. Blake Hargrove is associate professor of Management in the John L. Grove College of Business at Shippensburg University. His research interests include positive organizational behavior, scale development, and applied business ethics. He holds a PhD from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Wendy Becker

Wendy S. Becker is professor of Management, Shippensburg University. Research interests include experiential learning and the efficacy of workplace interventions, as well as managerial development and motivation theory. She received the Award for Innovative Excellence in Teaching, Learning, and Technology from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning and she is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

Debra HargroveDebra F. Hargrove is associate vice president for Human Resources Services at Dickinson College. She has dedicated her career to make the organizations in which she serves better places for all employees. She has been an HR practitioner for more than twenty years, holds an MA in Human Resources, and earned the Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) designation.

Family Business Review Call for Proposals: 2nd Review Issue

February 3, 2016 by

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Family Business Review is now accepting proposals for their 2nd Review Issue through March 1, 2016. The issue will be guest edited by Daniel Holt of Mississippi State University, Tyge Payne of Texas Tech University, Allison W. Pearson of Mississippi State University, and Pramodita Sharma of University of Vermont.

From the Call for Proposals:

We invite authors to submit proposals for the 2nd Review Issue of Family Business Review. Launched in 1988, Family Business Review is an interdisciplinary scholarly forum publishing conceptual, theoretical and empirical research that aims to advance the understanding of family enterprise around the world.

The goal of the FBR Review Issue is to provide a retrospective of research conducted in family business studies and to guide future areas 391746644_6a462b0805_zin their development. Articles in this issue will critically examine gaps between ‘what we know’ and ‘what we need to know’ concerning key topics and methods of interest to family business scholars. A multitude of review topics would be appropriate for this special issue but a key criterion is that they help build knowledge for family business scholars while contributing to sister disciplines.

We welcome a wide range of critical reviews on topics and methods. Each review must be comprehensive, summarizing research to date, and suggesting interesting research questions for family business scholars. In addition to reviews on topics typically found in the pages of FBR and other leading journals within management / business that publish family business research, we encourage reviews of topics and methods that are integral for family enterprises but not yet found in management / business journals. Examples might include research on addiction, risk, community, kinship, philanthropy, discontinuities vs. continuities, longevity, process-based research, cross-cultural research, trust and trustworthiness, practice-based research, socio-material perspectives, research on advising and advocacy, finance and financing issues, family dynamics, roles and relationships that influence business decisions.

You can read the full Call for Proposals here. Authors interested in submitting proposals are encouraged to review the selected editorials and review articles on the Family Business Review website. In addition, prospective authors may be interested in reading “The Art of Writing a Review Article” published in the December 2009 issue of Journal of Managementwhich can be read free for the next two weeks here.

To submit a proposal, go to the Family Business Review submission manager. In the submission manager, be sure to mark the manuscript type of your submission “2nd Review Issue.” Submissions for the 2nd Review Issue should be single-spaced and up to 3 pages long. Additional pages for references, tables and appendices may be included, but the complete proposal should not exceed 10 pages total. Questions should be directed to any member of the 2nd Review Issue guest editors.

Want to know about all of the latest news and research from Family Business Review? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

* Pen image credited to new1mproved (CC)

Diversify and Conquer: An Argument for Reinvigorating Marketing Science with Behavioral Science and Humanities

February 2, 2016 by

[We’re pleased to welcome Gerald Zaltman of Harvard Business School and Olson Zaltman Associates. Dr. Zaltman recently published an article in Cornell Hospitality Quarterly with co-authors Jerry Olson and James Forr of Olson Zaltman Associates, entitled “Toward a New Marketing Science for Hospitality Managers.”]

In “Toward a New Marketing Science for Hospitality Managers,” published in the Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, Jerry Olson, James Forr, and I point out that much of CQ_57_1_Cover.inddmarketing research and a great deal of marketing thought and action is influenced by the ideas and methods of an old marketing science.  We argue that a New Marketing Science is needed in which scientifically sound ideas and methods from the behavioral sciences and humanities are integrated around a coherent scientific perspective.  We feel this is especially important since life in the marketplace is experienced holistically and not in the silo like ways that companies, universities, and specific professions are organized.

Although current marketing does explore new ideas and methods, including neuro/biometric methods and big data approaches, these ideas are often treated piecemeal — used in isolation or as independent add-ons to more traditional work.  In contrast, we advocate integrating the best ideas and approaches from diverse fields to develop a new marketing science.  In “Toward a New Marketing Science” we focus on how key ideas from the mind sciences can produce a deeper and richer understanding of the minds of customers and also the minds of managers.  Other fields containing equally exciting marketing related advances include, linguistics, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, ethnomusicology, and art therapy, to name a few.

We provide four examples of applying a New Marketing Science approach to create emotionally resonant hospitality experiences.  However, the principles of a NMS can be applied to any marketing problem in any industry.  Practicing the NMS requires bold, imaginative thinking that goes beyond simple borrowing of ideas and imitation of best practices.

The abstract:

A New Marketing Science (NMS) is proposed that can dramatically improve a firm’s marketplace performance. The NMS challenges managers to dare to think and act differently. It generates deep insights into the thoughts and actions of both customers and managers and how the two mind-sets interact. As several examples illustrate, it departs from the “old” marketing science by its emphasis on imagination, knowing how and why a practice works, understanding the total customer experience, and focus on effectiveness over efficiency. The NMS is grounded in principles from the behavioral sciences and humanities such as the importance of the unconscious mind, the way mental frames serve as interpretative lenses, the centrality of emotions, the reconstructive nature of memory, and the importance of metaphor for learning about and influencing choices.

You can read “Toward a New Marketing Science for Hospitality Managers” from Cornell Hospitality Quarterly free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Cornell Hospitality Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!


 
Gerald ZaltmanGerald Zaltman is Founding partner in Olson Zaltman Associates and the Joseph C. Wilson Professor of Business Administration Emeritus at Harvard Business School, where he also was co-director of The Mind of the Market Laboratory. He has authored over 20 books including: How Customers Think: Essential Insights into the Mind of the Market and Marketing Metaphoria: What Deep Metaphors Reveal about the Minds of Consumers.

Jerry OlsonJerry Olson is Founding Partner in Olson Zaltman Associates and Professor Emeritus at Penn State University’s Smeal College of Business where he was Earl P. Strong Professor of Marketing and Department Chair. He has published more than 60 papers on these topics in conference proceedings and academic journals , including Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research, and Journal of Marketing.

James ForrJames Forr is a director at Olson Zaltman Associates. He has led projects for Fortune 100 clients including IBM, Bank of America, PepsiCo, and P&G along with non-profit and public sector clients such as the AFL-CIO and the Funeral Service Foundation.  He also has led two projects that have helped clients win prestigious Ogilvy Awards from the Advertising Research Foundation.

 

William H. Starbuck on How Journals Can Improve Research Practices in Social Sciences

February 1, 2016 by

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This year marks the 60th Anniversary of Administrative Science Quarterly, presenting an opportunity to not only celebrate the success of the journal and anticipate the promise of what the future holds, but also an opportunity to reflect on areas where the editorial process could be improved. In his essay, “60th Anniversary Essay: How Journals Could Improve Research Practices in Social Science,” published in the Administrative Science Quarterly, William H. Starbuck considers some imperfect properties of current editorial practices and methodology in the social sciences.

ASQ CoverThe abstract from his essay:

This essay proposes ways to improve editorial evaluations of manuscripts and to make published research more reliable and trustworthy. It points to troublesome properties of current editorial practices and suggests that editorial evaluations could become more reliable by making more allowance for reviewers’ human limitations. The essay also identifies some troublesome properties of prevalent methodology, such as statistical significance tests, HARKing, and p-Hacking, and proposes editorial policies to mitigate these detrimental behaviors.

You can read “60th Anniversary Essay: How Journals Could Improve Research Practices in Social Science” from Administrative Science Quarterly free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Administrative Science Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Gould Reading Room picture credited to eflon (CC)

Award-Winning Journal of Management Education Article on Learning-Inhibitory Introductory Textbooks

January 29, 2016 by

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Robert A. Snyder of Northern Kentucky University recently won the first Ruane National Prize for Innovation in Business Education for his article, “Let’s Burn Them All: Reflections on the Learning-Inhibitory Nature of Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior Textbooks,” which was published in the October 2014 issue of Journal of Management Education. Dr. Snyder also has a forthcoming book, The Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Leading Organizational Change, which will be released on March 12, 2016 by Taylor & Francis/Routledge.

The abstract for the award-winning article:

This essay provides evidence from the neurosciences that standard Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior textbooks may inhibit, rather than facilitate, learning of the basic concepts and the rudimentary knowledge-basis that underlie the complex skills business students should learn in subsequent coursework and that they must hone in practice as future managers. Specific introductory textbook limitations that are addressed include the following: (a) the nearly total absence of neuroscience findings that have important relevance and application to management and organizational behavior; (b) the ineffective manner in which theories are presented; (c) the use of idiosyncratic, academically derived, or simply spot-invented language; (d) the nonengaging manner in which information (generally speaking) is presented; and (e) the question of whether such textbooks are being read, much less studied. Based on my recent, joyous experience in not using such textbooks, I propose, for readers’ possible consideration, an alternative (hyperlink) practice that is (a) fully compatible with recent neuroscience research on management, learning, and information retention/retrieval and (b) likely to dramatically increase student engagement with assigned readings in Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior courses and their ability to retrieve content and apply it during class discussions.

You can read “Let’s Burn Them All: Reflections on the Learning-Inhibitory Nature of Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior Textbooks” from Journal of Management Education free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Journal of Management Education? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Is Value Creation from Human Connection an Area of Opportunity for Companies to Stand Out?

January 28, 2016 by

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Company executives believe they know the value of their product or service they provide, but the true judge of value comes from the customer’s perspective, which is constantly changing and shaped by every interaction, directly or indirectly, with a company. Customer perspective plays a large part in determining a company’s brand and the values the company stands for. It can impact how the employees of a company work collectively toward specific company values.

The number one reason customers leave a business feeling dissatisfied with their experience is poor customer service and indifferent customer representatives. As a result, customer service is an area that holds great potential for companies to really stand out from their competition.

In a marketplace with fewer competing companies, consumers have little choice as to JCVwhere they buy their goods. Companies can tell the customers that they provide a great service without actually following through with the promise—how easy for the companies! But now that companies face more competitors, companies no longer rule the marketplace. The consumer does. It does not matter how much value the company executives and employees think they are providing the customer. If the customer perceives that the value provided is lacking, then they can easily take their business to a competitor instead.

With the introduction of the Internet and web, information is readily available. Technology has changed the behavior of consumers overnight. That once-trusting ‘believer’ evolved into a very sophisticated ‘researcher,’ and the buying patterns of consumers are no longer as predictable, controllable or reliable as they have been.

When a company transforms into a customer-centric organization, a collective mindset emerges that prompts employees to strive for a positive customer experience and perception.  In every transaction between the customer and a company representative, value is always being created or destroyed! Positive value leaves the customer feeling better than before they interacted with a company and employee. Negative value leaves the customer feeling worse than before the interaction. Understanding customer perceptions is fundamental to facilitating positive customer value creation, and it is something every executives and employees alike should be aware of.

Click here to read the full article!

The abstract:

This article introduces an area of value creation seldom considered in the strategic sense in business: value creation from human connections. And given the number one reason for customers leaving a business is a feeling of indifference from a company representative; this is an area that holds a great opportunity for companies to really stand out from their competition. This article examines where business has come from, where we are now and why the critical need to revamp our way of thinking. When a company transforms into a customer-centric organization, a collective mindset to design for the desired outcome of customer emotion emerges.

Click here to read Human Connection: Uncharted Territory for Value Creation for free from the Journal of Creating Value.

Make sure to sign up for e-alerts and be notified of all the latest research from Journal of Creating Value.

*Market photo credited to the US Department of Agriculture (CC)

Book Review: Organizational Resilience: How Learning Sustains Organizations in Crisis, Disaster, and Breakdowns

January 27, 2016 by

Organizational Resilience Cover

D. Christopher Kayes: Organizational Resilience: How Learning Sustains Organizations in Crisis, Disaster, and Breakdowns. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. 171 pp. $59.95, hardcover.

Karl E. Weick of Ross School of Business recently reviewed the book in Administrative Science Quarterly. From the review:

Kayes has been a long-time, articulate student of experiential learning (e.g., 2002) and of dramatic instances when such learning falls short (e.g., 2004). Those strengths are evident again in this volume. The argument is developed along two dimensions: the environment is either routine or novel, and the operational orientation is either performance or learning. Of special interest are those situations in which a performance orientation in a routine environment shifts abruptly or gradually toward a requirement for ASQ_v60n4_Dec2015_cover.indda learning orientation in a novel environment. These shifts are often incomplete because factors such as preoccupation with goals, unwarranted optimism, and rational decision making make experiential learning more difficult and reinforce a performance orientation.

The author argues that many models of organizational failure (e.g., Janis, 1972; Reason, 1990; Perrow, 1999) are inadequate because they ignore how failing masks breakdowns and recoveries of learning. Because learning is a ‘‘naturally occurring process,’’ disruptions of that ongoing process contribute to disasters and make them worse.

You can read the full review from Administrative Science Quarterly by clicking here. Like what you read? Click here to sign up for e-alerts and have all the research and reviews like this sent directly to your inbox!

Good in Theory, Bad in Practice: Corporate Social Marketing in the Alcohol Industry

January 26, 2016 by

Green Margarita

Corporate social marketing (CSM) campaigns are used to improve the image of a wide variety of companies. Each CSM initiative is unique, but when it comes to companies in the alcohol industry, CSM campaigns seem to share a certain moral ambiguity. In sharp contrast to the other CSM initiatives, which demonstrate how an organization contributes positively to the community, similar campaigns for companies in the alcohol industry have drawn criticism for the way they promote “responsible drinking.” In their article, “Smokescreens and Beer Googles: How Alcohol Industry CSM Protects the Industry,” published in Social Marketing QuarterlySandra C. Jones of Australian Catholic University, Austin Wyatt of Swinburne University of Technology, and Mike Daube of McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Youth delve into why CSM campaigns for organizations in the alcohol industry can prove to be problematic, particularly for the community.

The abstract:

Corporate social marketing (CSM) is one of several initiatives companies can undertake to demonstrate their corporate social responsibility (CSR). While there are many motivations for CSR and CSM, all are linked to profit in some way, including promoting the reputation of the organization. While CSM is often seen as evidence of SMQ Jan 2016organizations making a contribution to their community, there are some industries whose CSM campaigns have drawn considerable controversy and criticism. This article discusses the role of the alcohol industry in developing and disseminating “responsible drinking” CSM activities. It discusses some of the problems identified with alcohol industry CSM campaigns—including evidence that industry education campaigns communicate ambiguous messages; improve public perceptions of the industry but do not discourage harmful or underage drinking; and divert attention from more effective approaches, such as controls on price and availability. The paper also addresses the issue of other CSM/CRM activities undertaken by the alcohol industry, such as encouraging consumers to purchase a brand by donating a proportion of the profits to health and social causes (including those that are exacerbated by alcohol consumption). It discusses the value of these activities for the industry and their potential negative impact on the health of the community. In summary, the evidence suggests that industry CSM and CRM activities protect the industry (from restrictive policies and declining sales) but may in fact be detrimental to the community.

You can read “Smokescreens and Beer Goggles: How Alcohol Industry CSM Protects the Industry” from Social Marketing Quarterly by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Social Marketing Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

A New Method for Judging the Quality of Experiential Learning

January 25, 2016 by

[We’re pleased to welcome Makoto Matsuo of Hokkaido University. Dr. Matsuo recently published an article entitled, “A Framework for Facilitating Experiential Learning,” in the December 2015 issue of Human Resource Development Review.]

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  • What inspired you to be interested in this topic?

Kolb’s (1984) Experiential Learning Model has been very popular and widely used in various research fields. However, I have never seen any literatures regarding the systematic models on facilitators of experiential learning, which made me very curious about knowing what kinds of individual capabilities that determine the quality of experiential learning, which has been known to have a strong impact on adult development.

  • Were there findings that were surprising to you?

Based on the Kolb’s Model, I developed the framework by integrating different perspectives in several research fields. The framework has a multilayered structure. That is, ‘learning goal orientation’ and ‘developmental network’ are fundamental elements, which influence three other factors: ‘setting difficult goal’, ‘critical reflection’, and ‘enjoyment of work’ in facilitating experiential learning. I must say that I have been amazed by my framework–both learning goal orientation and developmental network are equally weighed and no element supersedes another.

  • How do you see this study influencing future research and/or practice?

In theoretical viewpoint, the framework developed in this paper should be further examined with quantitative and qualitative research in the future. Practically, on the other hand, I truly believe that HRD managers will be able to apply this framework in leadership and management development.

You can read “A Framework for Facilitating Experiential Learning” from Human Resource Development Review free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Human Resource Development Review? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!



Makoto Matsuo

Makoto Matsuo is a professor at Hokkaido University. His interests are in experiential learning and human resource development.


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