Nothing Certain But Death and Taxes…

April 16, 2014 by

It’s unavoidable - tax day comes each year. As a reward and to celebrate the day “after,” we are pleased to offer an interdisciplinary collection of key articles on taxes and accounting, available free to access through May 31:

 

Can Encouragement from Parents Impact Children’s Interests in Math?

April 15, 2014 by

top-education-1-1029825-mIn 2009, President Obama launched the “Educate to Innovate” campaign, which called for a nationwide push to motivate students to reach a higher level of success in science, technology, engineering and math (i.e. “STEM”). Since then various educational programs – including even segments on Sesame Street – have been launched across the country in hopes of inspiring a love of STEM subjects in children. But how can encouragement from parents play a part in this movement? Marsha Ing investigated this idea in her article “Can Parents Influence Children’s Mathematics Achievement and Persistence in STEM Careers?” available now from the latest issue of the Journal of Career Development.

The abstract:

This study explores the relationship between parental motivational practices, Children’s mathematicsJCD_72ppiRGB_powerpoint achievement trajectories, and persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. Nationally representative longitudinal survey data were analyzed using latent growth curve analysis. Findings indicate that parents’ motivational practices influence their children’s mathematics achievement in terms of where the Children start in the 7th grade and how much mathematics achievement grows or changes through the 12th grade. Findings also indicate a positive relationship between mathematics-specific, intrinsically focused parental motivational practices and growth in mathematics achievement and persistence in STEM careers. These findings provide specific information about how different types of parental motivational practices influence long-term mathematics achievement and persistence in STEM careers.
Read “Can Parents Influence Children’s Mathematics Achievement and Persistence in STEM Careers?” from Journal of Career Development for free by clicking here. Want to get all the latest news from Journal of Career Development? Click here to sign up for e-alerts.

Could Smartphones Become a Teaching Tool?

April 14, 2014 by

hand-holding-mobile-smart-phone-1417191-mA quick internet search of “smartphone etiquette in class” will give you a fairly straightforward answer: don’t use your phone. But what if instructors could use smartphone technology to their advantage instead? A new article published in Business and Professional Communication Quarterly entitled “Multitasking With Smartphones in the College Classroom” examines the idea of using smartphones to help enhance students’ learning rather than interfere with it.

The abstract:

Although the concept of multitasking itself is under debate, smartphones do enable users to divert attention fromBPCQ.indd the task at hand to nongermane matters. As smartphone use becomes pervasive, extending into our classrooms, educators are concerned that they are becoming a major distraction. Does multitasking with smartphones impede learning? Can they be used to enhance learning instead? This article reviews current literature, provides suggestions for further investigation, and proposes an approach to incorporate smartphone multitasking in the classroom to enhance learning.
Click here to read “Multitasking With Smartphones in the College Classroom” for free from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly. Want to be the first to know about all the latest from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

 

Out of Whack: AQ, PQ, Miscue?

April 12, 2014 by

[We're pleased to reproduce Journal of Management Inquiry's "Out of Whack" by Charles M. Vance.]

OOW 114Read “Out of Whack” for free from the January 2014 issue of Journal of Management Inquiry by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest from Journal of Management Inquiry? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

A Focus on High-Quality Research

April 11, 2014 by

[Editor's Note: We are pleased to reproduce Michael LaTour's editorial from the most recent issue of Cornell Hospitality Quarterly.]

cqx coverMore than ever before, the quality of academic research is crucial for both journals and authors. Of course, impact factors are a reflection of this. But let us dig deeper. Does the article take a sophisticated reader on a well-crafted journey? Imagine examining an expensive handmade wallet that “unfolds” beautifully and impresses the holder with its carefully thought-through construction. Analogous to such, hypotheses should be theoretically rich and elegant. Measures should be not only appropriate but also optimal. Methodology should impress and should Captureflow like a symphony. Data should be rich and robust. Finally, artful discussion should whet our appetites for more research to come in the future. Not a small task, but certainly worth the outcome. Hence, I ask prospective authors to send their best work to Cornell Hospitality Quarterly (CQ) and impress us as I have outlined.

Read Michael LaTour’s editorial from the May issue of Cornell Hospitality Quarterly for free by clicking here. Don’t forget to click here to sign up for e-alerts and get all the latest from Cornell Hospitality Quarterly.

How Are Editorial Boards Comprised for Marketing Journals?

April 10, 2014 by

Becoming a member of an editorial board  can be a paramount step in the life of an academic. Scholars are able to explorelearning-with-pencil-948188-m new ideas in their field while increasing their notoriety. But just how are editorial boards of marketing journals constituted? That’s what authors Yue Pan and Jason Q. Zhang set out to research in their article titled “The Composition of the Editorial Boards of General Marketing Journals” from Journal of Marketing Education.

The abstract:

Unlike the diversity issues in corporate governance, the diversity in top academic positions (e.g., editorial boards of academic journals in business) is rather under researched. The editorial boards of academic marketing JME(D)_72ppiRGB_powerpointjournals are important gatekeepers and trendsetters in the creation and dissemination of marketing knowledge. Membership on journal editorial boards usually signals scholarly stature and professional advancement. This study examines the composition of editorial boards of general marketing journals, and compares it with what it was like 15 years ago. The study also investigates the impact of the composition of editorial boards on journal quality. We find that women’s participation in editorial boards generally corresponds to their presence in the profession. We also find an overall small representation of board members affiliated with nonacademic institutions. While the presence of women, practitioners, or international members does not have any relationship with journal quality, the presence of scholars affiliated with doctoral programs seems to correlate with journal quality. The number of female and international members on the boards increased, whereas practitioners’ representation dropped from 1997 to 2012.
Read “The Composition of the Editorial Boards of General Marketing Journals” from Journal of Marketing Education for free by clicking here. Click here to sign up for e-alerts and read all the latest from Journal of Marketing Education.

How the Internet Has Changed Our Travel Habits

April 9, 2014 by

The World Wide Web celebrated its 25th birthday this year, leaving us to reminisce about what life was like before it. But justdigital-world-1097861-m how much has it changed how we travel? Journal of Travel Research recently published an article bu authors Zheng Xiang of Virgina Tech, Dan Wang of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Joseph T. O’Leary of Colorado State University at Fort Collins, and Daniel R. Fesenmaier of Temple University exploring this topic in their OnlineFirst section entitled “Adapting to the Internet: Trends in Travelers’ Use of the Web for Trip Planning.”

 

The abstract:

The influence of the Internet on our social and economic life is well documented. However, few studies have been conducted to assess how travelers have adapted to the Internet over time. Using a series of national JTR_72ppiRGB_powerpointsurveys conducted over the past 6 years (2007–2012), this study describes important changes taking place in the use of the Internet by American travelers. The results point to a number of key trends in travelers’ use of the Internet and suggest that there is a growing “bifurcation” between traditional online travelers, that is, those who use the Internet for standard travel products and those who are beginning to adopt alternative channels and products in search of deeper and more authentic experiences. This article discusses several important implications of these trends for both research and practice.
Click here to read “Adapting to the Internet: Trends in Travelers’ Use of the Web for Trip Planning” from Journal of Travel Research for free! Want to know all the latest from Journal of Travel Research? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

 

Why Are Some Leaders Selfish?

April 8, 2014 by

Abraham Lincoln once said that if you wanted to test a man’s character, give him power. While one would hope that a personThe Strategy Of Chess would use their power to benefit people as a whole, it can become a solely self-serving practice. But just why would a leader act selfishly? That’s the question that Melissa J. Williams researched in her article, “Serving the Self From the Seat of Power: Goals and Threats Predict Leaders’ Self-Interested Behavior” from Journal of Management.

The abstract:

Why do some leaders use their position to amass personal prestige and resources, and others to benefit the team, the organization, or society? This article synthesizes new, cross-disciplinary research showing that jom coverself-serving leader behavior is predictable based on the function and nature of power—an essential component of leadership. First, because power increases goal-oriented behavior, it amplifies the tendency of self-focused goals to yield self-interested behavior. Self-focused goals may arise from a variety of sources; evidence is reviewed for the role of traits (e.g., low agreeableness), values (e.g., self-enhancement), self-construal (e.g., independence), and motivation (e.g., personalized power motivation). Second, because power is generally desirable, leaders whose power is threatened (e.g., self-doubts, positional instability) will turn their focus to maintaining that power—even at others’ expense. These ideas have important implications for research and for organizational efforts to develop leaders who will improve others’ outcomes rather than merely benefit themselves.
Click here to read “Serving the Self From the Seat of Power: Goals and Threats Predict Leaders’ Self-Interested Behavior” for free from Journal of Management. Want to know all the latest news from Journal of Management? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Are Academics Too Serious?

April 7, 2014 by

paper-emotions---ease-1158075-mLast December, President Obama said in an interview with talk-show host Steve Harvey that “You can’t take yourself too seriously.” The president went on to say that while he takes his job seriously, he survives the stress of it by laughing often with his team. Author Charles C. Manz suggests in his article from Journal of Management Inquiry titled “Let’s Get Serious! … Really?” that this concept holds true for researchers as well and should be put into practice.

The abstract:

As academics, we do work that is both serious and significant. Yet, being too seriousJMI_72ppiRGB_powerpoint can interfere with our performance and enjoyment of the knowledge creation and dissemination work we do as researchers and educators. In this essay, I call for some reflection on the value of not being too serious. I offer some stories and simple prescriptions in the spirit of pursuing career and life balance, personal effectiveness, and, just as importantly, fun as a not-too-serious academic scholar.
Read “Let’s Get Serious! … Really?” from Journal of Management Inquiry for free by clicking here. Click here to sign up for e-alerts to stay up to date on all the latest from Journal of Management Inquiry.

Out of Whack: A Scene from a Tenure and Promotion Review Committee Meeting

April 5, 2014 by

[We're pleased to reproduce Journal of Management Inquiry's most recent "Out of Whack" by Charles M. Vance.]

OofW2

Read “Out of Whack” for free from the April issue of Journal of Management Inquiry by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest from Journal of Management Inquiry? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!


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