Congratulations to Seigyoung Auh of Journal of Service Research!

October 20, 2014 by

_KKL9867We are delighted to congratulate Seigyoung Auh, winner of Journal of Service Research‘s Best Reviewer Award! Dr. Auh, kindly provided us with some information on his work:

Seigyoung’s research interests are in the areas of knowledge sharing/transfer in sales teams, frontline service employee extra role behavior, salesperson customer orientation diversity, sales team learning and conflict, service climate, service innovation, and service leadership.

His work has been published in journals such as Journal of Retailing, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of Service Research, Journal of Consumer Psychology, Sloan02JSR13_Covers.indd Management Review, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Marketing Letters, Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management, Industrial Marketing Management, and Journal of Business Research, among others. Seigyoung has worked as a marketing scientist before entering academia where he has taught in Australia, Canada, and Korea, before joining Thunderbird.

He is currently the Associate Editor at Journal of International Marketing and European Journal of Marketing. He is also on the editorial boards of several journals including Journal of Service Research, International Journal of Advertising, Journal of Business Research, among others.

More information on this award can be found by clicking here.

In honor of this award, you can read the latest issue of Journal of Service Research free for the next 30 days! Click here to access the Table of Contents. Want to know about all the latest news and research from Journal of Service Research? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Jennifer Chandler on Service Systems

October 17, 2014 by

[Editor's Note: A special thanks to Jennifer Chandler, who took the time to give us some insight on the article "Service Systems: A Broadened Framework and Research Agenda on Value Propositions, Engagement, and Service Experience." The article, recently published in Journal of Service Research, was co-authored with Robert F. Lusch.]

02JSR13_Covers.inddWe believe this study contributes to a deeper understanding of markets that is different than that which is guided by the standard neoclassical economics view of markets. Viewing service from a systems perspective as we do, this study outlines how, market actors – including firms, customers, suppliers – cannot sustain service experiences by themselves. This approach is important because, in many ways, all actors continually influence one another in today’s dynamic and complex market environment largely due to the ascendance of information technology and globalization.

I was inspired to research the topics of service systems, value propositions, and engagement because my work experience in service industries taught me that the exchanges between buyers and sellers in a market is very complex. Having worked in media and tourism, it was evident to me that decisions to exchange were not made based solely on economic factors. We collaborated, we traded, and we bartered. And, everyone involved in a deal knew that there was much more to be gained if we could move forward together, rather than if we set out to make one-time deals. All through my doctoral studies, I became increasingly intrigued with the idea of systems and their complex and adaptive nature. I decided I would devote considerable professional effort to a research program that would develop both conceptual models and frameworks and empirical research to better understand the complexities of exchange systems.

[You can read "Service Systems: A Broadened Framework and Research Agenda on Value Propositions, Engagement, and Service Experience" from Journal of Service Research by clicking here.]

8-17-11_newfaculty_mugs_kt  (Campus)  Portraits of the new faculty. PHOTO/ KAREN TAPIANew faculty member Jennifer ChandlerJennifer D. Chandler is an assistant professor of management at California State University, Fullerton, in the Mihaylo College of Business and Economics. She holds a BA from UCLA, an MBA from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and a PhD from the University of California, Irvine. Her research focuses on strategic service operations by integrating resource-based view of the firm with social networks analysis. She studies service experiences as well as the collaborative and knowledge management processes that coincide with service. Using multimethod research, she combines predictive modeling and qualitative data analysis. Before entering academia, she had a successful media sales, tourism, and international event management career. After working with media giants Clear Channel Communications and Raycom Media, she began her own agency working across the entertainment, tourism, nonprofit, retailing, and manufacturing sectors.

luschRobert F. Lusch is a professor of marketing, James and Pamela Muzzy Chair in entrepreneurship and innovation, and executive director of the McGuire Center of Entrepreneurship in the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. He is a thought leader in retailing and service marketing and is a major contributor to the growing literature on service-dominant Logic. A past chairperson of the American Marketing Association and editor of the Journal of Marketing, he is a frequent industry speaker on service innovation and service ecosystems. He has received the AMA Distinguished Marketing educator award, the Outstanding Marketing Faculty award from the Academy of Marketing Science, and on two occasions received the AMA/Journal of Marketing Harold Maynard Award for contributions to marketing theory. He has published 18 books and the most recent Service-Dominant Logic: Premises, Perspectives and Possibilities by Cambridge University Press (2014) is coauthored with Stephen L. Vargo.

Video: Sarah Miller McCune and Daniel Kahneman Discuss Social and Behavioral Sciences

October 16, 2014 by

Are social and behavioral sciences receiving the respect they deserve in the US today? SAGE Founder and executive chairman Sara Miller McCune and Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahneman sat down to discuss this as well as the importance of interdisciplinary work in the sciences, how social science can enrich the development of public and social policy in the economic and political turmoil in world today, and the possibility of behavioral sciences in the White House. The pair also discussed Kahneman’s acceptance of the inaugural SAGE-CASBS Award. You can view their conversation below:

The second SAGE-CASBS Award will be presented at the 2014 Behavioral & Social Science Summit, run by the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford University on November 8, 2014. For more information on the summit, click here.

***
A version of this post originally appeared on the SAGE Connection blog.

Journal of Service Research Invites Research on Health Service

October 15, 2014 by

medical-doctor-1314903-m Journal of Service Research is now accepting research for the upcoming special section entitled “Health Service Research: A Multidisciplinary Perspective,” which will publish in November of 2016! Editor Mary Jo Bitner will be joined by guest co-editors Tracey S. Danaher of Monash University, Australia and Andrew S. Gallan of DePaul University, USA for this section.

Scholars from both within and outside of business disciplines including marketing, management, information technology, economics, anthropology, design, education policy, health and public administration, psychology, public policy, social work, sociology and other related disciplines are invited to submit papers that examine the relationship between service and health care. All approaches (empirical, analytical, or conceptual) that create or extend theory in health service are welcome.

  • Examples of topics include, but are not limited to:
  • Service Innovation, Design, and Quality in Health Care Delivery
  • The Impact of Servicescapes in Health Services02JSR13_Covers.indd
  • New Service Models of Delivering Health Care
  • Front Line Employees and Service Provision in Health Care
  • A Network View of Health Care Services
  • Innovative Measurement and Metrics in Health Care Services
  • The Role of New Technologies in Providing Health Care Services (Electronic Medical Records, Health Information Technology, etc.)
  • Understanding the Patient Experience
  • Consumer Behavior in Health Services
  • Value Cocreation, Participation, and Engagement in Health Care Services
  • Methodological Breakthroughs in Health Service Research

Manuscripts are due May 15, 2015. For more information on this call, including how to submit, click here. Want news and notices like this from Journal of Service Research? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Connect With Human Resource Development Review!

October 14, 2014 by

HRDR_72ppiRGB_powerpointEver wondered who’s behind the work at Human Resource Development Review (HRDR)? Or perhaps anticipate what will be in the next issue? Human Resource Development Review is excited to kick off its social media campaign and looks to build a community of colleagues by sharing most read, most cited, and award-winning research articles, as well as editorial review board, author and student spotlights. We know that Human Resource Development Review offers its readers a wealth of resources to our scholarly community, and connecting scholars, practitioners, and graduate students through social media is our next step in sharing these scholarly resources.

You can learn more about the journal at hrd.sagepub.com and sign up for e-alerts for the latest Table of Contents and other Human Resource Development Review news.

FB: www.facebook.com/HRDRJournal
Twitter: @HRDRJournal
Instagram: @hrdrjournal

We look forward to connecting with you!

[You can click here to access the September issue of Human Resource Development Review, available to read FREE through the end of October!]

William J. Baumol on Social Responsibility

October 13, 2014 by

BAS_v50_72ppiRGB_powerpointRecently named by Thomson Reuters as one of the scholars predicted to be 2014 Nobel Laureate, William J. Baumol has led an active career as an American economic scholar. Dr. Baumol, now in his early nineties, is Harold Price Professor of Entrepreneurship and Academic Director of the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at New York University, as well as Senior Economist and Professor Emeritus at Princeton University. He is the author of over 45 books. He recently wrote an article which appeared in Business and Society entitled “On the Appropriate Social Responsibilities of Successful Entrepreneurs.”

The abstract:

This article offers proposed guidelines intended to protect the public interest in relationship to the advocated social responsibilities of successful entrepreneurs. The author argues that the most effective approach, then, is not preaching about obligations but, rather, establishing financial incentives for doing well by doing good. One example is the U.S. patent system. Another is a redesigned tax system that uses imposts to make socially damaging activities expensive, while reducing the financial burden on virtuous behavior.

Click here to read “On the Appropriate Social Responsibilities of Successful Entrepreneurs” from Business and Society! Don’t forget to sign up for e-alerts and get all the latest news and research from Business and Society sent directly to your inbox!

Book Review: Will China Democratize?

October 10, 2014 by

bookChina_0In the shadow of the 25 year anniversary of the Tiananmen square crackdown, the recent Hong Kong protests have generated interest in how China will respond. Could China ever adopt a democratic government?

Andrew J. Nathan, Larry Diamond, and Marc F. Plattner. Will China Democratize? Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013. 311pp. $29.96.

You can read the recent review by Peter F. Eder of the World Future Society in the March 2014 edition of World Future Review:

Juntao Wang, describing what he calls a “gray transformation,” agrees with several other optimistic authors, including Harry Harding and Cheng Li, that democracy will [most likely?] evolve non-violently. Competition among divergent social interests and political factions will produce incremental progress toward strengthening civil society, place checks and balances among governmental agencies, and expand accountability as the standard of legitimacy. These authors all believe that changes that have already taken place are moving China toward a significant transition away from being a totalitarian state.

WFR_72ppiRGB_powerpointOther essayists are less optimistic. Andrew Nathan calls China’s system “resilient authoritarianism.” This view emphasizes the ruling party’s ability to carry out an orderly leadership succession, the increasingly meritocratic nature of political advancement within the CCP, and the creation of institutional safety valves for venting social discontent. A network of bureaucrats and entrepreneurs creates a bulkhead that contains changes unfavorable to the party.

Contributors such as Arthur Waldron, Gongxin Xiao, Bruce Gilley, and Minxin Pei offer complimentary views. Collectively they argue that, over time, internal power struggles, corruption, and burdensome authoritarianism will lead to inevitable but not predictable events and that a crisis will open the way to democracy.

You can read the rest of the review from World Future Review by clicking here. Want to read all the latest reviews and research from World Future Review? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

The Hidden Costs of Working Sick

October 9, 2014 by

sneeze-894326-mWork doesn’t stop when we’re under the weather. But how does feeling bad affect how we perform our jobs? To address this question, Michael Christian, Noah Eisenkraft, and Chaitali Kapadia of the Kenan-Flager Business School at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill investigate how somatic complaints such as pain and illness affect how much people help their coworkers and expend less effort on their job. Tracking two samples of office workers over time, the researchers linked pain at work to ebbs and flows job performance via its effects on the worker’s energy.

Explaining their findings, the researchers argue that pain and illness consumes the same energy people use for motivation and direct towards performing work tasks. As a result, workers in pain are more ASQ_v59n3_Sept2014_cover.inddlikely to withdraw and narrow their focus to just the essential parts of their job role. People in pain, whether the pain is caused by a chronic condition or a fleeting headache, are less likely to help coworkers or make constructive suggestions for improvement at work. On the bright side, the study reported that these effects diminished over time. Long-term sufferers of chronic pain have an increased capacity for balancing daily job demands with pain.

The implications? Daily changes in physical health should be “legitimized” at work. Employees are often asked or obligated to work regardless of how poorly they feel. This is bad for business. Organizations that want the best performance from their employees should be proactive about employee health, developing and implementing effective treatments and symptom management strategies, especially for those employees who have chronic health conditions. Leaders who recognize that an employee’s physical health—rather than his or her commitment—can affect performance may reap long-term benefits by showing understanding to their workers. The study is published in Administrative Science Quarterly.

[The study is entitled "Dynamic Associations among Somatic Complaints, Human Energy, and Discretionary Behaviors: Experiences with Pain Fluctuations at Work" and can be read for free from Administrative Science Quarterly by clicking here.]

Stewart Clegg on Relationships in Organizations

October 8, 2014 by

valentines-day-theme-1-1413274-mStewart Clegg, widely acknowledged as one of the most significant contemporary theorists of power relations, recently collaborated with Miguel Pina e Cunha, Arménio Rego, and Joana Story on their article “Powers of Romance: The Liminal Challenges of Managing Organizational Intimacy” from Journal of Management Inquiry.

The abstract:

Problematic organizational relationships have recently been at the core of highly visible media coverage. Most analyses of sexual relations in organizations have been, however, JMI_72ppiRGB_powerpointsimplistic and unidimensional, and have placed insufficient systematic emphasis on the role of governmentality in the social construction of organizational romance. In this article, we proceed in two theoretical steps. First, we elaborate a typology of organizational romance that covers different manifestations of this nuanced process. We think of these as organizational strategies of governmentality. Second, we elaborate and identify liminal cases that fall into the interstices of the four predominant ways of managing sexual relationships in organizations. We think of these as vases of liquid love and life that evade the border controls of regulation by governmentality. Finally, we relate these issues to debates about the nature of the civilizational process and suggest hypotheses for future research.

You can read “Powers of Romance: The Liminal Challenges of Managing Organizational Intimacy” from Journal of Management Inquiry for free by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research like this from Journal of Management Inquiry? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Advances in Developing Human Resources Seeks Editor-in-Chief!

October 7, 2014 by

pencil-1269186-mAdvances in Developing Human Resources is currently welcoming applications for the position of Editor-in-Chief!

Published quarterly, each issue of Advances in Developing Human Resources is devoted to a different topic central to the development of human resources. The journal has covered subjects as wide-ranging and vital as performance improvement, action learning, on-the-job training, informal learning, work-life balance, career development and human resource development, leadership, and the philosophical foundations of HRD practice.

The term of office is three years, beginning in July 2015. A stipend is provided.

Desired qualifications for the position include:

  • A strong record of scholarly contribution to human resource development, reflected ADHR_72ppiRGB_powerpointin publication in scholarly journals and presentations at professional conferences
  • Experience as an editor, associate or assistant editor, or editorial review board member
  • Familiarity with Advances in Developing Human Resources – its mission and the audience it serves
  • A demonstrated ability to lead an editorial team, editorial board, and authors and reviewers
  • Excellent project management and organizational skills to ensure publication deadlines are met and quality is maintained
  • Evidence of support and commitment from the applicant’s institution – particularly in terms of release time and administrative support

Applications should include the following:

  • A letter of application that addresses how the candidate meets the desired qualifications
  • A current curriculum vita
  • A letter of institutional support (e.g., dean and/or provost)

The successful applicant will have an advanced degree in HRD or related field and be currently working in an HRD role in education, business, government, and/or community sectors. Demonstrated experience with the editorial process (as editor, associate editor or editorial board member) is preferred.

Please send completed applications to Kim McDonald by December 15, 2014.

All application materials and questions can be directed to:

Kimberly McDonald, Ed.D.
Editor-in-Chief, Advances in Developing Human Resources
Indiana-Purdue University Fort Wayne
Fort Wayne, IN 46805 click here.
Phone: 260-481-6418
mcdonalk@ipfw.edu

More information about the journal can be found by clicking here. To view the Table of Contents of the most current issue of Advances in Developing Human Resources click here.

Want to be notified of all the latest news like this from Advances in Developing Human Resources? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 674 other followers

%d bloggers like this: