New Podcast: Employees’ Innovative Work Involvement in Family Firms

Podcast MicrophoneIn the latest podcast from Family Business Review, Assistant Editor Karen Vinton interviews author Yannick Bammens of Maastricht University. Yannick published an article with co-authors Guy Notelaers and Anita Van Gils entitled “Implications of Family Business Employment for Employees’ Innovative Work Involvement,” which earned a honorable mention for Family Business Review‘s 2016 Best Paper award.

The abstract for the paper:

This study builds on the idea that family businesses perform particularly well in the domain of exploitative innovations and explores a possible source of this strength, namely their employees’ spontaneous involvement in informal innovation activity. Specifically, we develop a mediation model on the FBR_v26n1_72ppiRGB_150pixWinterrelationship between family business employment and employees’ innovative work involvement. Analyses are based on a sample of 893 Belgian employees using structural equation modeling. Results suggest that family business employment is positively associated with employees’ innovative work involvement, and that part of this relationship can be attributed to their heightened perceptions of organizational support and work motivation.

You can listen to the podcast with Karen Vinton and author Yannick Bammens by clicking here. Want to hear more content from Family Business Review? Click here to search the full list of podcasts from the journal.

The article, “Implications of Family Business Employment for Employees’ Innovative Work Involvement” from Family Business Review will be free to read for the next two weeks–click here to read it! Want to stay up to date on all of the latest research from Family Business ReviewClick here to sign up for e-alerts!


YannickYannick Bammens, PhD, is an assistant professor of management at Maastricht University, the Netherlands. His current research centers on innovation management and corporate governance in the setting of founder- and family-led enterprises. His research has been published in journals such as Journal of Management, International Journal of Management Reviews, Small Business Economics, Journal of Business Ethics, and Journal of Small Business Management.

https://managementink.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/karen_vinton1.jpg?w=450Karen L. Vinton, Ph.D., is assistant editor of FBR and a 1999 Barbara Hollander Award winner and Professor Emeritus of Business at the College of Business at Montana State University, where she founded the University’s Family Business Program. An FFI Fellow, she has served on its Board of Directors and chaired the Body of Knowledge committee.

Do the Benefits of Work Engagement Extend Beyond the Office?

3925183530_4902bb6ae9_zStudies of work engagement and the associated positive outcomes tend to focus on the effects of engagement exclusively in the work realm, but do the benefits of work engagement extend beyond the office? In a recent Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies article entitled “The Work/Nonwork Spillover: The Enrichment Role of Work Engagement,” authors Liat Eldor, Itzhak Harpaz, and Mina Westman expand the scope of research on the effects of work engagement.

The abstract for the paper:

This study examines whether work engagement enriches employees beyond the JLOcontribution of the domain of work, focusing on satisfaction with life and community involvement. Moreover, the ambivalence of scholars about the added value of the work engagement concept compared with similar work-related attitudes prompted us to assess the benefits that work engagement offers with regard to improving one’s satisfaction with life and community involvement compared with the benefits of other, similar work-related attitudes such as job involvement and job satisfaction. Furthermore, given the studies indicating the impact of sector of employment (public vs. business) on understanding the work/nonwork nexus, the current study also investigates the effect of the sector of employment on this enrichment process. Utilizing multilevel modeling analysis techniques on data from 554 employees in public and business sector organizations, we obtained results consistent with our hypotheses. Work engagement and employees’ outcomes beyond work had positive and significant relationships. Moreover, the relationship between work engagement and community involvement was stronger in public sector employees than in business sector employees. The implications for organizational theory, research, and practice are discussed as possible leverage points for creating conditions that promote engagement at work and beyond.

You can read “The Work/Nonwork Spillover: The Enrichment Role of Work Engagement” from Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Picnic image attributed to Benson Kua (CC)

Why Do Careers Plateau?

business-graphics-1428662-mWhen faced with a plateau in their career, why do some employees feel stuck and others content? What causes this plateau in the first place? Veronica M. Godshalk and C. Melissa Fender discuss in their article “External and Internal Reasons for Career Plateauing: Relationships With Work Outcomes” from Group and Organization Management.

The abstract:

Career plateauing has received little attention in the literature of late, even when employees are retaining their positions longer with little likelihood for GOM 39(6)_Covers.inddadvancement or increased job responsibilities. Relationships between reasons for structural and content plateauing and work outcomes are investigated among professional accounting association members. Contributing to the literature, our findings confirm existence of external and internal plateauing reasons and various relationships with outcomes. External reasons for structural plateauing were negatively related to job and career satisfaction, while content plateauing for external reasons was negatively related to job involvement and work motivation. Structural plateauing for internal reasons lowered job involvement, but increased job and career satisfaction, as well as intention to stay. Job involvement and work motivation mediated relationships between several reasons and job satisfaction, career satisfaction, and intention to stay. Managerial implications and future research opportunities are noted.

Click here to read “External and Internal Reasons for Career Plateauing: Relationships With Work Outcomes” from Group and Organization Management. Want to know about all the latest news and research from Group and Organization Management? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Employee Innovation in Family Business Environments

FBR_C1_revised authors color.indd[Editor’s Note: We are pleased to welcome Yannick Bammens, Guy Notelaers, and Anita Van Gils who collaborated on their article entitled “Implications of Family Business Employment for Employees’ Innovative Work Involvement,” available now in the OnlineFirst Section of Family Business Review.]

It is generally accepted that innovation is critical for the continued growth and vitality of organizations and economies, and scholars have started to explore how family influence in organizations may affect innovation-relevant issues. Recent studies indicate that family businesses generally favor incremental over radical innovations, and that they actually outperform other organizational forms with respect to such incremental or exploitative innovations. Yet, little is known about the processes through which family businesses pursue incremental innovations and why they may be better at it than organizational forms without family influence. The purpose of this study is to shed further light on this intriguing question by examining one possible explanation related to the role of employees’ spontaneous innovative work involvement as an internal informal source of incremental innovation.

Our study reveals that employees who work at a family business indeed show higher levels of spontaneous involvement in informal innovation activity compared to employees active in organizations without family influence. It appears that family businesses have strengths with respect to the fostering of an innovation-supportive work climate, in which employees feel genuinely cared for and encouraged to contribute to organizational performance with their creative ideas and suggestions for improvement. In other words, our study suggests that family businesses have advantages with regard to internal informal paths leading to innovation outputs that are largely incremental or exploitative in nature. These findings complement prior research which mainly highlighted family-based weaknesses and limitations regarding internal formal innovation inputs (R&D expenditures), external innovation inputs (open innovation collaborations) and radical innovation outputs. As such, family businesses may serve as an example for those organizations interested in fostering a more innovation-supportive work climate that helps unleash the innovation potential of its workforce.

Read “Implications of Family Business Employment for Employees’ Innovative Work Involvement,” in Family Business Review. For notifications on articles like this, click here to sign up for e-alerts from Family Business Review.

Dr. Yannick  BammensYannick Bammens, PhD, is an assistant professor of management at Maastricht University, the Netherlands. His current research centers on innovation management and corporate governance in the setting of founder- and family-led enterprises. His research has been published in journals such as Journal of Management, International Journal of Management Reviews, Small Business Economics, Journal of Business Ethics, and Journal of Small Business Management.

Guy NotelaersGuy Notelaers, PhD, is an associate professor of work and organizational psychology at University of Bergen, Norway.He has published on the dark side of management and counterproductive workplace behaviors, such as workplace bullying, in journals such as Work and Stress, British Journal of Management, European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, and Economic and Industrial Democracy.

Anita Van Gils, PhD, is an associate professor of entrepreneurship at Maastricht University, the Netherlands, and a member of the executive board of IFERA. Her research interests include strategic and organizational aspects of entrepreneurial, small to medium-sized and family businesses. Her research has been published in journals such as Corporate Governance: An International Review, International Journal of Management Reviews, Small Business Economics, Journal of Small Business Management, and  International Small Business Journal.

Testing the Developmental Nature of Work Motivation

Testing the Developmental Nature of Work Motivation Using Kegan’s Constructive-Development Theory,” by Marilyn J. Bugenhagen and John E. Barbuto, Jr., appeared on OnlineFirst of the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies on August 25, 2011.

The Abstract:

This article reports a field study testing the relationship between individuals’ constructive-development level and their sources of work motivation. Constructive development was assessed using the Subject–Object Interview for 53 community and educational leaders. Motivation was assessed using the Motivation Sources Inventory. Results indicated that constructive-development progression was significantly related to instrumental motivation. No other significant relationships were found, indicating that the other four sources of work motivation exist independent of individuals’ constructive development. Implications for research and practice are addressed.

To view other articles on OnlineFirst, please click here. To learn more about the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, please follow this link.

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