How Can Positive Practices in the Workplace Impact Teams?

Dr. Perry Geue recently published an article in  The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, which is entitled "Positive Practices in the Workplace: Impact on Team Climate, Work Engagement, and Task Performance." We are pleased to welcome Dr. Geue as a contributor and excited to announce that the findings will be free to access on our site for … Continue reading How Can Positive Practices in the Workplace Impact Teams?

Leadership and Employee Work Passion: Propositions for Future Empirical Investigations

[We’re pleased to welcome author Dr. Richard Egan of the University of Canberra, Mark Turner and Deborah Blackman of the University of New South Wales. They recently published an article in the Human Resource Development Review, entitled “Leadership and Employee Work Passion: Propositions for Future Empirical Investigations,” which is currently free to read for a … Continue reading Leadership and Employee Work Passion: Propositions for Future Empirical Investigations

Deconstructing Privilege and Equalizing Access to Employee Engagement

[We're pleased to welcome Brad Shuck of University of Louisville. Brad recently published an article in Human Resource Development Review with co-authors Joshua C. Collins, Tonette S. Rocco, and Raquel Diaz, entitled "Deconstructing the Privilege and Power of Employee Engagement: Issues of Inequality for Management and Human Resource Development." From Brad:] We were inspired to … Continue reading Deconstructing Privilege and Equalizing Access to Employee Engagement

Do the Benefits of Work Engagement Extend Beyond the Office?

Studies of work engagement and the associated positive outcomes tend to focus on the effects of engagement exclusively in the work realm, but do the benefits of work engagement extend beyond the office? In a recent Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies article entitled "The Work/Nonwork Spillover: The Enrichment Role of Work Engagement," authors Liat Eldor, Itzhak Harpaz, … Continue reading Do the Benefits of Work Engagement Extend Beyond the Office?

The Hidden Costs of Working Sick

Work doesn't stop when we're under the weather. But how does feeling bad affect how we perform our jobs? To address this question, Michael Christian, Noah Eisenkraft, and Chaitali Kapadia of the Kenan-Flager Business School at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill investigate how somatic complaints such as pain and illness affect how much … Continue reading The Hidden Costs of Working Sick

Mental Health and Work: Employee Engagement, Part 1 of 3

Results from the U.S. National Co-morbidity Survey, a nationally representative study of Americans ages 15 to 54, reported that 18% of those who were employed said they experienced symptoms of a mental health disorder in the previous month. During Mental Health Awareness Month (#MHM2014) it seems fitting to examine research on a problem affecting many … Continue reading Mental Health and Work: Employee Engagement, Part 1 of 3

Exploring the Effects of Attachment in Work Relationships

In the 21st century, studies on human relationships in the workplace have become a regular occurrence. In the article “Attachment and Autonomy in the Workplace: New Insights”, Hadassah Littman-Ovadia, Lior Oren and Shiri Lavy at Ariel University explore the correlation between avoiding attachment in work relationships and work burnout and emotional distress. Read the article … Continue reading Exploring the Effects of Attachment in Work Relationships

Attachment and Autonomy in Work Relationships

In the 21st century, studies on human relationships in the workplace have become a regular occurrence. In the article “Attachment and Autonomy in the Workplace: New Insights”, Hadassah Littman-Ovadia, Lior Oren and Shiri Lavy at Ariel University explore the correlation between avoiding attachment in work relationships and work burnout and emotional distress. Read the article and others … Continue reading Attachment and Autonomy in Work Relationships

What Happens When Workers Speak Out?

Research has shown that employees dissatisfied with working conditions inevitably will communicate their dissent--whether to a superior or only to a coworker--despite the risks of such behavior. A new study in the Journal of Business Communication (JBC) finds that this dissent expression can benefit the employees themselves, as well as the health of the organizations … Continue reading What Happens When Workers Speak Out?