Labor Economics and May Day throughout the Year

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As in recent years, work and economic issues have been on the minds of citizens worldwide – and not just on May Day. Almost on a daily basis we’ve seen or read about the challenges faced by employers, employees, unions, policy makers, and governments worldwide. From debates over raising the minimum wage, to discussions of pay equity and discrimination, workplace health risk factors and health insurance, and more, labor and work concerns are affecting us all. On this week set aside to recognize the international labor movement, we are pleased to highlight key journals in Economics, Industrial Relations & Labor.

We invite you to enjoy access to the following journals through June 30th. Click here to access the trial.

NEW TO SAGE IN 2016: We are pleased to publish The American Economist, the official journal of Omicron Delta Epsilon, the International Honor Society in Economics. The American Economist publishes original research from all fields and schools of economic thought, written by young scholars and those who are teaching the next generation of economists, as well as experienced and prominent economists whose influence has shaped the discipline. We invite you to read a special collection of articles from Nobel Peace Prize winning authors here.

May Day: Research has much to say about challenges in the workplace.

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Work issues have often taken center stage this year. From debates over raising the minimum wage, to discussions of pay equity and discrimination, workplace health risk factors and health insurance, and more, labor and work concerns are on the minds of employers, employees, unions, policy makers, and governments worldwide. On this day set aside to recognize the international labor movement, we are pleased to highlight key journals in Economics, Industrial Relations & Labor.

We invite you to enjoy access to the following journals through June 30th. Click here to access the trial.

COMING IN 2016: We are pleased to begin publishing The American Economist, the official journal of Omicron Delta Epsilon, the International Honor Society in Economics. The American Economist publishes original research from all fields and schools of economic thought, written by young scholars and those who are teaching the next generation of economists, as well as experienced and prominent economists whose influence has shaped the discipline.

Work, work, work…

gears-94220_640Today is International Workers’ Day, also known as May Day, a celebration of the international labor movement. SAGE publishes a number of top-ranked journals in Economics and in Industrial Relations & Labor, offering relevant insights into key issues.

We invite you to enjoy access to the following journals through May 31st. Click to access.

COMING IN AUGUST: We are pleased to begin publishing the ILRReview, Industrial & Labor Relations Review,  in association with the Cornell University ILR School, under the editorship of Rosemary Batt and Lawrence M. Kahn. The ILRReview has published the top, peer-reviewed theoretical and empirical research on work and employment relations for 65 years. Published five times a year, the Review features international and interdisciplinary research that advances new theory, presents novel empirical work, and informs organizational and public policy.

 

Can We Save Jobs By Raising Corporate Taxes?

Harvard Business Review’s The Daily Stat this week spotlighted an article from Public Finance Review that is the first to empirically study the impact of corporate taxes on the unemployment rate, and reveals some surprising and significant findings. From the Stat:

An increase of 10 percentage points in the corporate tax rate is associated with a drop of 2.1 percentage points in the unemployment rate, according to a study by Horst Feldmann of the University of Bath in the UK of data on 19 industrial countries. Although raising corporate taxes has been shown to reduce economic growth, it also unexpectedly prompts companies to substitute labor for capital and spurs unions to reduce their wage demands in order to avoid job losses, Feldmann says.

You can read the complete article in Public Finance Review, “The Unemployment Puzzle of Corporate Taxation,” by following this link. Concluding that the predicted effect is one of significant magnitude, Dr. Feldmann writes in his abstract:

Using annual data on nineteen industrial countries for the period 1979–2005 and a large number of controls, this article is the first to empirically study the impact of corporate taxes on the unemployment rate. In contrast to previous empirical research on the labor demand, investment and growth effects of corporate taxation, which consistently finds adverse effects, the regression results suggest that higher corporate taxes may have a favorable impact, lowering the unemployment rate. The magnitude of the estimated effect is substantial. The results of this study are robust to both endogeneity and numerous variations in specification.

Stay on top of findings like these from PFR by signing up for e-alerts!  Economists, policy makers, political scientists, and researchers rely on PFR for the most up-to-date information and to help them put policies and research into action.

Employee Job Search

Wendy R. Boswell, Ryan D. Zimmerman and Brian W. Swider, all of Texas A&M University, published “Employee Job Search: Toward an Understanding of Search Context and Search Objectives” on September 30th, 2011 in the Journal of Management’s OnlineFirst collection. To view other OnlineFirst articles, please click here.

The abstract:

Job search behaviors occur across various contexts, involving diverse populations of job seekers searching for employment opportunities. In particular, individuals may search for their first jobs following a period of education, may seek reemployment following job loss, or may search for new opportunities while currently employed. Research in each of these contexts has evolved somewhat separately, yet there is value to applying the ideas and findings from one search context to other search contexts. The purpose of this article is to review the prior research in each of the three job search contexts and offer an integrative analysis of the predictors, processes, consequences, and varying objectives of job search behavior across an individual’s potential employment situations (i.e., new entrant, job loser, employed job seeker). Implications for future research on job search behavior are discussed.

To learn more about the Journal of Management, please follow this link.

Are you interested in receiving email alerts whenever a new article or issue becomes available online? Then click here!

Management INK would like to wish all of its readers a Happy Thanksgiving!!

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