Laissez-Colbert: Using The Colbert Report to Teach Macroeconomics

512px-rally_to_restore_sanity_andor_fear_-_colbertIt is not often that economics and comedy come together, but for professors looking to infuse their macroeconomics courses with comedic appeal, look no further than The Colbert Report. A recent article from The American Economist from author Gregory M. Randolph entitled “Laissez-Colbert: Teaching Introductory Macroeconomics with The Colbert Report” outlines how the Comedy Central show can be useful tool to engage students and teach lessons about macroeconomic principles, including GDP, supply and demand, and unemployment. The abstract for the paper:

The Colbert Report combines comedic entertainment and current events, two pedagogical sources that have the potential to increase student interest in classes and improve student learning. This article offers suggestions on the use of segments from The Colbert Report to teach introductory macroeconomics. Segments Current Issue Coverare included that relate to comparative advantage, supply and demand, externalities, GDP, unemployment, classical versus Keynesian theory and the Great Depression, fiscal policy and economic stimulus packages, monetary policy and the Federal Reserve, money, taxes, and foreign aid. Guidance is provided regarding the use of the clips in an introductory macroeconomics class.

You can read “Laissez-Colbert: Teaching Introductory Macroeconomics with The Colbert Report” from The American Economist free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to stay current on all of the latest research published by The American EconomistClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Stephen Colbert image attributed to Cliff (CC)

The American Economist Is Now Online!

AEX_72ppiRGB_powerpointWe’re pleased to announce that The American Economist is now online with a new, special March 2016 issue! The special issue takes a look back at some of The American Economist‘s most influential articles, each with a new Editor’s Introduction. Editor-in-Chief Paul Grimes introduces the special issue:

This edition of The American Economist marks a new chapter in the history of the journal and its sponsoring organization, Omicron Delta Epsilon, The International Honor Society in Economics. For more than five decades, Omicron Delta Epsilon self-published the journal using a variety of university presses and contract printers to physically produce and distribute the journal to members of the society, individual subscribers, and libraries around the world. Its deep red cover and distinctive title wordmark became iconic symbols within the economics profession. Although the size and format of the journal evolved over time, the journal was produced only in a hardcopy format—until this issue. With Volume 61, Number 1, Spring 2016, The American Economist enters the digital age of journal publication…

Omicron Delta Epsilon recently celebrated its 100th birthday and The American Economistrecently passed the 50th anniversary of its association with the honor society. As we move past these important milestones and into the digital future, it is fitting that we take the time to look back on the journal’s valuable legacy. This issue opens with a bibliographic history of The American Economist that chronicles the journal’s path from a student-edited and student-produced annual publication into a well-respected academic journal with a global readership. The history is followed by the republication of 12 classic articles from the journal’s backfile. These curated articles were selected to provide readers with a feel of The American Economist’s rich heritage of publishing original work by some of the world’s most prominent economists. Papers by Milton Friedman, Paul Samuelson, John Kenneth Galbraith, Robert Solow, and Elinor Ostrom are included here, among others. Each article opens with a new Editor’s Introduction to set the paper and the author into its proper context.

In honor of the impressive legacy of The American Economist, we Nobels_fredspris,_medalje_-_no-nb_digifoto_20160310_00042_NB_NS_NM_10016are pleased to present a special collection of articles from the journal that we written by Nobel Peace Prize winning authors. You can read the special collection from The American Economist free for the next 30 days by clicking here.

To read the March 2016 special issue, also free for the next 30 days, click here. Want to know all about the latest research from The American Economist? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

The American Economist is Now Accepting Submissions!

AEX_72ppiRGB_powerpointYou can now submit electronically to The American Economist through SAGE Track!

As an official publication of Omicron Delta Epsilon, The International Honor Society in Economics, The American Economist strives to contribute to the ongoing dialog and academic debates within the economics discipline by publishing original research and review articles from all fields and schools of economic thought. Published twice a year in the Spring and the Fall, the journal has honored academic achievement in economics for more than fifty years.

The American Economist specifically encourages submissions from young scholars and those who are teaching the next generation of economists, and will continue to publish papers from experienced and prominent economists whose influence has shaped the discipline.

Manuscript Guidelines

The paper should include five keywords and an abstract of about 100 words, which will be used on the web to describe the article. Articles that have already been published elsewhere cannot be considered. All submissions are single-blind reviewed. Articles regarding all areas of economics and its related fields are appropriate for submission. Submitted articles should not exceed twenty-five pages in length.

  1. A title page should include article’s title and the author’s name and affiliation. Address details should be brief, including telephone number and e-mail.
  2. The text of the article should include section headings (designated by Roman numerals—I, II, III. . .), and subsection headings (Arabic numbers—1,2,3. . .). References to sources should be in the following form: (Jones 2003, 12–16).
  3. Please do not use any footnotes, rather put all notes immediately following your article. Numbering should be done using the standard Arabic number system (1,2,3, etc.).
  4. Please do not use any handwritten or typed figures and equations. All equations should be computer generated, and alike in proportion. The authors are responsible for providing copies of their charts, graphs, and tables and have them numbered consecutively in the text in Arabic numerals and also provided on separate sheets.
  5. References should follow the Notes section at the end of the article.
  6. Bibliographic citations should follow ASA style guidelines.
  7. The American Economist holds the copyright to all its published articles.

You can submit now by clicking here!

Make sure to watch for more from The American Economist in 2016!