The Effect of Workplace Inspections on Worker Safety

Ling Li of the University of Wisconsin– Parkside and Perry Singleton of Syracuse University recently published in article in the ILR Review entitled, “The Effect of Workplace Inspections on Worker Safety,” which is free to read for a limited time. The abstract for the article is below:

ilra_71_4_coverThe US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enforces safety regulations through workplace inspections. The authors estimate the effect of inspections on worker safety by exploiting a feature of OSHA’s Site-Specific Targeting plan. The program targeted establishments for inspection if their baseline case rate exceeded a cutoff. This approach generated a discontinuous increase in inspections, which the authors exploit for identification. Using the fuzzy regression discontinuity model, they find that inspections decrease the rate of cases that involve days away from work, job restrictions, and job transfers in the calendar year immediately after the inspection cycle. They find no effect for other case rates or in subsequent years. Effects are most evident in manufacturing and less evident in health services, the largest two-digit industries represented in the data.

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Macro-Social Marketing and Gun Violence in America

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Traditionally marketing has focused on how to change individual’s behavior in order to buy a product. What media strategies can increase sales, and how to associate values with products? With the advent of the social marketing fields, analysis focused on how conventional marketing tools could be used to change behavior to improve one’s well being and address social problems. While there is a wealth of literature that looks at how government agencies can utilize marketing tools to effect individuals engaged in certain behavior, there has been little research on how NGO’s utilize the same tools to alter behavior and invoke policy changes.

Researchers and Authors Aimee Dinnin Huff, Michelle Barnhart, Brandon McAlexander, and Jim McAlexander perform a pertinent expansion of this field by  looking at how American Gun Violence Prevention groups (GVPGS) act as macro-social marketers.

They recently published in article in the Journal of Macromarketing entitled, “Addressing the Wicked Problem of American Gun Violence: Consumer Interest Groups as Macro-social Marketers,” which is free to read for a limited time. The abstract for the article is below:

Building on work on social and macro-social marketing, we provide an empirical account of ways in which American gun violence prevention groups (GVPGs) act as macro-social marketers as they address the wicked problem of gun violence, which they define as deaths and injuries with firearms. We find that, as a collective, GVPGs attempt to change the culture related to guns by targeting up-, mid-, and downstream agents. We contribute to theory by (1) expanding the concept of macro- social marketing beyond government entities to include consumer interest groups and collectives; (2) introducing internal marketing as a macro-social marketing tool critical for macro-social marketers dependent largely on volunteers; (3) elucidating ways that macro-social marketers can accomplish upstream changes indirectly, by encouraging consumers and citizens to influence policy makers; and (4) revealing marketing tactics that can be leveraged across up-, mid-, downstream, and internal efforts.

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Success Story: How the Adelante Program Uses Social Marketing to Engage Latino Youth

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[We’re pleased to welcome William Douglas Evans of George Washington University. Dr. Evans recently published an article in the March 2016 issue of Social Marketing Quarterly with co-authors Elizabeth Louise Andrade, Ricardo Villalba, Idalina Cubilla, I. Rivera, and Mark C. Edberg, entitled “Turning the Corner: Development of the Adelante Program Brand of Latino Youth.”]

My recent publication, Turning the Corner: Development of the Adelante Program Brand for Latino Youth, extends recent work on health branding for behavior change to engagement in positive youth development (PYD) programs. Latino youth face numerous challenges and this project shows that development of a positive brand identity for community behavior change programs based on a PYD model can increase youth engagement. The formative research reported in this paper points the way to implementation strategies including use of role models depicted by local youth to build interest in the program. It also sets the stage for a digital media intervention in which youth role models tell their stories of program engagement within their social networks, creating a program ripple effect and community-wide engagement.

The abstract:

SMQ March 2016This article reports on formative research to develop the Adelante brand, an innovative program for Latino immigrant adolescents and their families. The brand applies social marketing principles used in previous health brands in areas such as tobacco control, substance use, and HIV prevention. Specific objectives were to apply branding principles as an approach to increasing adolescent engagement with, and participation in, a community-based youth development program called Adelante, which is based on positive youth development theory. We collected data in a primarily low-income Latino immigrant community, Langley Park, MD, located near Washington, DC. A total of 39 adolescents, ages 13–19, participated in six focus groups. We designed and tested a brand positioning statement, associations, a logo and graphics, and youth archetypes. We used thematic content analysis to code focus group data into broad topic areas and then analyzed the data using substantive coding to identify themes. The concepts of strength, resilience, and “turning the corner” by overcoming life obstacles and succeeding were the main themes. Latino youth face a challenging environment in which they grow up, finish school, and succeed. Adelante represents a source of support and help to turn the corner. A graphic depicting a city street corner with a darker side (past) and a brighter side (future) was identified as the Adelante logo. Youth characters named Victor and Erika, and an educational entertainment strategy, were conceived as a way to create a brand persona. Adelante is now actively building its brand to increase youth engagement in the program.

You can read “Turning the Corner: Development of the Adelante Program Brand of Latino Youth” from Social Marketing Quarterly free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Social Marketing Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Classroom image credited to KT King (CC)

 

William Douglas Evans is a Professor of Prevention and Community Health & Global Health at George Washington University. He is lead author of the study and co-PI of the Avance Center.

Elizabeth Louise Andrade is an Assistant Research Professor of Prevention and Community Health at George Washington University. She collaborated on study implementation and is co-PI of the Avance Center.

Ricardo Villalba is a Case Manager at the Maryland Multicultural Youth Center. He participated in youth program activities and moderated youth discussions.

Idalina Cubilla is an Avance Center Doctoral Research Associate. She participated in program activities and assisted in Adelante brand development.

I. Rivera is a Consultant in formative research activities. She moderated focus groups with youth.

Mark C. Edberg is an Associate Professor of Prevention and Community Health at George Washington University. He is PI of the Avance Center.

Book Review: Strategic Social Marketing

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Jeff French and Ross Gordon, Strategic Social Marketing. London: SAGE Publications, Ltd. 2015. 448 pp. $155.00 (hardcover), $59.00 (paper-back), $37.60 (Kindle edition)

ISBN 978-1-44624-861-1 (hardcover), ISBN 978-1-44624-862-1 (paperback)

Ann-Marie Kennedy of Auckland University of Technology recently took the time to review Jeff French and Ross Gordon’s book in the Journal of Macromarketing. Here is an excerpt from her review:

Strategic Social Marketing by Jeff French and Ross Gordon provides a well-rounded view of social marketing that will broaden each reader’s understanding of the concept. In a refreshing take on social marketing, they focus on strategic social marketing, which is defined as: ‘‘The systemic, critical and reflexive application of social JMMK_new C1 template.inddmarketing principles to enhance social policy selection, objective setting, planning and operational delivery’’ (p. 45). Taking a more macro view, this is different from other books on social marketing that focus on individual level behavior change almost exclusively.

Throughout the authors develop the reader’s understanding of social marketing from traditional concepts to the latest discussions and conceptualizations among academics. This should not be surprising given the authors’ contributions to recent developments in social marketing thought within and beyond the Journal of Social Marketing. Not shying away from both sides of the story, they also present criticism, contradictions, and critiques, blending theory to aid readers in reaching their own conclusions. With thoughtful insights and enlightened citations, this is a must read for anyone in the area.

You can read the full review from Journal of Macromarketing by clicking here. Like what you read? Click here to sign up for e-alerts for the latest research and articles published by the Journal of Macromarketing.

Book Review: A Social Strategy: How We Profit from Social Media

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Mikolaj Piskorski: A Social Strategy: How We Profit from Social Media. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2014. 275 pp. $29.95, cloth.

You can read the book review by Olga Khessina of ILR School Cornell University published online by Administrative Science Quarterly. From the review:

Social strategy is still an emerging phenomenon, but it is increasingly important. There is a great need to understand the role of social strategy not only in building companies’ competitive advantage but also in developing industries. Scholars of industrial evolution, such as organizational ecologists (e.g., Hannan, Pólos, and Carroll, 2007) and researchers of product life cycles (e.g., Klepper, 1996) and dominant design (e.g., Benner and Tripsas, 2012), may find this book appealing, because social strategy may play an important role in the evolution of both new and traditional industries. For example, recent research in organizational ecology suggests that producers may facilitate identity building and legitimation processes in new industries by engaging their audiences to convert the intrinsic appeal of producers’ offerings into actual appeal (Hannan, 2010). Specific forms of engagement, however, have remained underexplored (Verhaal, Khessina, and Dobrev, 2015). Piskorski suggests that one way companies could successfully engage their audiences is by means of social strategy: producers may engage audiences socially and in this way increase the actual appeal of their offerings. Empirical research could investigate whether such social engagement is effective for identity building andASQ_v60n4_Dec2015_cover.indd legitimation processes at both organizational and industry levels, whether new or existing companies are more likely to benefit from social engagement, what role social engagement plays in long-term industrial dynamics, and other interesting questions.

You can read the rest of the review from Administrative Science Quarterly for free by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research and reviews like this from Administrative Science QuarterlyClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

Using Social Marketing in China to Reduce the Spread of Cysticerosis

tap-1564536[We’re pleased to welcome Mary Dickey of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Dr. Dickey recently published “Program Evaluation of a Sanitation Marketing Campaign Among the Bai in China: A Strategy for Cysticercosis Reduction” with Robert John, Helene Carabin, and Xiao-Nong Zhou in Social Marketing Quarterly.]

I saw first-hand the problems with sanitation through my involvement in community development work in rural China. Although emphasis is often placed on new technology in sanitation, I observed that promoting behavioral change was the real challenge. Poor sanitation causes many diseases and one that was of special interest to me was cysticercosis. Cysticercosis is a leading cause of epilepsy among the Bai minority group in Yunnan, China.

I found that many among the Bai already understood the relationship between sanitation and disease but F1.mediumthat understanding did not seem to affect toilet construction and use. Since health education alone did not seem to be an answer, we researched the use of sanitation marketing among the Bai. This research reveals how formative data was collected to help researchers understand not only the sanitation situation but also the thoughts and opinions of the Bai related to toilet use. This data was used to design a social marketing campaign to promote toilets with the specific goal of reducing cysticercosis. The results of the campaign in two intervention villages are compared with the results of a more conventional government promotion in two comparison villages. This is the first report of the use of social marketing of toilets in China. Although more research is needed, this program evaluation indicates that sanitation marketing in rural China is an appropriate approach to increase sanitation coverage.

You can read “Program Evaluation of a Sanitation Marketing Campaign Among the Bai in China: A Strategy for Cysticercosis Reduction” from Social Marketing Quarterly for free by clicking here. Don’t forget to sign up for e-alerts and get all the latest news and research from Social Marketing Quarterly sent directly to your inbox!

Top Five: Social Marketing

CaptureThe 4th World Social Marketing Conference takes place in Sydney, Australia starting this Sunday.

According to the conference website, the mission of the World Social Marketing Conference is to act as a vehicle to help build a global movement dedicated to capturing, spreading and nurturing good practice in Social Marketing, as well as increase the efficiency and effectiveness of Social Marketing practice at both operational and strategic levels. Keynote speakers include Ashfaq Rahman of the Social Marketing Company, author Joel Bakan, Roberto Venturini of the State Government of Victoria’s Department of Health and Human Services, and Adrian Bauman of University of Sydney.

To celebrate the World Social Marketing Conference, we’re pleased to bring you the current top five most-read articles from Social Marketing Quarterly. These articles are available to read for free through the month of April.

“Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Understand Texting While Driving and Guide Communication Campaigns Against It” by Magdalena Cismaru from March 2014

home_cover“Social Marketing: A Systematic Review of Research 1998–2012” by V. Dao Truong from March 2014

“What Can Social Marketers Learn From the Accomplishments of Behavioral Economics?” by Lynne Doner Lotenberg published in OnlineFirst on February 26, 2015

“Smokey the Bear Should Come to the Beach: Using Mascot to Promote Marine Conservation” by Daniel Hayden and Benjamin Dills from March 2015

“Social Marketing and If You Can’t Fix It, Feature It! by Moshe Engelberg, Teresa Sanchez, and Jessa Engelberg from March 2015

You can have all the latest research from Social Marketing Quarterly sent directly to your inbox. Click here to sign up for e-alerts! Social Marketing Quarterly is now on Twitter! Follow them at @SMQJournal.