Read the November 2016 Issue of Journal of Management!

3340359442_b93f0f9aa9_o-1The November 2016 issue of Journal of Management is now available online, and can be accessed for the next 30 days! The November issue covers a variety of topics, including articles on organizational transparency, shared leadership-team performance relations, and the effects of autonomy on team performance.

Authors Anthony J. Nyberg, Jenna R. Pieper, and Charlie O. Trevor contributed the article “Pay-for-Performance’s Effect on Future Employee Performance: Integrating Psychological and Economic Principles Toward a Contingency Perspective,” which suggests that bonus pay may have a stronger effect on future performance than merit pay, among other findings about pay-for-performance. The abstract for the paper:

Although pay-for-performance’s potential effect on employee performance is a compelling issue, understanding this dynamic has been constrained by narrow approaches to pay-for-performance conceptualization, measurement, and surrounding conditions. In response, we take a more nuanced perspective by integrating fundamental principles of economics and psychology to identify and incorporate employee characteristics, job characteristics, pay system Current Issue Covercharacteristics, and pay system experience into a contingency model of the pay-for-performance–future performance relationship. We test the role that these four key contextual factors play in pay-for-performance effectiveness using 11,939 employees over a 5-year period. We find that merit and bonus pay, as well as their multiyear trends, are positively associated with future employee performance. Furthermore, our findings indicate that, contrary to what traditional economic perspectives would predict, bonus pay may have a stronger effect on future performance than merit pay. Our results also support a contingency approach to pay-for-performance’s impact on future employee performance, as we find that merit pay and bonus pay can substitute for each other and that the strength of pay-for-performance’s effect is a function of employee tenure, the pay-for-performance trend over time, and job type (presumably due to differences in the measurability of employee performance across jobs).

Another article from the issue, entitled “Social Media for Selection? Validity and Adverse Impact Potential of a Facebook-Based Assessment” from authors Chad H. Van Iddekinge, Stephen E. Lanivich, Philip L. Roth, and Elliott Junco delves into the hazards that arise when recruiters use social media platforms like Facebook to screen job applicants. The abstract for the paper:

Recent reports suggest that an increasing number of organizations are using information from social media platforms such as Facebook.com to screen job applicants. Unfortunately, empirical research concerning the potential implications of this practice is extremely limited. We address the use of social media for selection by examining how recruiter ratings of Facebook profiles fare with respect to two important criteria on which selection procedures are evaluated: criterion-related validity and subgroup differences (which can lead to adverse impact). We captured Facebook profiles of college students who were applying for full-time jobs, and recruiters from various organizations reviewed the profiles and provided evaluations. We then followed up with applicants in their new jobs. Recruiter ratings of applicants’ Facebook information were unrelated to supervisor ratings of job performance (rs = −.13 to –.04), turnover intentions (rs = −.05 to .00), and actual turnover (rs = −.01 to .01). In addition, Facebook ratings did not contribute to the prediction of these criteria beyond more traditional predictors, including cognitive ability, self-efficacy, and personality. Furthermore, there was evidence of subgroup difference in Facebook ratings that tended to favor female and White applicants. The overall results suggest that organizations should be very cautious about using social media information such as Facebook to assess job applicants.

You can read these articles and more from the November 2016 issue of Journal of Management, which is free for the next 30 days, by clicking here to view the issue’s table of contents! Want to stay current on all of the latest research published by Journal of Management? Click here to sign up for e-alerts to receive notifications for new issues and Online First articles!

*City image attributed to Mark Goebel (CC)

Read the New Issue of Journal of Management Education!

10740098824_efe1d316b7_zThe October 2016 issue of Journal of Management Education is now available online, and can be accessed free for the next 30 days. The October issue features a new provocative conversation for the article “Isn’t It Time We Did Something About the Lack of Teaching Preparation in Business Doctoral Programs?” by authors Robert D. Marx, Joseph E. Garcia, D. Anthony Butterfield, Jeffrey A. Kappen, and Timothy T. Baldwin. The rejoinders for the article include rejoinders from Roy J. Lewicki, James Bailey, Graham Gibbs, Dianne Minh Le, and Denise M. Rousseau.

In the rejoinder “A Deeper Dig,” Roy J. Lewicki and James Current Issue CoverBailey delve into the supply side, demand side, and throughput process of management doctoral programs to fully understand the lack of teaching preparation. Their rejoinder suggests that institutions would be resistant to the suggested changes, but a shift in the supply and demand for skilled teachers could potentially force the hand of institutions to address this issue.

In the rejoinder “On the Call for Action,” Dianne Le discusses the role of AACSB and hiring institutions in addressing the lack of teaching preparation. Her rejoinder raises the question of when and where teacher training should begin, considering teaching expectations differ quite a bit from one institution to the next.

You can read all of the rejoinders and more from the October 2016 issue of Journal of Management Education free for the next 30 days–click here to view the table of contents! You can also read through past provocative conversations published on the Journal of Management Education website here.

Want to stay current on all of the latest research and rejoinders published by Journal of Management Education? Click here to sign up for e-alerts! 

*Lecture image attributed to University of Liverpool (CC)

Read the New Issue of Administrative Science Quarterly!

Current Issue CoverThe June 2016 issue of Administrative Science Quarterly is now available online and can be accessed free for the next 30 days. The June issue includes articles covering a range of topics, including an article that explores why cultural omnivores get creative jobs, and an article on task segregation as a mechanism for within-job gender inequality. William Starbuck’s piece, “60th Anniversary Essay: How Journals Could Improve Research Practices in Social Science” opens the new issue by exploring how improvements can be made to editorial policies to make research practices in the social sciences more accurate and reliable. The abstract for the paper:

This essay proposes ways to improve editorial evaluations of manuscripts and to make published research more reliable and trustworthy. It points to troublesome properties of current editorial practices and suggests that editorial evaluations could become more reliable by making more allowance for reviewers’ human limitations. The essay also identifies some troublesome properties of prevalent methodology, such as statistical significance tests, HARKing, and p-Hacking, and proposes editorial policies to mitigate these detrimental behaviors.

Click here to access the table of contents for the June 2016 issue of Administrative Science Quarterly. Want to know about all the latest from Administrative Science Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

The March Issue of Public Personnel Management is Now Online!

4202408267_63ce65b910_zThe March 2016 issue of Public Personnel Management is now available and is free to access for the next 30 days. The March issue features an editorial from Jared Llorens, the incoming editor of Public Personnel Management, as well as an introduction from guest editor Linda Sun for the second part of an article collection on Humanisitic Management and Development of New Cities and Towns. Among the articles included in this issue is a piece from author Jun Yi Hsieh, entitled “Spurious or True? An Exploration of Antecedents and Simultaneity of Job Performance and Job Satisfaction Across the Sectors,” which compares public, private, and nonprofit employees to see if the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance differs in each sector. The abstract from the paper:

The purpose of this study is to test differences and similarities of the public, private, ppm coverand nonprofit sector employees by examining the antecedents and simultaneity of job satisfaction and job performance. The results, assessed by seemingly unrelated regression, showed that job satisfaction positively affects job performance, or vice versa. Explanatory variables such as goal ambiguity, leader–member exchange, and so forth also exerted significant effects on the outcome variables across three sectors. This study extends to explain the similarity and difference of three sectors based on the criteria of the values in common, outcome variation, task characteristics, and sector contexts.

Click here to access the table of contents for the March 2016 issue of Public Personnel ManagementWant to know all about the latest from Public Personnel ManagementClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Coworkers image credited to Alger Cugun (CC)

The March Issue of World Future Studies is Now Online!

8371340296_1181947d22_zThe March 2016 issue of World Future Review is now available and can be read online for free for the next 30 days. The March issue includes articles that delve into future studies’ curriculum and the breadth of future studies in relation to climate change. In the article, “Understanding the Breadth of Studies through a Dialogue with Climate Change,” author Jennifer M. Gidley discusses how climate change and an evolutionary perspective provide a framework to think about developments in future studies. The abstract for her paper:

This article explores the breadth of the futures studies field by creating a dialogue with some prominent approaches to climate change. The first half of the article takes an evolutionary perspective on the development of the futures studies field. I show how developments in the field parallel the broader epistemological shift from the WFR Orange Covercentrality of positivism to a plurality of postpositivist approaches particularly in the social sciences. Second, I explore the current scientific research on climate change including issues related to mitigation, adaptation, and coevolution. Finally, I apply my futures typology that includes five paradigmatic approaches to undertake a dialogue between futures studies and climate change.

Click here to access the table of contents for the March 2016 issue of World Future Review. Want to know about all the latest from World Future ReviewClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Iceberg image credited to Christopher Michel (CC)

The American Economist Is Now Online!

AEX_72ppiRGB_powerpointWe’re pleased to announce that The American Economist is now online with a new, special March 2016 issue! The special issue takes a look back at some of The American Economist‘s most influential articles, each with a new Editor’s Introduction. Editor-in-Chief Paul Grimes introduces the special issue:

This edition of The American Economist marks a new chapter in the history of the journal and its sponsoring organization, Omicron Delta Epsilon, The International Honor Society in Economics. For more than five decades, Omicron Delta Epsilon self-published the journal using a variety of university presses and contract printers to physically produce and distribute the journal to members of the society, individual subscribers, and libraries around the world. Its deep red cover and distinctive title wordmark became iconic symbols within the economics profession. Although the size and format of the journal evolved over time, the journal was produced only in a hardcopy format—until this issue. With Volume 61, Number 1, Spring 2016, The American Economist enters the digital age of journal publication…

Omicron Delta Epsilon recently celebrated its 100th birthday and The American Economistrecently passed the 50th anniversary of its association with the honor society. As we move past these important milestones and into the digital future, it is fitting that we take the time to look back on the journal’s valuable legacy. This issue opens with a bibliographic history of The American Economist that chronicles the journal’s path from a student-edited and student-produced annual publication into a well-respected academic journal with a global readership. The history is followed by the republication of 12 classic articles from the journal’s backfile. These curated articles were selected to provide readers with a feel of The American Economist’s rich heritage of publishing original work by some of the world’s most prominent economists. Papers by Milton Friedman, Paul Samuelson, John Kenneth Galbraith, Robert Solow, and Elinor Ostrom are included here, among others. Each article opens with a new Editor’s Introduction to set the paper and the author into its proper context.

In honor of the impressive legacy of The American Economist, we Nobels_fredspris,_medalje_-_no-nb_digifoto_20160310_00042_NB_NS_NM_10016are pleased to present a special collection of articles from the journal that we written by Nobel Peace Prize winning authors. You can read the special collection from The American Economist free for the next 30 days by clicking here.

To read the March 2016 special issue, also free for the next 30 days, click here. Want to know all about the latest research from The American Economist? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

The March Issue of Administrative Science Quarterly is Now Online!

ASQ CoverThe March issue of Administrative Science Quarterly is now available and can be read online for free for the next 30 days. The March issue includes a diverse group of articles, including an article reviewing how distributed attention and shared emotions contributed to the downfall of Nokia, and an article reflecting on how specializing in investment banking may lead to negative returns for MBA graduates.

The lead article, “60th Anniversary Essay: Ruminations on How We Became a Mystery House and How We Might Get Out” from Stephen R. Barley celebrates Administrative Science Quarterly‘s 60th anniversary  and details the current state of research in organizational theory.

The abstract from the paper:

This essay responds to, largely concurs with, and extends the concerns Jerry Davis expressed in his June 2015 editorial essay in ASQ about the state of research in organizational theory. In particular, it discusses the reasons novelty has become such a valued commodity in organizational theory and its unintended consequences. Fault lies with the way students are trained, the reward system that most universities implicitly or explicitly use to promote faculty, and the role that editors and reviewers play in wittingly or unwittingly rewarding the quest for novelty in the peer-review process. One way to revitalize organization theory while also addressing such problems would be for the researchers to begin to focus on the myriad ways that organizations shape our society and for organizational theorists to begin to collaborate with engineers and researchers in schools of public policy who are more aware of and interested in addressing problems that organizations, especially profit-making firms, create as they seek to shape their own environments.

Click here to access the table of contents for the March 2016 issue of Administrative Science Quarterly. Want to know about all the latest from Administrative Science Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!