Celebrating the launch of JSCAN – the Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiations!

JSCAN image 3On the 16th of June, we celebrated the launch of the Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiations (JSCAN) the official journal of the International Association for Contract and Commercial Management (IACCM). The SAGE editorial team joined members of the IACCM and the JSCAN editorial team at the Hurlingham Club in London to mark the publication of the journal’s inaugural issue in style.

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JSCAN co-Editor Tyrone S. Pistis

The event was held in conjunction with the IACCM Europe forum, the IACCM’s annual European meeting, and conference delegates were invited to attend the launch party. With summer arriving in London, it was the perfect evening for an outdoor celebration, with a barbeque buffet, music, speeches and drinks. Tim Cummins, CEO of IACCM, welcomed everyone, introduced the journal, and talked about JSCAN Editor Tyrone S. Pistis’s initial journal idea and the collaboration with SAGE. Tyrone in turn spoke about the background for the journal, and its aims and scope, and Caroline Lock, Publisher at SAGE, talked warmly of the collaboration with IACCM, a highlight of SAGE 50th anniversary celebrations.

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IACCM CEO Tim Cummins and SAGE Publisher Caroline Lock

The aims of JSCAN is to provide an outlet for research and theory about practices that challenge the status quo in strategic contracting and negotiations, and the commercial implementation of business strategy and policy. The journal will also address the impact of contracting and negotiations on trust and ethics in business. JSCAN is open for submissions, and details of the call for papers can be found here.

Submit Your Research to Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation

jscanWe are pleased to announce a new journal launching in spring 2015, Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation, the official journal of the International Association for Contract and Commercial Management (IACCM).

Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation is an international refereed journal publishing research and theory about practices that challenge the status quo in strategic contracting and negotiations.

Editors:

Usha C. V. Haley, West Virginia University, USA
Tyrone S. Pitsis, Newcastle University, UK; The University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
David M. Van Slyke, Syracuse University, USA

The journal welcomes submissions concerning theory, research and the practice of strategic contracting and negotiation. Multidisciplinary in nature, Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation welcomes articles from a wide range of disciplines. Possible submissions include articles on the following:

  • Papers that speak to the complexity of relational contracting
  • Papers that provide insights into performance based contracts
  • Papers that advance our understanding of contracting under complexity and ambiguity

Papers that explore the practices of negotiation as an ongoing process (not just something that happened until a contract is signed)

As a journal of the IACCM your work will also be translated into an executive summary for 8,000 of its members: giving you the opportunity for creating impact.
For more information on submitting to Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation please click here.

Get a Better Understanding of Climate Change Issues Through Simulation

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Global warming and climate change have become hot-button issues in the past few decades. Many disagree on the long-term effects and what needs to be done to correct it, if anything at all. In their article published in Simulation and Gaming, “WORLD CLIMATE: A Role-Play Simulation of Climate Negotiations,” collaborators John Sterman, Travis Franck, Thomas Fiddaman, Andrew Jones, Stephanie McCauley, Philip Rice, Elizabeth Sawin, Lori Siegel and Juliette N. Rooney-Varga suggest that communication issues are to blame and offer up a unique solution in the form of online simulation and role playing programs.

The abstract:

Global negotiations to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have so far failed to produce an agreement. Even if negotiations succeeded, however, a binding treaty could not be ratified or implemented in many nations due to inadequate public support for emissions reductions. The scientific consensus on the reality and risks of anthropogenic climate change has never been stronger, yet public S&G_2013_C1.inddsupport for action in many nations remains weak. Policymakers, educators, the media, civic and business leaders, and citizens need tools to understand the dynamics and geopolitical implications of climate change. The WORLD CLIMATE simulation provides an interactive role-play experience through which participants explore these issues using a scientifically sound climate policy simulation model. Participants playing the roles of negotiators from major nations and stakeholders negotiate proposals to reduce GHG emissions. Participants then receive immediate feedback on the implications of their proposals for atmospheric GHG concentrations, global mean surface temperature, sea level rise, and other impacts through the C-ROADS (Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support) policy simulation model used by negotiators and policymakers. The role-play enables participants to explore the dynamics of the climate and impacts
of proposed policies using a model consistent with the best available peer-reviewed science. WORLD CLIMATE has been used successfully with students, teachers, business executives, and political leaders around the world. Here, we describe protocols for the role-play and the resources available to run it, including C-ROADS and all needed materials, all freely available at climateinteractive.org. We also present evaluations of the impact of WORLD CLIMATE with diverse groups.

Read “WORLD CLIMATE: A Role-Play Simulation of Climate Negotiations” in Simulation and Gaming for free by clicking here.

Don’t miss out on other articles like this! Click here to sign up for e-alerts from Simulation and Gaming.

What Is It Like To Have Power?

The latest issue of Administrative Science Quarterly, Social Psychological Perspectives on Power and Hierarchy, takes the study of power in management and organizational behavior to a new level.

Click here to access all articles in this special issue.

Exploring the psychological experience of power in the workplace, these articles follow the path of the power-seeker who becomes an opportunist in exchange relationships, and delve into the phenomenon of “illusory power transference”—the feeling of power that comes from being near a powerful other. They explain why the most audacious risk-takers in the social hierarchy are those with “something to lose” or “nothing to gain,” and ask why women in high-power positions still take the floor less than their male counterparts do.

As stated in the introductory essay by guest editors Francis J. Flynn and Deborah Gruenfeld, both of Stanford University, Linda D. Molm of the University of Arizona, and Jeffrey T. Polzer of Harvard University:

In the past, researchers who study power in organizations have typically focused their attention on identifying important antecedents and consequences—what serves as a source of power and what happens when power is used? More recently, a firestorm of research in psychology has investigated a different question that is of great interest to micro-organizational behavior scholars: What is it like to have power? More specifically, how does power affect the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of its possessors and their peers? The psychology of power, once the subject of mere conjecture and speculation, now serves as the target of direct empirical investigation.

Administrative Science Quarterly is a top-rank, quarterly, peer-reviewed journal that publishes the best theoretical and empirical papers on organizational studies from dissertations and the evolving, new work of more established scholars, as well as interdisciplinary work in organizational theory, and informative book reviews. To learn more about the journal, please click here.

Are you interested in receiving email alerts whenever a new article becomes available online? Then follow this link!

The Pursuit of Power Corrupts

Deepak Malhotra and Francesca Gino, both of Harvard University, published “The Pursuit of Power Corrupts: How Investing in Outside Options Motivates Opportunism in Relationships” on March 12, 2012 in Administrative Science Quarterly. To view other OnlineFirst articles, please click here.

The abstract:

Across three laboratory studies, this paper illustrates how a common strategic decision aimed at increasing one’s own power—investing in outside options—can lead to opportunistic behavior in exchange relationships. We show that the extent to which individuals have invested in creating outside options increases the likelihood that they will exploit their current exchange partners, even after controlling for the leverage provided by the outside options. Our results demonstrate that having previously sunk investments in an outside option leads to a heightened sense of entitlement, even when the outside option has been foregone. In turn, feelings of entitlement result in higher aspirations for what is to be gained in the current relationship, and these aspirations fuel opportunism. Finally, we show that other parties may fail to anticipate these effects, leaving them vulnerable to exploitation.

To learn more about Administrative Science Quarterly, please follow this link.

Are you interested in receiving email alerts whenever a new article or issue becomes available? Then click here!

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