JOM Wins Awards at AOM 2017!

Patrick WrightSAGE is excited to congratulate JOM on winning multiple awards at AOM 2017. Congratulations to former editor of the Journal of Management, Patrick M. Wright, for winning the Career Achievement Award.

 

JOM_42_5_Covers.inddAnd congratulations to authors Anthony J. Nyberg, Jenna R. Pieper, and Charlie O. Trevor for their paper,  “Pay-for-Performance’s Effect on Future Employee Performance Integrating Psychological and Economic Principles Toward a Contingency Perspective,which received the HRM Division Scholarly Achievement Award for best paper from 2016.”

 

For more information on the Journal of Management visit the journal homepage where you can sign up for email alerts and keep up to date!

Read the November 2016 Issue of Journal of Management!

3340359442_b93f0f9aa9_o-1The November 2016 issue of Journal of Management is now available online, and can be accessed for the next 30 days! The November issue covers a variety of topics, including articles on organizational transparency, shared leadership-team performance relations, and the effects of autonomy on team performance.

Authors Anthony J. Nyberg, Jenna R. Pieper, and Charlie O. Trevor contributed the article “Pay-for-Performance’s Effect on Future Employee Performance: Integrating Psychological and Economic Principles Toward a Contingency Perspective,” which suggests that bonus pay may have a stronger effect on future performance than merit pay, among other findings about pay-for-performance. The abstract for the paper:

Although pay-for-performance’s potential effect on employee performance is a compelling issue, understanding this dynamic has been constrained by narrow approaches to pay-for-performance conceptualization, measurement, and surrounding conditions. In response, we take a more nuanced perspective by integrating fundamental principles of economics and psychology to identify and incorporate employee characteristics, job characteristics, pay system Current Issue Covercharacteristics, and pay system experience into a contingency model of the pay-for-performance–future performance relationship. We test the role that these four key contextual factors play in pay-for-performance effectiveness using 11,939 employees over a 5-year period. We find that merit and bonus pay, as well as their multiyear trends, are positively associated with future employee performance. Furthermore, our findings indicate that, contrary to what traditional economic perspectives would predict, bonus pay may have a stronger effect on future performance than merit pay. Our results also support a contingency approach to pay-for-performance’s impact on future employee performance, as we find that merit pay and bonus pay can substitute for each other and that the strength of pay-for-performance’s effect is a function of employee tenure, the pay-for-performance trend over time, and job type (presumably due to differences in the measurability of employee performance across jobs).

Another article from the issue, entitled “Social Media for Selection? Validity and Adverse Impact Potential of a Facebook-Based Assessment” from authors Chad H. Van Iddekinge, Stephen E. Lanivich, Philip L. Roth, and Elliott Junco delves into the hazards that arise when recruiters use social media platforms like Facebook to screen job applicants. The abstract for the paper:

Recent reports suggest that an increasing number of organizations are using information from social media platforms such as Facebook.com to screen job applicants. Unfortunately, empirical research concerning the potential implications of this practice is extremely limited. We address the use of social media for selection by examining how recruiter ratings of Facebook profiles fare with respect to two important criteria on which selection procedures are evaluated: criterion-related validity and subgroup differences (which can lead to adverse impact). We captured Facebook profiles of college students who were applying for full-time jobs, and recruiters from various organizations reviewed the profiles and provided evaluations. We then followed up with applicants in their new jobs. Recruiter ratings of applicants’ Facebook information were unrelated to supervisor ratings of job performance (rs = −.13 to –.04), turnover intentions (rs = −.05 to .00), and actual turnover (rs = −.01 to .01). In addition, Facebook ratings did not contribute to the prediction of these criteria beyond more traditional predictors, including cognitive ability, self-efficacy, and personality. Furthermore, there was evidence of subgroup difference in Facebook ratings that tended to favor female and White applicants. The overall results suggest that organizations should be very cautious about using social media information such as Facebook to assess job applicants.

You can read these articles and more from the November 2016 issue of Journal of Management, which is free for the next 30 days, by clicking here to view the issue’s table of contents! Want to stay current on all of the latest research published by Journal of Management? Click here to sign up for e-alerts to receive notifications for new issues and Online First articles!

*City image attributed to Mark Goebel (CC)

Announcing the Winners of JOM’s Best Paper and Scholarly Impact Award!

We are pleased to congratulate the 2016 Journal of Management Best Paper and Scholarly Current Issue CoverImpact Award winners, announced just recently at the Academy of Managment 2016 Annual Meeting.

The Scholarly Impact Award, given annually, recognizes work with a lasting impact on the academic community and beyond. Our congratulations to the following winners:

Scholarly Impact Award:
Christopher Zott, Raphel Amit, and Lorenzo Massa
“The Business Model: Recent Developments and Future Research”

Scholarly Impact Award:
Donald Lange, Peggy M. Lee, and Ye Dai
“Organizational Reputation: A Review”

Scholarly Impact Award:
Dirk Van Dierendonck
“Servant Leadership: A Review and Synthesis”

Scholarly Impact Award:
Suzanne T. Bell, Anton J. Villado, Marc A. Lukasik, Larisa Belau, Andrea L. Briggs
“Getting Specific About Demographic Diversity Variable and Team Performance Relationships: A Meta-Analysis”

Best Paper Award and Scholarly Impact Award:
Brian L. Connelly, S. Trevis Certo, R. Duane Ireland, and Christopher R. Reutzel
“Signaling Theory: A Review and Assessment”

To celebrate these award-winning papers, readers will be able to access the papers free for the next 30 days! Congratulations again to the authors from Management INK!

Visit SAGE @ AOM 2016!

AOMThe Academy of Management 2016 Annual Meeting is going on now in Anaheim! This year’s theme, Making Organizations Meaningful, is all about the extensive impact of an organizations purpose, value, and worth. Organizational meaningfulness is a rich area of research–organizations communicate meaning across a wide variety of mediums to a wide variety of audiences, with unique goals in mind. You can find the full program for this year’s conference, including the scheduled events that will speak to organizational meaningfulness, by clicking here.

If you’re attending AOM, don’t forget to stop by SAGE’s booths (, where we’ll have the latest scholarly research from  Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Management, Family Business Review and other top-tier SAGE journals, as well as plenty of friendly faces willing to answer all your publishing inquiries.

Whether or not you’ll be able to attend this year’s Academy of Management Annual Meeting, please feel free to peruse the latest from SAGE’s management and business journals represented at AOM:

ASQ_v59n3_Sept2014_cover.inddAdministrative Science Quarterly This top-tier journal regularly publishes the best theoretical and empirical papers based on dissertations and on the evolving and new work of more established scholars, as well as interdisciplinary work in organizational theory, and informative book reviews.

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Business & Society
In this fast-growing, ever-changing, and always challenging field of study, BAS is the only peer-reviewed scholarly journal devoted entirely to research, discussion, and analysis on the relationship between business and society.

 

FBR_C1_revised authors color.inddFamily Business Review provides a scholarly platform devoted exclusively to exploration of the dynamics of family-controlled enterprise, including firms ranging in size from the very large to the relatively small. FBR is focused not only the entrepreneurial founding generation, but also on family enterprises in the 2nd and 3rd generation and beyond, including some of the world’s oldest companies.

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Group and Organization Management
publishes a broad range of articles, including data-based research articles, research review reports, evaluation studies, action research reports, and critiques of research. In addition, GOM brings you articles examining a wide range of topics in organizations from an international and cross-cultural perspective.

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The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science JABS is continually breaking ground in its exploration of group dynamics, organization development, and social change, providing scholars the best in research, theory, and methodology, while also informing professionals and their clients.

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Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies produces high-quality, peer-reviewed research articles on leadership and organizational studies, focusing in particular on the intersection of these two areas of study.

 

Current Issue CoverJournal of Management is committed to publishing scholarly empirical and theoretical research articles that have a high impact on the management field as a whole and cover such field as business strategy and policy, entrepreneurship, human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational theory, and research methods.

JME_72ppiRGB_powerpointJournal of Management Education is dedicated to enhancing teaching and learning in the management and organizational disciplines. JME’s published articles reflect changes and developments in the conceptualization, organization, and practice of management education.

JMI_72ppiRGB_powerpointJournal of Management Inquiry is a leading journal for scholars and professionals in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and human resources. JMI explores ideas and builds knowledge in management theory and practice, with a focus on creative, nontraditional research, as well as, key controversies in the field.

07ORM13_Covers.inddOrganizational Research Methods  brings relevant methodological developments to a wide range of researchers in organizational and management studies and promotes a more effective understanding of current and new methodologies and their application in organizational settings.

5 Journals to Check Out During SAGE’s Free Online Access Period!

During the month of April, SAGE is offering new and returning users free access over 1.5 million articles from over 940 SAGE journals through a free trial! Ready to start reading SAGE content? Here are a few journals and articles you can look forward to reading when you sign up for the free trial:

Journal of Management

Current Issue CoverFrom Journal of Management, you can read high impact articles on management topics like entrepreneurship, organizational theory, research methods, and business strategy and policy. Published in 2014, “Innovation and Creativity in Organizations: A State-of-the-Science Review, Prospective Commentary, and Guiding Framework” from authors Neil Anderson, Kristina Potočnik, and Jing Zhou is a great example of the kind of work you’ll find in Journal of Management. The abstract from the paper:

Creativity and innovation in any organization are vital to its successful performance. The authors review the rapidly growing body of research in this area with particular attention to the period 2002 to 2013, inclusive. Conceiving of both creativity and innovation as being integral parts of essentially the same process, we propose a new, integrative definition. We note that research into creativity has typically examined the stage of idea generation, whereas innovation studies have commonly also included the latter phase of idea implementation. The authors discuss several seminal theories of creativity and innovation and then apply a comprehensive levels-of-analysis framework to review extant research into individual, team, organizational, and multilevel innovation. Key measurement characteristics of the reviewed studies are then noted. In conclusion, we propose a guiding framework for future research comprising 11 major themes and 60 specific questions for future studies.

 

Public Personnel Management

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From Public Personnel Management, you can expect to find in-depth articles on human resource management in the public sector. With your free trial, you can read the popular article “Are We There Yet? The State of Public Human Resource Management Research” from authors Todd Jordan and R. Paul Battaglio Jr. The abstract from the paper:

Beginning in 1996, the state of Georgia embarked on a bold experiment in public management reform, embracing employment at-will (EAW) for public employees. Public human resource management (PHRM) research since the Georgia reforms has called for a greater appreciation for the link between personnel reforms and performance. This research examines whether the appeal for more exacting research has been taken up. The analysis provides an overview of research on public personnel reform, focusing on five themes identified by the literature: decentralization, performance-based pay, declassification, deregulation, and privatization. Reviewing 238 articles in 13 journals since 1996, the present effort finds a lack of empirical evidence linking personnel reforms with results. The authors conclude with several perspectives for future assessments of PHRM reform and lessons for practice.

 

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Administrative Science Quarterly

From Administrative Science Quarterly, you will find top theoretical and empirical articles on organizational studies, like the recently published article “Whitened Resumes: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market” from authors Sonia K. Kang, Katherine A. DeCelles, András Tilcsik, and Sora Jun. The abstract from the paper:

Using interviews, a laboratory experiment, and a résumé audit study, we examine racial minorities’ attempts to avoid anticipated discrimination in labor markets by concealing or downplaying racial cues in job applications, a practice known as “résumé whitening.” Interviews with racial minority university students reveal that while some minority job seekers reject this practice, others view it as essential and use a variety of whitening techniques. Building on the qualitative findings, we conduct a lab study to examine how racial minority job seekers change their résumés in response to different job postings. Results show that when targeting an employer that presents itself as valuing diversity, minority job applicants engage in relatively little résumé whitening and thus submit more racially transparent résumés. Yet our audit study of how employers respond to whitened and unwhitened résumés shows that organizational diversity statements are not actually associated with reduced discrimination against unwhitened résumés. Taken together, these findings suggest a paradox: minorities may be particularly likely to experience disadvantage when they apply to ostensibly pro-diversity employers. These findings illuminate the role of racial concealment and transparency in modern labor markets and point to an important interplay between the self-presentation of employers and the self-presentation of job seekers in shaping economic inequality.

 

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Compensation & Benefits Review

From Compensation & Benefits Review, you can find comprehensive articles discussing the design, implementation, evaluation, and communication of benefits policies and programs. One popular article you can read during the free trial period is “The Future of Reward Management: From Total Reward Strategies to Smart Rewards” from author Duncan Brown. The abstract for the paper:

The author argues that the terminology and concept of “total rewards” is become increasingly meaningless and outdated in our postrecessionary economy of austerity and inequality. Its generic and unthinking application in uniform flexible benefits packages risks isolating the rewards profession into an administrative backwater. Instead he argues for a new approach that he provocatively titles “smart rewards,” following recent thinking and writing in economic and foreign policy on both sides of the Atlantic. He discerns four components of this emerging reward management approach: a simpler and clearer focus on a few core values and principles, a stronger basis in evidence and measurement, more emphasis on employee engagement through rewards and improved and more open communications and line management of reward. Brown concludes that adapting and tailoring this type of approach is much more likely to create the genuinely business-enhancing and employee-engaging reward practices in our contemporary context that reward professionals and their policies aspire to.

 

JLOS_72ppiRGB_powerpointJournal of Leadership & Organizational Studies

From Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studiesyou can read articles on all aspect of leadership and organization. Recently published, “Institutional Voids in an Emerging Economy: From Problem to Opportunity” from authors Daniel J. McCarthy and Sheila M. Puffer is a great article to read during your free trial access. The abstract for the paper:

Much has appeared in the literature about institutional voids, a component of institutional theory. Little has been written, however, about the effects of institutional voids on individuals in emerging market nations and how they might react in proactive ways, including leaving their home country problems to pursue opportunities elsewhere. This article focuses on how institutional voids can create opportunities not only for such individuals but also for the firms that they join and the national economies of their host countries. We illustrate this juxtaposition from problem to opportunity by providing background on institutional voids in Russia as well as the welcoming institutional environments experienced in the United States. We do so by presenting some early findings from a larger ongoing research project. We emphasize not only the individual successes of migrants we interviewed as they seized opportunities afforded by their substantial backgrounds but also the resulting benefits to the U.S. firms that they joined or founded, as well as to the U.S. innovation economy. As illustrations, we offer the profiles of three professionals who came from Russia around 2000. They are part of a much larger group that came from various countries of the former USSR whom we interviewed in the Silicon Valley and Boston–Cambridge innovation hubs.

SAGE Free Trial Banner

You can register for your free trial of SAGE content by clicking here. Once you sign up for the free trial, you will have free online access to all SAGE journal content until April 30th 2016. SAGE’s portfolio includes more than 940 journals spanning the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Science, Technology, and Medicine, and more than 400 are published on behalf of learned societies and institutions. Start your search today!

 

 

Machiavellian and Motivated: How Managers Can Turn Employee Selfishness into Pro-Organization Behavior

360px-Macchiavelli01Machiavelli famously argued that it is best to be both loved and feared, which is all good and well for a hypothetical prince, but what about for modern-day employees? Companies have long avoided employees who embody Machiavellian principles, labeling such behavior as selfish and manipulative. In their paper, “Leading Machiavellians: How to Translate Machiavellians’ Selfishness Into Pro-Organizational Behavior,” published in the November 2015 issue of Journal of Management, Frank D. Belschak of University of Amsterdam, Deanne N. Den Hartog of University of Amsterdam, and Karianne Kalshoven of Tilburg University challenge the notion that Machiavellian behavior should be discouraged and avoided. Rather, they argue that with the proper leader behavior, managers can transform Machiavellian behavior into proactive and productive organizational citizenship behavior.

The abstract:

Machiavellians are said to be manipulative JOM 41(3)_Covers.inddpeople who reduce the social capital of the organization. Yet some authors note that Machiavellians are also highly adaptive individuals who are able to contribute, cooperate, and use pro-social strategies when it is advantageous to them. Here we study whether transformational leader behavior can stimulate Machiavellian followers to engage in organizationally desirable behaviors such as challenging organizational citizenship behavior. We hypothesized and found in two multi-source field studies that transformational leadership moderates the relationship between Machiavellianism and challenging organizational citizenship behavior. In Study 2, we hypothesized a moderated mediation model and found that enhanced job autonomy and accompanying intrinsic motivation relating to transformational leadership explain (part of) the relationship between transformational leader behavior and challenging citizenship behavior of Machiavellian followers.

You can read “Leading Machiavellians: How to Translate Machiavellians’ Selfishness Into Pro-Organizational Behavior “ from Journal of Management by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Journal of Management? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Journal of Management Seeks Papers on Global Work in the Multinational Enterprise

global-team-895440-mJournal of Management invites scholars to submit research for an upcoming Special Issue entitled “Global Work in the Multinational Enterprise: New Avenues and Challenges for Strategically Managing Human Capital Across Borders.” The issue will be guest edited by David Allen of Rutgers University, Yih-teen Lee of IESE Business School at University of Navarra and Sebastian Reiche of IESE Business School at University of Navarra.

Journal of Management particularly welcome studies that apply wider theoretical lenses and multilevel approaches in order to better capture the JOM 41(3)_Covers.inddcomplexity of global work in multinational enterprises (MNE). Specifically, this special issue seeks to promote and shape the future direction for research addressing questions at the intersection of the following themes: (1) global work in MNEs – what structures, systems, and policies and practices do MNEs need to facilitate global work? (2) strategic HRM in MNEs – how does the system design and implementation fit an MNE’s global strategy?, and (3) global talent management in MNEs – how do we define, conceptualize, and identify global talent, and how do we manage it within multiple MNE contexts? Original empirical research, theory development, and meta-analytic reviews are all suitable for potential inclusion in the special issue.

Below is an illustrative list of topics that are consistent with the scope of the special issue, but other topics may be appropriate as well:

1. Global Work and the MNE:

  • What are the challenges for HRM given the growing fragmentation of forms of global work (e.g., corporate expatriation, self-initiated expatriation, business travel, virtual collaboration)?
  • How does global work affect the debate between global standardization vs. local adaptation of HR policies and practices, e.g. to which extent is a global compensation system needed, etc.
  • What are the key competencies for individuals to perform global work effectively? What are the corresponding HR practices to identify and develop them?
  • How to deal with the geographic dispersion (extent of coordination across borders needed) and multiculturalism/multilinguism (extent of coordination among people from diverse cultures and native languages needed) of global work?

2. Strategic HRM in the MNE:

  • How do institutional, cultural, and other contextual influences affect the development, implementation, and effectiveness of high performance work systems and practices in MNEs?
  • How should human resources be managed on a global scale (when to move jobs; where to move people; where to leverage local talent versus sourcing talent globally)?
  • How does centralization/localization strategy affect performance? How does global staffing strategy affect performance? What is the best staffing strategy for starting new multinational facilities (Taking over existing vs. turning around ongoing operations)?

3. Global Talent Management and the MNE:

  • To what extent do MNEs evaluate global talent issues (e.g., integrating national cultures; relative competencies across locations; availability of talent) in making cross-border acquisition decisions? To what extent do these factors affect cross-border acquisition success?
  • To what extent does the make-up of the top management team (in terms of national origin and experiences) affect MNE success and cross-border acquisition strategies/decisions?
  • What are strategic issues in forming and managing multinational teams?

Please submit papers through the journal’s online submission system. To do so, please click here, create your user account (if you have not done so already), and for “Manuscript Type” choose the corresponding Special Issue. You will be able to submit your paper for this Special Issue between the 1st and the 30th of September 2016.

For more information, including submission timeline and contact information, click here. Want to know about all the latest news and research from Journal of Management? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!