The Effect of Workplace Inspections on Worker Safety

Ling Li of the University of Wisconsin– Parkside and Perry Singleton of Syracuse University recently published in article in the ILR Review entitled, “The Effect of Workplace Inspections on Worker Safety,” which is free to read for a limited time. The abstract for the article is below:

ilra_71_4_coverThe US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enforces safety regulations through workplace inspections. The authors estimate the effect of inspections on worker safety by exploiting a feature of OSHA’s Site-Specific Targeting plan. The program targeted establishments for inspection if their baseline case rate exceeded a cutoff. This approach generated a discontinuous increase in inspections, which the authors exploit for identification. Using the fuzzy regression discontinuity model, they find that inspections decrease the rate of cases that involve days away from work, job restrictions, and job transfers in the calendar year immediately after the inspection cycle. They find no effect for other case rates or in subsequent years. Effects are most evident in manufacturing and less evident in health services, the largest two-digit industries represented in the data.

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Macro-Social Marketing and Gun Violence in America

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Traditionally marketing has focused on how to change individual’s behavior in order to buy a product. What media strategies can increase sales, and how to associate values with products? With the advent of the social marketing fields, analysis focused on how conventional marketing tools could be used to change behavior to improve one’s well being and address social problems. While there is a wealth of literature that looks at how government agencies can utilize marketing tools to effect individuals engaged in certain behavior, there has been little research on how NGO’s utilize the same tools to alter behavior and invoke policy changes.

Researchers and Authors Aimee Dinnin Huff, Michelle Barnhart, Brandon McAlexander, and Jim McAlexander perform a pertinent expansion of this field by  looking at how American Gun Violence Prevention groups (GVPGS) act as macro-social marketers.

They recently published in article in the Journal of Macromarketing entitled, “Addressing the Wicked Problem of American Gun Violence: Consumer Interest Groups as Macro-social Marketers,” which is free to read for a limited time. The abstract for the article is below:

Building on work on social and macro-social marketing, we provide an empirical account of ways in which American gun violence prevention groups (GVPGs) act as macro-social marketers as they address the wicked problem of gun violence, which they define as deaths and injuries with firearms. We find that, as a collective, GVPGs attempt to change the culture related to guns by targeting up-, mid-, and downstream agents. We contribute to theory by (1) expanding the concept of macro- social marketing beyond government entities to include consumer interest groups and collectives; (2) introducing internal marketing as a macro-social marketing tool critical for macro-social marketers dependent largely on volunteers; (3) elucidating ways that macro-social marketers can accomplish upstream changes indirectly, by encouraging consumers and citizens to influence policy makers; and (4) revealing marketing tactics that can be leveraged across up-, mid-, downstream, and internal efforts.

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Book Review: New Strategies for Social Innovation: Market-Based Approaches for Assisting the Poor

515PTSxE02L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Steven G. Anderson: New Strategies for Social Innovation: Market-Based Approaches for Assisting the Poor. New York: Columbia University Press, 344 pp. $105.00 (hardcover), $31.50 (paperback), $29.79 (Kindle Edition), ISBN-13: 978-0231159227

Satyam of the Indian Institute of Management in Lucknow, India recently reviewed Steven G. Anderson’s book on strategies for assisting the poor in developing countries, available now in the OnlineFirst section of Journal of Macromarketing.

Different perspectives on which developmental approach is the best to tackle the problems of the poor have been JMMK_new C1 template.indddebated, while change agents have been trying to address this issue in various ways. The answer lies in finding solutions to more fundamental questions including: What are some of the best ways to assist the poor in developing countries; which development strategies have better chances of success in a particular context and why; what are the strengths and limitations of these social change approaches; and what is the way forward?

Professor Steven G. Anderson, Director of School of Social Work at Michigan State University, draws upon his four decades of expertise as academician as well as practitioner and attempts to answer these questions in his latest book, New Strategies for Social Innovation: Market-Based Approaches for Assisting the Poor. His book takes the readers through four broad social development approaches that emphasize diverse market-based strategies to improve the life of disadvantaged groups. The book contains seven chapters and is just above three hundred pages in length. The chapters are organized around the approaches described by the author and towards the end an attempt is made to integrate these overarching approaches along with a comparative analysis.

You can read the rest of the review from Journal of Macromarketing for free by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research and reviews from Journal of Macromarketing? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Do You Have Research on Macro-Social Marketing?

browsing-in-pink-453218-mJournal of Macromarketing is now accepting research for the Special Issue on Macro-Social Marketing! This Special Issue will be guest edited by Ann-Marie Kennedy and Andrew Parsons, both of Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.

Macro-Social Marketing goes beyond single campaigns for individual behavior change. This is a relatively new area in the literature and many areas of development are possible. Manuscripts could examine the use of macro-social marketing for systemic change, government sponsored social marketing and the ethical ramifications of social marketing. How social marketing relates to sustainability, development, quality of life and history could also be considered.

Empirical, conceptual and theoretical contributions are invited on (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • Macro-social marketing campaigns and their outcomes
  • JMMK_new C1 template.inddGovernment sponsored social marketing
  • Ethical implications of macro-social marketing and social marketing in general
  • Macro-social marketing’s effect on quality of life
  • Historical analyses of long term social marketing campaigns
  • Cross-country influences of social marketing campaigns
  • How social marketing relates to sustainability
  • The place of social media and virtual worlds in macro-social marketing
  • Effects of macro-social marketing in developing countries
  • Social entrepreneurship/social enterprise and macro-social marketing
  • Public policy implications of macro-social marketing

This Special Issue is tentatively scheduled for September 2017, but completed manuscripts must by received no later than February 28, 2016!

For more information, including where to submit and contact information, click here! Want to know about all the latest news like this from Journal of Macromarketing? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

A Cornucopia of Book Reviews!

Looking for holiday gift ideas or just a good read to relax with over the long weekend? We’ve provided you with three insightful book reviews to sink your teeth into.

80140100838090LSaru Jayaraman. Behind the Kitchen Door. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press/ILR Press, 2013. 208 pp. ISBN 978-0-8014-7951-9. $15.95 (Paperback).

Read the review by Janice Fine of Rutgers University, published in the October 2014 issue of ILR Review:

Behind the Kitchen Door is a powerful exposé of the labor practices of the contemporary restaurant industry intended to make the case that the treatment of workers is at least as instrumental to theILR_72ppiRGB_powerpoint goals of the burgeoning sustainable food movement as free-range chickens, grass-fed cows, or organic, locally sourced, non-GMO produce. Written by Saru Jayaraman, co-founder of the Restaurant Opportunities Center of New York (ROC-NY), which is the organization that emerged in the aftermath of the tragic deaths of 73 workers at the iconic Windows on the World restaurant on 9/11, the book is a trove of information about industry structure and employment practices.

9781780323091Órla Ryan. Chocolate Nations: Living and Dying for Cocoa in West Africa. London and New York: Zed Books, 2011. 182 pp. ISBN 978-184813-005-0. $14.95 (Paperback).

Franklin Obeng-Odoom of the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia published his review in Review of Radical Radical Political Economics.

This book is interesting, but strange. It is hard to dismiss, but difficult to call a masterpiece. The RRPE_v46_72ppiRGB_powerpointbook talks about two countries without being comparative, but in a way that helps comparative studies and thinking. This is a book about the raw material that is used to produce the chocolate you have been eating, about the fair trade you have been supporting, and about how the output of smallholder farmers acts as steroids for the economies of entire nations.

9781442208742_p0_v2_s260x420Wallach, Jennifer Jensen. How America Eats: A Social History of U.S. Food and Culture. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2013. 240 pp. ISBN-13: 978-1442232188. $24.95 (paperback list).

13122087Bobrow-Strain, Aaron. White Bread: A Social History of the Store-bought Loaf. Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 2012. 257 pp. ISBN-13: 978-0807044780. $17.00 (paperback list).

Kim K. McKeage of Hamline University wrote a review of both of these books, which appeared in the Journal of Macromarketing.

From the titles, we get a hint that How America Eats: A Social History of U.S. Food and Culture and JMMK_new C1 template.inddWhite Bread: A Social History of the Store-bought Loaf occupy opposite ends of a spectrum. Both are social histories, and both are concerned with food, but one is a wide-ranging history of all things food related, while the other focuses on one item – commercial white bread. How America Eats is a rather impersonal account, while White Bread is embedded in the author’s own experiences and ethos. The differences in perspective, though, provide what turn out to be remarkably similar insights into American food history.

Happy reading!

Journal of Macromarketing Call for Papers

The Journal of Macromarketing has announced two new Calls for Papers.

The first Call for Papers is for the 37th Annual Macromarketing Conference, which takes place in Germany between June 13 and June 16, 2012. The conference theme is “Sustainable Development of Markets and Marketing Systems in a Globalized World.”

The conference will focus on the following fields:

• Marketing systems in service economies
• Marketing systems in business-to-business markets
• Transactions and relationships as buildings blocks of market processes
• Theories and meta-theories of markets and marketing
• Market making and marketing in emergent economies / developing countries
• Marketing ethics
• Practices in markets and marketing systems
• Service-dominant logic of marketing
• Cultural influences on marketing systems and market making
• Sustainable business models
• Global innovation
• Beyond that papers in all established macromarketing fields of study are invited

Submissions of papers should be sent no later than Monday, January 9, 2012.

Proposals for special sessions should be sent no later than Monday, January 9, 2012 and must include a rationale, an outline of the issues to be discussed, as well as names and relevant qualifications of the proposed panel, workshop and session participants.

For more information about the Call for Papers, the Proposals for Special Sessions, or the conference, please click here.

The second Call for Papers is for the Fourth Subsistence Marketplaces Conference, which will focus on the theme of “Subsistence Marketplaces to Sustainable Marketplaces: From Micro-level Insights to Macro-Level Impact.” It will take place in Chicago, Illinois between July 27 and 29, 2012.

A few suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Consumers and Sellers in Subsistence Marketplaces
  • Environmental Sustainability and Subsistence
  • Business Practices in Subsistence Marketplaces
  • Economic and Financial Perspectives on Subsistence Marketplaces
  • Health, Well-being and Justice in Subsistence Marketplaces
  • Social Innovations for Subsistence Marketplaces
  • Management Education on Subsistence Marketplaces

Submission Deadline for Three-Page Abstract: January 31, 2012

E-mail as a Word document to Madhu Viswanathan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign at mviswana@illinois.edu, Cliff Shultz at cjs2@luc.edu, and Srinivas Sridharan at srinivas.sridharan@monash.edu.

They are currently exploring the possibility of a publication that is partially or fully based on articles stemming from presentations at the conference.

August 31, 2012 – Deadline for paper submission after incorporation of comments from conference participants and conference chairs

For more information about the Call for Papers, Submission for Publication, or the Conference, please click here.

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