How Has HR Become More Strategic and Integral to Businesses?

12669067945_e017b825c8_zIn today’s competitive and complex business environment, the role of human resources (HR) is constantly changing. With its increasing alignment to core business and integration to the bottom line, HR is a reflection of the constant changing nature of its functions. Being responsive to globalization, demographic and technological changes, as well as the turbulent, competitive and complex environment of business, HR itself has been changing dramatically. From the conventional role of “administrative expert,” HR has evolved to become more tactical and integral to business strategies.

A recent major change in the function of HR the strengthening partnership with line managers. By providing line managers better understanding of their responsibility in specific HR issues, such as absence control, team development, discipline, induction, health and safety, recruitment policy and performance management, HR aims to enhance Current Issue Coveremployee engagement and open communication between line managers and employees. These in turn lead to low turnover and high morale—keys to organizational performance and competitive success. In this regard, by replacing the traditional supervisory role of line managers and empowering them to act as leader, enabler and facilitator, HR is playing the strategic role of an “objective adviser”.

This change has made HR more strategic and more business integrated. This reorientation helps HR to not only play a critical role in the overall strategic planning of the business, but also to act as a messenger to clarify and direct employees about the desired goal of the organization. A recent article from the journal Vision entitled “Strategic Value Contribution Role of HR,” from authors Humaira Naznin and Md. Ashfaq Hussain,  delves into the evolution of HR.

 The abstract for the article:

This article aims to challenge the perceived lack of a strategic value of human resource (HR) function and seeks to focus on the devolution of HR from its transactional role to strategic effectiveness. Utilizing a range of secondary resources, this article aims to critically analyze the shift of HR from transactional to a strategic role and its value contribution role in business. HR needs to overcome conventional resistance and act as the driver of an organizational strategy through aligning the HR strategy to the business strategy, adopting workforce planning and measuring an organization’s competencies. The paper contributes to the evaluation of HR management from viewpoint perspective and offers help to HR practitioners in understanding the changing role of HR.

Click here to read Strategic Value Contribution Role of HR from the journal Vision free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Make sure to sign up for e-alerts and be notified of all  of the latest research published the journal Vision!

*Image attributed to woodleywonderworks (CC)

Does Employer Branding Influence a Candidate’s Job Application Decisions?

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Employer branding is mainly concerned with creating and improving the image of an organization as an employer or as a great place to work. The employer brand influences how current and potential employees interact with a company’s brand, and more specifically, the company’s brand image as an employer.

Both firm-level and job-related variables significantly influence a candidate’s job application decisions, such as intention to apply and consideration of the best companies to work for. Firms hoping to attract top candidates should carefully examine the factors that motivate top candidates to apply for positions with a company, and make an effort to improve on those variables.

Interlinked with the concept of employer branding for prospective employees is employment branding, employer knowledge, employment image and employer attractiveness. All of these factors can impact a candidate’s job choices, but improving upon these factors alone may not be adequate to attract top candidates.

Top candidates are also attracted to positions by MLS Covercompetitive salary and a firm’s media presence. Within the means of the company, HR professionals can decide how these two features can be leveraged to increase an organization’s image as an employer. HR professionals should also consider whether adjustments need to be made to recruitment strategies in response to shifts in demographic patterns, shortages of skilled workers in knowledge-based organizations, and rising costs of recruitment, selection, and training due to attrition.

Overall, employer branding is likely to generate several benefits, such as, low employee attrition, high job satisfaction, employee engagement and customer loyalty. Moreover, firms with better employer brand can afford to pay lower wage rates than the industry average. As a result, employer branding proves to be as a useful strategy for companies to maintain a positive reputation and appeal to top talent.

One example of how positive employer branding benefits companies would be a Best Employer Surveys (BES) list like the Great Place to Work Survey, which positively influences candidates’ job-related decisions. Hence, firms should attempt to increase and retain their positions in the BES ranks which will ultimately improve the organization’s image as a brand.

The abstract:

Communication of employer brand to external stakeholders has, in the recent past, seen new developments in the form of best employer surveys (BESs) and a potent form of employer branding lies in the BESs. In this article, we examine the impact of firm-related and job-related attributes on a candidate’s job application decisions by selecting firms from the BES lists. The study is based on the secondary and primary data of 139 companies which have appeared in four major BES lists from 2001 to 2012 (the longest time period for which data is available in an emerging economy—India) and primary data collected from 2,854 respondents.

Click here to read Employer Brand and Job Application Decisions: Insights from the Best Employers for free from the Management and Labour Studies.

Make sure to sign up for e-alerts and be notified of all the latest research from Management and Labour Studies.

*Featured Career Fair image is credited to University of Michigan School of Natural Resources & Environment (CC).

Free SAGE Management Books Giveaway through Monday, December 5th

Just before the holidays, we’d like to brighten your day by offering you the chance to win one of five top SAGE management books.  Whether you’re a researcher, teacher or practitioner— in HR, management, marketing research, leadership, strategy — or a host of other areas, you’ll find these books offer invaluable content from top-notch scholars and practitioners.

Entering the contest is easy. Visit Twitter @SAGEManagement and retweet the relevant tweets for the following books to enter for a chance to win.

Making Strategy: Mapping Out Strategic Success, 2/e by Fran Ackermann and Colin Eden, both at University of Strathclyde, UK • Read a sample chapter

The Coaching Manager: Developing Top Talent in Business, 2/e by James M. Hunt and Joseph R. Weintraub, both at Babson College • Read a sample chapter

Leading Edge Marketing Research: 21st Century Tools and Practices by Robert J. Kaden, The Kaden Company; Gerald Linda, Gerald Linda & Associates; and Melvin Prince, Southern Connecticut State University • Read a sample chapter

The Humanitarian Leader in Each of Us: 7 Choices That Shape a Socially Responsible Life by Frank LaFasto, Sr. VP Cardinal Health, Retired and Carl Larson, University of Denver • Read a sample chapter Extra: Click here to watch Frank LaFasto, Susie Scott Krabacher and other contributors to the book in conversation at the World of Children awards, hosted by UNICEF, November 1st, 2011 in New York.

The Essential MBA by Susan Miller, University of Durham, UK • Read a sample chapter

Remember to visit Twitter @SAGEManagement to enter for a chance to win one of these excellent resources. And become a follower  of @SAGEManagement for the latest news on SAGE products, as well as general management news items of interest.

Good luck – and thank you for following Management INK.

 

Free SAGE Management Books Giveaway through Monday, December 5th

Just before the holidays, we’d like to brighten your day by offering you the chance to win one of five top SAGE management books.  Whether you’re a researcher, teacher or practitioner— in HR, management, marketing research, leadership, strategy — or a host of other areas, you’ll find these books offer invaluable content from top-notch scholars and practitioners.

Entering the contest is easy. Visit Twitter @SAGEManagement and retweet the relevant tweets from Friday, Dec. 2nd for any of the following books to enter for a chance to win.

Making Strategy: Mapping Out Strategic Success, 2/e by Fran Ackermann and Colin Eden, both at University of Strathclyde, UK • Read a sample chapter

The Coaching Manager: Developing Top Talent in Business, 2/e by James M. Hunt and Joseph R. Weintraub, both at Babson College • Read a sample chapter

Leading Edge Marketing Research: 21st Century Tools and Practices by Robert J. Kaden, The Kaden Company; Gerald Linda, Gerald Linda & Associates; and Melvin Prince, Southern Connecticut State University • Read a sample chapter

The Humanitarian Leader in Each of Us: 7 Choices That Shape a Socially Responsible Life by Frank LaFasto, Sr. VP Cardinal Health, Retired and Carl Larson, University of Denver • Read a sample chapter Extra: Click here to watch Frank LaFasto, Susie Scott Krabacher and other contributors to the book in conversation at the World of Children awards, hosted by UNICEF, November 1st, 2011 in New York.

The Essential MBA by Susan Miller, University of Durham, UK • Read a sample chapter

Remember to visit Twitter @SAGEManagement to enter for a chance to win one of these excellent resources. And become a follower  of @SAGEManagement for the latest news on SAGE products, as well as general management news items of interest.

Good luck – and thank you for following Management INK.