Best Papers in Small Group Research

SGR_72ppiRGB_150pixwSmall Group Research addresses and connects three vital areas of study: the psychology of small groups, communication within small groups,and organizational behavior of small groups.

The winner of the 2011-2012 SGR Best Article of the Year Award was presented at the 2012 Annual Conference of the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research to:

Siyuan Huang and Jonathon N. Cummings
When Critical Knowledge Is Most Critical: Centralization in Knowledge-Intensive Teams
Small Group Research, 2011

The 2011-2012 finalist was:

Andrew W. Ishak and Dawna I. Ballard
Time to Re-Group: A Typology and Nested Phase Model for Action Teams
Small Group Research, 2012

Visit Small Group Research for more articles on topics such as team performance, innovation, group citizenship behavior, and more–and sign up for e-alerts so you don’t miss out on the latest research in your field.

The Top Five: Small Group Research

Managers and scholars interested in teamwork and team building, work groups, meeting success, and related topics will benefit from valuable findings in the five articles most read in the past month on Small Group Research. These articles—some new, some classic—are freely available to access using the links below through the end of March. Please share and enjoy!

Anthony T. Pescosolido and Richard Saavedra
Cohesion and Sports Teams: A Review
December 2012

SGR_72ppiRGB_150pixwEduardo Salas, Dana E. Sims, and C. Shawn Burke
Is there a “Big Five” in Teamwork?
October 2005

Simone Kauffeld and Nale Lehmann-Willenbrock
Meetings Matter: Effects of Team Meetings on Team and Organizational Success
April 2012

Tanja Hentschel, Meir Shemla, Jürgen Wegge, and Eric Kearney
Perceived Diversity and Team Functioning: The Role of Diversity Beliefs and Affect
February 2013

Cameron Klein, Deborah Diaz Granados, Eduardo Salas, Huy Le, C. Shawn Burke, Rebecca Lyons, and Gerald F. Goodwin
Does Team Building Work?
April 2009

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The Diversity Challenge: Part 4 of 5

Editor’s note: Today we’re continuing our series on diversity, targeting specific questions to invite discussion and exploration of related topics. If you have a question that you’d like to see addressed, add it in the comments below!

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Part 4: What can organizations gain from the interactions of individuals in diverse groups?

Gelaye Debebe, Professor of Organizational Sciences at George Washington University and Journal of Management Education (JME) contributor, has published a new book, “Navigating Power Cross-Cultural Competence in Navajo Land” (Lexington Books, 2012), which provides insights into diverse groups in organizational settings.

From the publisher’s description:

Interactions among individuals representing culturally dissimilar and politically unequal groups are a ubiquitous feature of modern life. Navigating Power: Cross-Cultural Competence in Navajo Land by Gelaye Debebe is concerned with how these interactions affect task coordination in organizational settings. While much research has addressed the effect of cultural differences on these interactions, very little work has been done examining the role of political inequality. (lexingtonbooks.com)

To read long excerpts from “Navigating Power Cross-Cultural Competence in Navajo Land” in Google Books, click here.

Hear the SAGE podcast with Professor Debebe on her JME article, “Creating a Safe Environment for Women’s Leadership Transformation,” on Management INK by clicking here.

Gelaye Debebe is Assistant Professor of Organizational Sciences at George Washington University and Faculty Affiliate at the Center for Gender in Organizations at Simmons Graduate School of Management. She received her PhD in Organizational Behavior from the University of Michigan. Her research has examined how people learn in difficult or stressful environments or situations. She has specifically explored the conditions necessary to foster transformative learning among women in formal training and how individuals who represent culturally dissimilar and politically unequal groups create new knowledge through their interactions. Her published work has appeared in Research in Organizational Behavior, Journal of Management Education, Advancing Women in Leadership Journal, International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Human Resourced Development International, Issues in Intercultural Communication and Development in Practice.

Up next–the conclusion to our series: How can we improve organizational management and teaching strategies to increase diversity and inclusion?

Happily Ever After

Charles A. Funk, Northeastern Illinois University, and Brian W. Kulik, Hawaii Pacific University, published “Happily Ever After: Toward a Theory of Late Stage Group Performance” on November 11th, 2011 in Group & Organization Management’s OnlineFirst collection.To view other OnlineFirst articles, please click here.

The abstract:

This article develops a theory of late stage group performance based on the late stage group’s unique characteristics: a long shared history, an indefinite endpoint, a long member entry/exit history, and a long “parent” organization relationship. These characteristics are markedly different from those of earlier stage groups, suggesting that extant literature’s limited “maintenance” or “cyclical” prescriptions are insufficient for effective late stage group management. Six propositions are developed to model the relationship between late stage group characteristics and performance. Managerial implications are also discussed and a late stage group research agenda is proposed.

To learn more about Group & Organization Management, please follow this link.

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2011 Journal of Management Scholarly Award Winners!

Management INK would like to congratulate the following 2011 Scholarly Impact Award winners for the Journal of Management:

Robert E. Ployhart, University of South Carolina, published “Staffing in the 21st Century: New Challenges and Strategic Opportunities” in the December 2006 issue.

The abstract:

Modern organizations struggle with staffing challenges stemming from increased knowledge work, labor shortages, competition for applicants, and workforce diversity. Yet, despite such critical needs for effective staffing practice, staffing research continues to be neglected or misunderstood by many organizational decision makers. Solving these challenges requires staffing scholars to expand their focus from individual-level recruitment and selection research to multilevel research demonstrating the business unit/organizational− level impact of staffing. Toward this end, this review provides a selective and critical analysis of staffing best practices covering literature from roughly 2000 to the present. Several research-practice gaps are also identified. 

 Linda K. Treviño, Pennsylvania State University, Gary R. Weaver, University of Delaware, and Scott J. Reynolds, University of Washington, published “Behavioral Ethics in Organizations: A Review” in the December 2006 issue.

The abstract:

The importance of ethical behavior to an organization has never been more apparent, and in recent years researchers have generated a great deal of knowledge about the management of individual ethical behavior in organizations. We review this literature and attempt to provide a coherent portrait of the current state of the field. We discuss individual, group, and organizational influences and consider gaps in current knowledge and obstacles that limit our understanding. We conclude by offering directions for future research on behavioral ethics in organizations.

Michael H. Lubatkin, Zeki Simsek, both of  University of Connecticut, Yan Ling, George Mason University, and John F. Veiga, University of Connecticut, published “Ambidexterity and Performance in Small-to Medium-Sized Firms: The Pivotal Role of Top Management Team Behavioral Integration” in the October 2006 issue.

The abstract:

While a firm’s ability to jointly pursue both an exploitative and exploratory orientation has been posited as having positive performance effects, little is currently known about the antecedents and consequences of such ambidexterity in small- to medium-sized firms (SMEs). To that end, this study focuses on the pivotal role of top management team (TMT) behavioral integration in facilitating the processing of disparate demands essential to attaining ambidexterity in SMEs. Then, to address the bottom-line importance of an ambidextrous orientation, the study hypothesizes its association with relative firm performance. Multisource survey data, including CEOs and TMT members from 139 SMEs, provide support for both hypotheses.

 Greg L. Stewart, University of Iowa, published “A Meta-Analytic Review of Relationships Between Team Design Features and Team Performance” in the February 2006 issue.

The abstract:

This article presents a quantitative review of 93 studies examining relationships between team design features and team performance. Aggregated measures of individual ability and disposition correlate positively with team performance. Team member heterogeneity and performance correlate near zero, but the effect varies somewhat by type of team. Project and management teams have slightly higher performance when they include more members. Team-level task meaningfulness exhibits a modest but inconsistent relationship with performance. Increased autonomy and intrateam coordination correspond with higher performance, but the effect varies depending on task type. Leadership, particularly transformational and empowering leadership, improves team performance.

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