Call for Papers: World Future Review!

Current Issue CoverWorld Future Review is currently accepting submissions concerned with futures research. The journal publishes foresight literature addressing topics informed by technology assessment, policy analysis, operations research, issues management, competition research, and more. To find out more about the manuscript submission guidelines and how you can submit your manuscript to World Future Review, click here.

In the recent June 2016 issue, World Future Review featured articles that addressed social movements and futures research, the operational process for organizational foresight, and the health of futures studies. In addition, a new article published online by authors David N. Bengston, Jim Dator, Michael J. Dockry, and Aubrey Yee entitled “Alternative Futures for Forest-Based Nanomaterials: An Application of the Manoa School’s Alternative Futures Method” delves into four alternative futures for forestry. The abstract for the article:

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Forestry and forest products research has entered into a robust research agenda focused on creating nano-sized particles and nanoproducts from wood. As wood-based materials can be sustainably produced, the potential of these renewable products could be limitless and include high-end compostable electronics, paint-on solar panels, and lightweight materials for airplanes and cars. Others warn about potential serious negative health and environmental consequences. Either way, wood-based nanomaterials could disrupt forestry as we know it. This article is a summary and analysis of a collaborative research project exploring the futures of wood-based nanomaterials within the context of the futures of forests and forest management within the United States. We start by describing the history of forestry through the lens of the U.S. Forest Service, then describe nanotechnology in general and wood-based nanocellulose specifically. Next, we outline the Manoa School alternative futures method, and how we used it to design and carry out a “complete futures of x” project. Following the Manoa School approach, we describe four alternative futures for forestry and forest management. We conclude with implications for the future of forestry, forests, and forest-based nanomaterials, as well as a discussion on the implementation of a complete “futures of x” project.

You can read both the June 2016 issue and the article “Alternative Futures for Forest-Based Nanomaterials: An Application of the Manoa School’s Alternative Futures Method” from World Future Review free for the next two weeks. Want to stay up to date on all of the latest research from World Future ReviewClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Wood image attributed to Dennis Hill (CC)

Introducing the New Editor of World Future Review!

We’re pleased to welcome the new editor of World Future Review, James Allen Dator! Jim Dator graciously provided us with some information on his background:

James Allen Dator is Professor Emeritus and former Director of the Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies, Department of Political Science, and Adjunct Professor in the College of Architecture, of the University of Hawaii at Manoa; Co-Chair and Core Lecturer, Space Humanities, International Space University, Strasbourg, France; Adjunct Professor, Graduate School of Futures Strategy, Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Daejeon, Korea, and former President, World Futures Studies Federation. He recently became editor in chief of the World Future Review. He also taught at Rikkyo University (Tokyo, for six years), the University of Maryland, Virginia Tech, the University of Toronto, and the InterUniversity Consortium for Postgraduate Studies in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia.

He received a BA in Ancient and Medieval History and Philosophy from Stetson University, an MA in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania, and a PhD in Political Science from The American University. He did post-graduate work at Virginia Theological Seminary (Ethics and Church History), Yale University (Japanese Language), The University of Michigan (Linguistics and Quantitative Methods), Southern Methodist University (Mathematical Applications in Political Science).

He is a Danforth Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Fellow, and Fulbright Fellow.

World Future Review is the source for information about future studies as WFR_72ppiRGB_powerpointan academic discipline and consulting discipline. Jim Dator shares the following:

What will distinguish WFR from other futures journals is that (as a rule) it will not have articles about “the future” or “the futures of x”, but rather about futures studies as an academic and consulting discipline—the roots of futures studies, its present state, the preferred futures for futures studies itself.

I am especially interested in anything that states what you see are, or should be, the intellectual roots of futures studies, not only in terms of other futurists, but more generally: what scholars, schools of though, ideologies, social theories, methods, underlay what the early futurists thought and wrote? What now? What should underlie them?

What assumptions do we make about “time”? “Where” is the future? What is the role of human agency vs. other forces (such as technology, for example) in shaping the futures. Your thoughts on the role of language in shaping our ideas about futures (as Bae Ilhan has done about East Asian languages vs. English/French futures studies, for example). I imagine there are aspects of Hungarian that lead to certain ideas about the futures that are different from English, French, or Spanish. Or maybe not!

Interested in submitting a manuscript to the World Future Review? Find out more about submission guidelines here!

 

Top Five: The Future

wf2013logo324by148The World Future Society’s annual conference, WorldFuture 2013: Exploring the Next Horizon, is taking place right now in Chicago. WorldFuture 2013 brings together the world’s premier minds to discuss the long-range future of science, technology, humanity, government, religion and many other topics. Speakers at this “World’s Fair of Ideas” include MIT Media Lab founder Nicholas Negroponte, visionary author Ramez Naam, Ford futurist Sheryl Connelly, and geosecurity expert John Watts.  Keep up with the latest news from the conference on Twitter using hashtag #WF13.

WFR_72ppiRGB_150pixWTo celebrate WorldFuture 2013, we’re pleased to bring you the current top five most-read articles from World Future Review. With topics ranging from the future of jobs to a book review on agricultural biotechnology, these are sure to pique your interest. They are free to access using the links below through August 3. Please share and enjoy!

James M. Higgins
The Fourth Singularity and the Future of Jobs
World Future Review March 2013

Michael Marien
Book Review: Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think, by Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler
World Future Review March 2013

Rick Docksai
Book Review: The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet, by Ramez Naam
World Future Review March 2013

Peter F. Eder
Book Review: Seeds, Science, and Struggle: The Global Politics of Transgenic Crops, by Abby Kinchy
World Future Review March 2013 5: 73-75, doi:10.1177/1946756713478581

Victor Grech, Clare Vassallo, and Ivan Callus
The Last (Fertile) Man on Earth: Comedy or Fantasy?
World Future Review March 2013

Do you have a paper to submit? The editors of World Future Review invite manuscripts from contributors worldwide whose essays fall within the broad spectrum defined as “futures research.” Click here for more information.