Using Simulation as a Training Tool for Project Management

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Educators work hard to make sure their pupils are prepared for their chosen field of work. Inside a classroom, however, this can prove challenging. Many teachers have begun turning to simulations that will help provide their students with the opportunity to put their knowledge to the test. In their article in Simulation and Gaming, “Evaluating a Project Management Simulation Training Exercise,”  Ki-Young Jeong and Ipek Bozkurt discuss their findings on using simulation as a training tool for  teaching students project management.

The abstract:

This research is an evaluation of a single-player, project management simulation training exercise. Our objective is to gain understanding about the extent to which it contributes to participants’ project management knowledge and skills. Results from pre- and post-simulation exercise questionnaires indicate that overall the simulation exercise S&G_2013_C1.inddsignificantly improves a participant’s conceptual knowledge about project management. It also indicates that participants with less experience achieve more knowledge improvement than those with more experience. Results further indicate that the actual performance of the exercise, which represents the educational value of the exercise, is primarily dependent on the post-project management knowledge of the participant established throughout the exercise, prior knowledge brought to the exercise, and the experience of the participant. We believe that these results indicate that the simulation training exercise is a valuable training tool, which both engineering and project managers can use.

Read “Evaluating a Project Management Simulation Training Exercise” in Simulation and Gaming for free by clicking here. Want to be notified of any new articles from Simulation and Gaming? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Encouraging Exercise in the Elderly

Stephan Dahl of Hull University, Lynne Eagle of James Cook University, and Mustafa Ebrahimjee of the Leigh Primary Care Centre are looking at new ways to reach out to the over-65 population when it comes to physical activity. We had a chance to speak with Dr. Dahl about the paper, “Golden Moves: Developing a Transtheoretical Model-based Social Marketing Intervention in an Elderly Population.”  Read some of his thoughts below and the full article in Social Marketing Quarterly here.

There are many social marketing activities trying to increase physical activity as a major contributor to overall health and well-being. Surprisingly, only a few of these have targeted specifically people over the age of 65. However, elderly people can benefit enormously from increased physical activity in general, or even by engaging in a structured exercise programme. Yet, elderly are also a specific target group, with quite different assumptions about and different needs in relation to exercise than younger target audiences. The study “Golden Moves: Developing a Transtheoretical Model-based Social Marketing Intervention in an Elderly Population” therefore examined how this particular group can be reached by social marketing – and how and by whom potentially successful messages regarding the benefits of more physical activity can be communicated to be successful. Using a grounded theory approach, and relying on two samples from two different parts of the UK, the paper shows a modeled inteSMq Coverrvention, based on the transtheoretical model of behaviour change, and how this can be put into practice.

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Helping Students Manage Their Energy

Getting acclimated to back-to-school season? The Journal of Management Education has good advice to help students get recharged and channel their energy toward a healthy personal and professional life. Gretchen M. Spreitzer of the University of Michigan and Traci Grant, University of Michigan alumna, published “Helping Students Manage Their Energy: Taking Their Pulse With the Energy Audit” in the April 2012 issue of JME. The abstract:

This article introduces a tool to help students learn to better manage their energy. The tool asks students to assess their energy levels for each waking hour over at least 2 days in order to identify patterns of activities associated with high energy and with depleted energy. The article describes how to use the tool in the classroom by articulating the learning objectives, providing background research on energy regulation, and debriefing student reactions. The findings from two classes of students suggest that the tool is effective in achieving its learning goals and has a longer term impact on student behavior. The article closes by discussing the challenges of energy management for students.

Click here to read on and here to learn more about the Journal of Management Education.

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Helping Students Manage Their Energy

Gretchen M. Spreitzer, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Traci Grant, University of Michigan alumna, published “Helping Students Manage Their Energy: Taking Their Pulse With the Energy Audit” on December 5th, 2011 in the Journal of Management Education. To view other OnlineFirst articles, please click here.

The abstract:

This article introduces a tool to help students learn to better manage their energy. The tool asks students to assess their energy levels for each waking hour over at least 2 days in order to identify patterns of activities associated with high energy and with depleted energy. The article describes how to use the tool in the classroom by articulating the learning objectives, providing background research on energy regulation, and debriefing student reactions. The findings from two classes of students suggest that the tool is effective in achieving its learning goals and has a longer term impact on student behavior. The article closes by discussing the challenges of energy management for students.

To learn more about the Journal of Management Education, please follow this link.

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