Business Ethics Everywhere

Business ethics issues are cropping up every day in the news, but not always taking hold in the mind of the management student. How can instructors give future business leaders the tools they need to behave ethically?

Susan D. Baker of Morgan State University and Debra R. Comer of Hofstra University, who published “Business Ethics Everywhere’: An Experiential Exercise to Develop Students’ Ability to Identify and Respond to Ethical Issues in Business” in the Journal of Management Education (JME) February 2012 issue, created an easy-to-implement classroom exercise to teach about ethics through real-world examples. Janet Gillespie, an associate editor of JME, talked recently with the authors about why this exercise hit home with students. Click here to listen to the podcast and here to subscribe on iTunes.

Susan D. Baker, Associate Professor of Management in the Earl G. Graves School of Business and Management at Morgan State University, received her Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior and Development from George Washington University. She teaches classes in business ethics, leadership, and organizational behavior. Her current research interests include ethical behavior in organizations, followership, and role-sharing and role exchange between followers and leaders.

Debra R. Comer is a Professor of Management in the Zarb School of Business at Hofstra University. She received her B.A. with honors in psychology from Swarthmore College and her M.A., M. Phil., and Ph.D. in organizational behavior from Yale University. Her current research interests include ethical behavior in organizations, on-line learning, crisis management education, and the use of popular culture in management education.

Follow this link to hear more interviews in the Journal of Management Education podcast series. Further information about the journal can be found here.

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Ethics and the Corporation

After a week in which outgoing executive Greg Smith accused Goldman Sachs of losing its “moral fiber,” Apple’s factory conditions in China made news again, and the Ethisphere Institute released its 2012 list of the World’s Most Ethical Companies, the issue of corporate ethics is in the spotlight.

For today’s post, we’ve pulled together a diverse assortment of articles related to ethics and the corporation, including an analysis of global codes of ethics, an exercise in ethics education, and a study of executives’ ethical leadership.

We hope you find this selection insightful and thought-provoking.

Gene R. Laczniak, Marquette University, and Ann-Marie Kennedy, Auckland University of Technology

Hyper Norms: Searching for a Global Code of Conduct

Journal of Macromarketing (September 2011)

 

Susan D. Baker, Morgan State University, and Debra R. Comer, Hofstra University

‘Business Ethics Everywhere’: An Experiential Exercise to Develop Students’ Ability to Identify and Respond to Ethical Issues in Business

Journal of Management Education (February 2012)

 

Jennifer Jordan, University of Groningen; Michael E. Brown, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College; Linda K. Treviño, The Pennsylvania State University; and Sydney Finkelstein, Dartmouth College

Someone to Look Up To: Executive–Follower Ethical Reasoning and Perceptions of Ethical Leadership

Journal of Management (March 15, 2011)

 

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The September 2011 issue of Business & Society is Online

The September 2011 issue of Business & Society (BAS) is now available online here. This issue continues the 50th anniversary celebration volume, which includes a special section of three dissertation abstracts that were the finalists for the best dissertation award of the Social Issues in Management (SIM) Division of the Academy of Management in August 2010. Professor James Mattingly, an associate editor for BAS, and the finalists prepared articles for this section.

The lead article for this issue was published by Roberto Garcia-Castro, Miguel A. Ariño, both of IESE Business School, and Miguel A. Canela, University of Barcelona, entitled “Over the Long Run? Short-Run Impact and Long-Run Consequences of Stakeholder Management.”

The Abstract:

The stakeholder view of the firm has been justified under instrumental and normative bases. Whereas the instrumental basis argues that “enlightened stakeholder management” is a necessary precondition to seek shareholders’ value maximization, the normative basis relies on the observance of ethical norms by managers and the notion that the stakeholders should be treated as “ends.” Some scholars argue that both views actually converge. However, this article provides empirical evidence of the negative effects of stakeholder management in shareholders’ value in the short run and the positive effects over the long run, using a longitudinal database of 658 U.S. firms. Given the difficulties of anticipating the instrumental long-term financial effects of short-run decisions affecting the different stakeholders, the authors’ findings support the view of the normative basis for stakeholder theory based on ethics, norms, and heuristic criteria as a way to solve conflicts among the claims of different stakeholders.

The other articles in this issue can be found here. For more information about Business & Society, please follow this link.

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New Business & Society Issue is Available

Business & Society‘s September 2011 issue is now available online! To view the Table of Contents, please click here.

Roberto Garcia-Castro, Miguel A. Ariño, both of IESE Business School, and Miguel A. Canela, University of Barcelona, published “Over the Long-Run? Short-Run Impact and Long-Run Consequences of Stakeholder Management” in this new issue of Business & Society.

The abstract:

The stakeholder view of the firm has been justified under instrumental and normative bases. Whereas the instrumental basis argues that “enlightened stakeholder management” is a necessary precondition to seek shareholders’ value maximization, the normative basis relies on the observance of ethical norms by managers and the notion that the stakeholders should be treated as “ends.” Some scholars argue that both views actually converge. However, this article provides empirical evidence of the negative effects of stakeholder management in shareholders’ value in the short run and the positive effects over the long run, using a longitudinal database of 658 U.S. firms. Given the difficulties of anticipating the instrumental long-term financial effects of short-run decisions affecting the different stakeholders, the authors’ findings support the view of the normative basis for stakeholder theory based on ethics, norms, and heuristic criteria as a way to solve conflicts among the claims of different stakeholders.

To view other articles in this issue, please follow this link.

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2011 Journal of Management Scholarly Award Winners!

Management INK would like to congratulate the following 2011 Scholarly Impact Award winners for the Journal of Management:

Robert E. Ployhart, University of South Carolina, published “Staffing in the 21st Century: New Challenges and Strategic Opportunities” in the December 2006 issue.

The abstract:

Modern organizations struggle with staffing challenges stemming from increased knowledge work, labor shortages, competition for applicants, and workforce diversity. Yet, despite such critical needs for effective staffing practice, staffing research continues to be neglected or misunderstood by many organizational decision makers. Solving these challenges requires staffing scholars to expand their focus from individual-level recruitment and selection research to multilevel research demonstrating the business unit/organizational− level impact of staffing. Toward this end, this review provides a selective and critical analysis of staffing best practices covering literature from roughly 2000 to the present. Several research-practice gaps are also identified. 

 Linda K. Treviño, Pennsylvania State University, Gary R. Weaver, University of Delaware, and Scott J. Reynolds, University of Washington, published “Behavioral Ethics in Organizations: A Review” in the December 2006 issue.

The abstract:

The importance of ethical behavior to an organization has never been more apparent, and in recent years researchers have generated a great deal of knowledge about the management of individual ethical behavior in organizations. We review this literature and attempt to provide a coherent portrait of the current state of the field. We discuss individual, group, and organizational influences and consider gaps in current knowledge and obstacles that limit our understanding. We conclude by offering directions for future research on behavioral ethics in organizations.

Michael H. Lubatkin, Zeki Simsek, both of  University of Connecticut, Yan Ling, George Mason University, and John F. Veiga, University of Connecticut, published “Ambidexterity and Performance in Small-to Medium-Sized Firms: The Pivotal Role of Top Management Team Behavioral Integration” in the October 2006 issue.

The abstract:

While a firm’s ability to jointly pursue both an exploitative and exploratory orientation has been posited as having positive performance effects, little is currently known about the antecedents and consequences of such ambidexterity in small- to medium-sized firms (SMEs). To that end, this study focuses on the pivotal role of top management team (TMT) behavioral integration in facilitating the processing of disparate demands essential to attaining ambidexterity in SMEs. Then, to address the bottom-line importance of an ambidextrous orientation, the study hypothesizes its association with relative firm performance. Multisource survey data, including CEOs and TMT members from 139 SMEs, provide support for both hypotheses.

 Greg L. Stewart, University of Iowa, published “A Meta-Analytic Review of Relationships Between Team Design Features and Team Performance” in the February 2006 issue.

The abstract:

This article presents a quantitative review of 93 studies examining relationships between team design features and team performance. Aggregated measures of individual ability and disposition correlate positively with team performance. Team member heterogeneity and performance correlate near zero, but the effect varies somewhat by type of team. Project and management teams have slightly higher performance when they include more members. Team-level task meaningfulness exhibits a modest but inconsistent relationship with performance. Increased autonomy and intrateam coordination correspond with higher performance, but the effect varies depending on task type. Leadership, particularly transformational and empowering leadership, improves team performance.

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