Student Assessment of Venture Creation Courses in Entrepreneurship Higher Education

[We’re pleased to welcome author Helena Wenninger of Lancaster University Management School. Dr. Wenninger recently published an article in Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy entitled “Student Assessment of Venture Creation Courses in Entrepreneurship Higher Education—An Interdisciplinary Literature Review and Practical Case Analysis,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Dr. Wenninger discusses the motivations and impact of this research.]

What motivated you to pursue this research?

Living in the 21st century brings huge opportunities but also responsibilities for today’s graduates. Requirements from employers, quickly changing economic conditions, global competition, and environmental concerns highlight the need for people having a vision, being resilient, and have no fear of making decisions under uncertain conditions. Thus, entrepreneurial skills are more relevant than ever not only for creating a venture but also to contribute to a meaningful business environment and to society as a whole. However, students’ performance is mainly measured and benchmarked by their grade point average, which comprehensively gives assessment high priority in students’ considerations. Based on those observations, the idea was born to investigate how I as an assistant professor teaching e-business venture creation in one of my courses can contribute to a better match of these two aspects and spread the insights.

In what ways is your research innovative, and how do you think it will impact the field?

This research offers insights into student assessment for experiential entrepreneurship education. Entrepreneurship programmes are mushrooming around the world, but research is lacking behind regarding the impact that assessment has on student learning in this area. I hope my work will further direct attention on the importance of assessment methods for students’ experience and learning for action-oriented, experiential, and learning-by-doing approaches.

What advice would you give to new scholars and incoming researchers in this particular field of study?

Drawing from my personal experience as a lecturer in Information Systems, investigating the work from experienced scholars in the Entrepreneurship field, and discussing the topic with colleagues from the Educational Research department of my university was an encouraging and stimulating process for me to develop this work. Thus, I would recommend considering various sources of inspiration across relevant disciplines.

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