Top Management Team Diversity, Equality and Innovation in the Health Care Industry

[We’re pleased to welcome A. Erin Bass of the University of Nebraska Omaha. She recently published an article in the Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies entitled “Top Management Team Diversity, Equality, and Innovation: A Multilevel Investigation of the Health Care Industry,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, she writes about her research.]

What motivated you to pursue this research?

I was motivated to pursue this research because I have always been interested in inequality issues, and equality is important in every aspect of organizations–from hiring to promotions to compensation. In this article, I examine equality issues in healthcare–an industry in which this issue is becoming more and more of a headline. When I speak to my female colleagues in healthcare, they all agree that equality issues are something they deal with on a daily basis. I wanted to see if equality matters for a key organizational outcome–innovation. The article indicates important relationships between female representation and compensation and innovation. I hope this angle can be used to encourage more equality in healthcare.

Were there any specific external events—political, social, or economic—that influenced your decision to pursue this research?

I was unaware of what a great presence female medical professionals have on social media and beyond! For example, my colleague, Dr. Sasha Shillcutt, is not only an anesthesiologist at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, she is also an entrepreneur, creating a huge online community, https://www.becomebraveenough.com/, to support equality issues for females in healthcare. In speaking to her and others, I realized this is a huge issue and one that I wanted to contribute to. By linking equality to an important organizational outcome, innovation, I demonstrate how equality is not just a feel-good motive–it has important organizational implications as well!

In what ways is your research innovative, and how do you think it will impact the field?

I hope this research will make healthcare organizations realize the value of equality in top management teams, and how having females represented and equally compensated will actually drive innovation for the organization. In an era with rapid innovation and hyper-competition, what organization wouldn’t want to promote equality to help drive new technologies and solutions?!?

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Work Group Inclusion

[We’re pleased to welcome authors Beth G. Chung of San Diego State University, Karen H. Ehrhart of the University of Central Florida, Lynn M. Shore of Colorado State University, Amy E. Randel of San Diego State University, Michelle A. Dean of San Diego State University, and Uma Kedharnath of the University of Wisconsin–Whitewater. They recently published an article in Group and Organization Management entitled “Work Group Inclusion: Test of a Scale and Model” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, they recount the motivations and challenges of this research:]

We decided to pursue this research because of the momentum the concept of inclusion has gained in both the academic and business world. Part of this momentum was generated by a conceptual paper (Shore et al., 2011) we wrote that clearly defined the concept of inclusion in the literature. According to our conceptual paper, inclusion is feeling like you belong and are accepted for your uniqueness in a group. The conceptual paper also forwarded a theoretical model to be tested. The current paper does just that. We test a measure of inclusion that contains both uniqueness and belongingness and we test a complete model of the predictors and outcomes of work group inclusion.

One of the most challenging aspects of doing work on inclusion and diversity is that companies are sometimes weary of providing data regarding these topics. Although the information provided by our research can only help organizations improve, the tendency is to shy away from research that might reveal unbecoming information. However, with persistence and tenacity, we were able to collect the data and validate a measure that is greatly needed to practically assess inclusion in organizations. It is a short measure (10-items) that can help an organization assess whether their employees feel inclusion within their workgroups. We are able to show that these feelings of inclusion have important consequences such as improved performance, creativity, and increased helping behavior. We believe that this article will be useful to both academics and practitioners alike.

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SGR Best Paper Award

We are pleased to congratulate Dr. Wei Zheng from the University of Wisconsin and Dr. Jun Wei from the University of Science and Technology Beijing, China for winning the Small Group Research 2017-2018 Best Paper Award.  The abstract of the article, “Linking Ethnic Composition and Performance: Information Integration Between Majority and Minority Members,” is below and the article will be free to read for a limited time.

sgrd_49_4_coverOften labeled a double-edged sword, diversity can not only trigger social categorization that dampens group cohesion and performance, but it can also increase available information resources and enhance group performance. The ways in which a group integrates information from diverse members play a central role in determining whether and how it can reap benefits from diversity. Guided by research in team diversity and relational demography, we take a diversity-as-disparity approach and focus on the extent of information integration between majority- and minority-status members in a group. Specifically, drawing from social network research, we examine whether majority–minority information brokerage equality mediates the impact of ethnic composition on group performance. Based on data from 540 employees in 34 work groups from a Chinese organization, we find that majority–minority information brokerage equality mediates the impact of ethnic composition on performance but only when group climate is high. We also discuss theoretical and practical implications.


Have research on important group and team research literature? Check out the submission guidelines for the 2021 Review Issue!

The Psychology of Diversity Resistance and Integration

[We’re pleased to welcome authors Christine Wiggins-Romesburg of the University of Louisville and Rod P. Githens of the University of the Pacific. They recently published an article in the Human Resource and Development Review entitled “The Psychology of Diversity Resistance and Integration,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Ms. Wiggins-Romesburg reflects on experiences that inspired this research:]

hrda_16_4.coverIn my prior career as a human resource management practitioner, I worked in a mid-sized corporation where executives were credibly accused of sexual harassment, and it was left to me to address the complaints. I thought that, given the mutual respect I had with the men accused and our shared interest in protecting the organization from lawsuits, I could convince them to discontinue any offensive behavior. Much to my dismay, my efforts resulted in a deepening of biased attitudes and an apparent escalation of harassment that placed the business at increased risk, and ultimately had a negative impact on the careers of the targets and on my own career. I was floored. This experience left me to wonder, “What I could have said or have done differently to produce a better result?”

Although this happened more than ten years ago, today we find countless examples in the media and other recent events where people are called out for their biases and treatment of others. While such behavior may justly earn public condemnation, treating biased individuals this way can be divisive, and provoke defensiveness and shame. As this paper shows, this can increase resistance to change and lessen the chance of a positive outcome.

One possible solution might be taking a softer approach to dealing with biased individuals that is more caring of the needs of those whose behavior we hope to change. This approach is further applicable in situations where the biased individual is in a position of power. The findings were counterintuitive for me personally, and have left me with many more questions that I will continue to investigate.

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Job Satisfaction and Work Climate: New Collections from GOM!

GOM_Feb_2016.inddGroup & Organization has added two new article collections to the Editor’s Choice Collections. The new Job Satisfaction collection offers a selection of interesting articles that explore topics like career plateauing, internal job transitions, and the effect of leader humor on job satisfaction.

The new Work Climate collection delves into workplace research, including papers on workplace boredom, personality as a predictor of climate, and the impact of bad behavior in groups. In the article “The Psychological Benefits of Creating an Affirming Climate for Workplace Diversity,” authors Donna Chrobot-Mason and Nicholas P. Aramovich try to identify how workplace diversity can lead to positive outcomes. The abstract from their paper:

Workforce diversity has been described as a double-edged sword; it has the potential for positive and negative outcomes. To better understand why and how diversity leads to positive outcomes, we examined the relationship between employee perceptions of diversity climate perceptions and intent to turnover. We explored the role of four psychological outcome variables (organizational commitment, climate for innovation, psychological empowerment, and identity freedom) as possible mediators of this relationship. Racial and gender subgroup differences were also examined. Survey data were collected from 1,731 public employees. Findings suggest that when employees perceive equal access to opportunities and fair treatment, intent to turn over decreases. Furthermore, these relationships are significantly mediated by psychological outcomes. Implications for diversity management and training are discussed.

6983317491_e8d8440af8_zIn addition, new articles have been added to Group & Organization Management‘s other collections, including the Editor’s Choice collection on Creativity & Innovation. New articles to this collection explore the impact of job complexity, team culture, and interaction on the creative process. In the article “Defining Creative Ideas: Toward a More Nuanced Approach,” authors Robert C. Litchfield, Lucy L. Gilson, and Paul W. Gilson distinguish types of creative ideas to better understand the creative process. The abstract from their paper:

Organizational creativity research has focused extensively on distinguishing creativity from routine, non-creative work. In this conceptual article, we examine the less considered issue of variation in the type of creative ideas. Starting from the premise that creativity occurs along a continuum that can range from incremental to radical, we propose that unpacking variation in the mix of novelty and two common conceptions of usefulness—feasibility and value—results in seven meaningfully different types of creativity. We group these types of creativity into four creative continua scaled according to novelty to provide an organizing framework for future research.

To celebrate Group & Organization Managements new collections and articles, we have opened all of the articles in the Job Satisfaction, Work Climate, and Creativity & Innovation collections for the next 60 days. Interested in Group & Organization‘s other Editor’s Choice collections? Click here.  Want to know all about the latest research from Group & Organization? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Family image credited to dbking (CC)

Rosalie L. Tung on the Requisites to Developing a Global Mindset

[We’re pleased to welcome Rosalie L. Tung, author of Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies‘ Distinguished Scholar Invited Essay entitled “Requisites to and Ways of Developing a Global Mind-Set: Implications for Research on Leadership and Organizations.”]

Leaders and professionals are agreed that the development of a global mindset is imperative to success in coping with the challenges and taking advantage of the opportunities associated with the growingJLOS_72ppiRGB_powerpoint interconnectedness of the world’s economies. This paper uses an evidence-based approach to identify the requisites for nurturing a global mindset and discusses the training programs that can facilitate this development.

The abstract:

To respond effectively to changes in the calculus of global competition—the rise of emerging market multinationals and the crisis of confidence in industrialized countries—leaders and organizations need to develop a global mind-set. This article identifies four requisites to the development of a global mind-set and three ways for developing this orientation. The implications for leadership and organizations are then discussed.

“Requisites to and Ways of Developing a Global Mind-Set: Implications for Research on Leadership and Organizations” can be read for free by clicking here. Click here to sign up for e-alerts and get all the latest updates from Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies sent directly to your inbox!

tungRosalie L. Tung, the Ming & Stella Wong Professor of International Business at Simon Fraser University, is the 2014-2015 President-Elect of the Academy of International Business. Previously, she served as President of the Academy of Management (2003-2004). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the Academy of Management, the Academy of International Business, and the British Academy of Management. She has published many books and articles on international human resource management, international business negotiations, and comparative management. She serves on the editorial board of many academic journals.

Diversity: PPM Editor’s Choice

ppmLooking for articles on important topics in human resources? The Public Personnel Management Editor’s Choice Collections cover organizational commitment, employee benefits, turnover, diversity, and much more. Click here to see them all, or read on for highlights from the diversity collection:

PPM_72ppiRGB_150pixWSalomon A. Guajardo of the City University of New York writes in his article, “Workforce Diversity: An Application of Diversity and Integration Indices to Small Agencies“:

Over the past 40 years, the research on workforce diversity has increased significantly. Despite this increased research, little attention has been given to the application of diversity and integration indices to departments with small workforces. Even less attention has been given to inferences that are made based on the diversity or integration scores that are obtained from the application of diversity indices. These issues are important because human resources managers and administrators are likely to modify or implement diversity policies or initiatives based on the diversity scores they obtain. This article applies three diversity indices to departments with small workforces and evaluates how data aggregation affects diversity scores and the inferences made based on those scores.

And in their paper “Diversity Management: Development, Practices, and Perceptions among State and Local Government Agencies,” Heather Wyatt-Nichol of the University of Baltimore and Kwame Badu Antwi-Boasiako of Stephen F. Austin State University write:

In addition to normative claims and theoretical arguments that support diversity management, a recent study by Pitts provides empirical evidence linking diversity management to organizational performance. Using data from the 2006 Federal Human Capital Survey he found that positive perceptions of work group performance were more prevalent among whites than minorities. An examination of gender differences also revealed that women were more likely to have positive perceptions of group performance. Of greater significance is evidence of a positive relationship between diversity management, job satisfaction, and organizational performance.

Click here to see the complete Editor’s Choice Collections, and here to learn more about Public Personnel Management.

Stay informed: receive e-alerts when new articles are published by clicking here.