Who Is a Leader?

JLOS_72ppiRGB_150pixWAs SIOP 2013 draws near, we’re highlighting industrial-organizational psychology perspectives on management topics. Today, we look at “Five Perspectives on the Leadership– Management Relationship: A Competency- Based Evaluation and Integration,” published by Daniel V. Simonet and Robert P. Tett, both of the University of Tulsa, in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies on December 12, 2012:

How management and leadership are best conceptualized with respect to each other has been a frequent topic of debate. Five distinct perspectives are identified in the literature, including bipolar, unidimensional, bidimensional, hierarchical— management within leadership, and hierarchical—leadership within management. We assessed the viability of these perspectives by having Academy of Management and Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology experts (N = 43) map a comprehensive set of 63 managerial and leadership competencies, as a “common language,” onto defined and undefined management and leadership dimensions. Results reveal interpretable patterns of uniqueness and overlap, suggesting a hybrid co-dimensional/bidimensional configuration. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in light of the precedence of “what” over “how” in developing leadership and management theory.

Click here to continue reading “Five Perspectives on the Leadership– Management Relationship: A Competency- Based Evaluation and Integration,” published by Daniel V. Simonet and Robert P. Tett in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, and stay tuned for more related research ahead of #SIOP13.

What Makes an Outstanding Leader?

In the latest podcast from the Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, leadership expert, professor, and author Richard Boyatzis of Case Western Reserve University talks with Editor Ken Thompson about his article “Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Intelligence and Personality as Predictors of Sales Leadership Performance,” co-authored by Darren Good of Pepperdine University and Raymond Massa of Vaudreuil-Dorion in Montreal. Click here to listen to the podcast and here to subscribe on iTunes. Dr. Boyatzis expands on the study’s investigation into the role of emotional and social intelligence (ESI) in effective leadership to answer the question: What are the characteristics of outstanding leaders?

Richard Boyatzis is Distinguished University Professor, professor in Departments of Organizational Behavior, Psychology, and Cognitive Science at Case Western Reserve University, Adjunct Professor at ESADE. Having authored more than 150 articles, his books include The Competent Manager, and two international best-sellers: Primal Leadership with Daniel Goleman & Annie McKee; and Resonant Leadership, with McKee.

Ken Thompson, Ph.D., is professor and the former chair of management at DePaul University, where he has been on staff since 1986. He has co-authored four books, contributed to six others, and has been published in a number of journals including the Academy of Management Executive, Organizational Dynamics, Journal of Social Psychology, Human Relations, and the Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies where he is senior editor.

What is the Role of Emotional and Social Intelligence in Effective Leadership?

Richard E. Boyatzis, Case Western Reserve University, Darren Good, Christopher Newport University, and Raymond Massa, Vaudreuil-Dorion, publishedEmotional, Social, and Cognitive Intelligence and Personality as Predictors of Sales Leadership Performance” on February 1st, 2012 in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies. To view other OnlineFirst articles, please click here.

The abstract:

Leaders of sales organizations must recruit and inspire salespeople to grow the organization. Skepticism remains about the role of emotional and social intelligence (ESI) in effective leadership. ESI is criticized as not providing distinctive variance in leadership performance beyond general intelligence and personality. This study assessed the role of the behavioral level of ESI competencies on leader performance. The number of new recruits was shown to predict new cash invested 6 years later. ESI significantly predicted leader performance (i.e., recruitment) whereas measures of generalized intelligence and personality did not. Adaptability and influence were two competencies distinctively predicting sales leadership performance.

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