CEO Wrongdoing: A Review of Pressure, Opportunity, and Rationalization

[Authors Karen Schnatterly of the University of Missouri, K. Ashley Gangloff
of the University of Missouri, and Anja Tuschke of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München recently published an article in the Journal of Management entitled “CEO Wrongdoing: A Review of Pressure, Opportunity, and Rationalization.” The article will be free to read for a limited time. Check out their video abstract! ]

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How Do CEOs Shape Corporate Culture?

In some ways, corporate culture is the personality Meeting Board Roomof a company, and just like human personalities, corporate cultures can vary widely. Many factors impact a company’s culture, but perhaps the most significant determining factor of culture is the values and actions of an organization’s senior leaders. In their article, “The Promise and Problems of Organizational Culture: CEO Personality, Culture, and Firm Performance,” published in the December 2014 issue of Group & Organization Management, authors Charles A. O’Reilly III of Standford University, David F. Caldwell of Santa Clara University, Jennifer A. Chatman of UC Berkeley, and Bernadette Doerr of UC Berkeley delve into the topic of organizational culture. Their paper specifically discusses how much a CEO’s personality impacts organizational culture, and how culture can in turn impact organizational performance.

home_coverThe abstract:

Studies of organizational culture are almost always based on two assumptions: (a) Senior leaders are the prime determinant of the culture, and (b) culture is related to consequential organizational outcomes. Although intuitively reasonable and often accepted as fact, the empirical evidence for these is surprisingly thin, and the results are quite mixed. Almost no research has jointly investigated these assumptions and how they are linked. The purpose of this article is to empirically link CEO personality to culture and organizational culture to objective measures of firm performance. Using data from respondents in 32 high-technology companies, we show that CEO personality affects a firm’s culture and that culture is subsequently related to a broad set of organizational outcomes including a firm’s financial performance (revenue growth, Tobin’s Q), reputation, analysts’ stock recommendations, and employee attitudes. We discuss the implications of these findings for future research on organizational culture.

You can read “The Promise and Problems of Organizational Culture: CEO Personality, Culture, and Firm Performance” from Group & Organization Management free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research from Group & Organization Management? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Out of Whack: On the Strength of Weak Ties

[Editor’s Note: We’re pleased to reproduce Journal of Management Inquiry‘s “Out of Whack” by Charles M. Vance.]

OfWRead “Out of Whack” for free from Journal of Management Inquiry by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest from Journal of Management Inquiry? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Top Five: Administrative Science Quarterly

asqAre you looking for cutting-edge, peer-reviewed research on organizational studies? Take a look at the top five articles currently being read in Administrative Science Quarterly. ASQ seeks to advance the understanding of management, organizations, and organizing in a wide variety of contexts, including teams, business and nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and markets. These papers are free to access through December 31 using the links below:

J. P. Eggers

Falling Flat: Failed Technologies and Investment under Uncertainty

Administrative Science Quarterly March 2012 57: 47-80

M. K. Chin, Donald C. Hambrick, and Linda K. Treviño

Political Ideologies of CEOs: The Influence of Executives’ Values on Corporate Social Responsibility

Administrative Science Quarterly June 2013 58: 197-232

Ethan S. Bernstein

The Transparency Paradox: A Role for Privacy in Organizational Learning and Operational Control

Administrative Science Quarterly June 2012 57: 181-216

Dennis A. Gioia, Kristin N. Price, Aimee L. Hamilton,and James B. Thomas

Forging an Identity: An Insider-outsider Study of Processes Involved in the Formation of Organizational Identity

Administrative Science Quarterly March 2010 55: 1-46

Jason P. Davis and Kathleen M. Eisenhardt

Rotating Leadership and Collaborative Innovation:Recombination Processes in Symbiotic Relationships

Administrative Science Quarterly June 2011

Administrative Science Quarterly, owned and managed by the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University, is a top-ranked, quarterly, peer-reviewed journal that publishes the best theoretical and empirical papers on organizational studies from dissertations and the evolving, new work of more established scholars, as well as interdisciplinary work in organizational theory, and informative book reviews. Browse the latest issue here, and sign up for e-alerts so you don’t miss out on future issues and articles published in OnlineFirst.

Top Five: Administrative Science Quarterly

asqAre you looking for cutting-edge, peer-reviewed research on organizational studies? Take a look at the top five articles currently being read in Administrative Science Quarterly. ASQ seeks to advance the understanding of management, organizations, and organizing in a wide variety of contexts, including teams, business and nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and markets. These papers are free to access through September 19 using the links below:

Isin Guler, Mauro F. Guillén, and John Muir Macpherson
Global Competition, Institutions, and the Diffusion of Organizational Practices: The International Spread of ISO 9000 Quality Certificates
June 2002

M. K. Chin, Donald C. Hambrick, and Linda K. Treviño
Political Ideologies of CEOs: The Influence of Executives’ Values on Corporate Social Responsibility
June 2013

Sarah Harvey and Chia-Yu Kou
Collective Engagement in Creative Tasks: The Role of Evaluation in the Creative Process in Groups
September 2013

Daniel M. Cable, Francesca Gino, and Bradley R. Staats
Breaking Them in or Eliciting Their Best? Reframing Socialization around Newcomers’ Authentic Self-expression
March 2013

Wolf-Christian Gerstner, Andreas König, Albrecht Enders, and Donald C. Hambrick
CEO Narcissism, Audience Engagement, and Organizational Adoption of Technological Discontinuities
June 2013

Administrative Science Quarterly, owned and managed by the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University, is a top-ranked, quarterly, peer-reviewed journal that publishes the best theoretical and empirical papers on organizational studies from dissertations and the evolving, new work of more established scholars, as well as interdisciplinary work in organizational theory, and informative book reviews. Browse the latest issue here, and sign up for e-alerts so you don’t miss out on future issues and articles published in OnlineFirst.

The ‘Arena’ of Top Management Selection

Editor’s note: We are pleased to welcome Claartje J. Vinkenburg of VU University in Amsterdam. Her paper “Arena: A Critical Conceptual Framework of Top Management Selection,” co-authored by Paul G. W. Jansen of VU Amsterdam, Nicky Dries of KU Leuven, and Roland Pepermans of VU Brussels, is forthcoming in Group & Organization Management and now available in the journal’s OnlineFirst section.

pullquoteAs a scholar of diversity and careers, I have long been fascinated by pathways to the top and how the labyrinth appears to be much less complicated to navigate for White, fit, 40-something men than others in practically any type of organization or profession. Over the years I have shifted focus from the individual to perceptions to the system in terms of trying to explain this phenomenon. The selection process by which some people end up in top positions and others do not is largely uncharted territory, even if it resonates with academics and practitioners alike. Conceptualizing that process as an arena and bringing together relevant theories and empirical findings from different fields was a major challenge, but a journey I much enjoyed.

GOM_72ppiRGB_150pixwThe largest surprise to me was that there was indeed very little to go on in terms of empirical evidence on top management selection, even if there is a lot of experience on this topic among management development professionals and executive searchers as well as numerous career stories from incumbents of top management positions as evidenced in biographies, movies, and other popular sources. The main reason for the lack of research on top management selection I think is because this is a very small and very inaccessible population to study, with accounts of selection decisions only available in retrospect rather than in vivo.

I hope our conceptualization of top management selection as an arena, which is inherently different from regular selection at lower organizational levels, with its own unique structural conditions, situational components, and cognitive features, inspires further qualitative and even ethnographic research on how this type of selection plays out across different contexts and that insights thus gained may lead to an improved, more inclusive selection process for top managers.

Read the paper, “Arena: A Critical Conceptual Framework of Top Management Selection,” online in Group & Organization Management.

Claartje Vinkenburg is associate professor of organizational behavior at the Amsterdam Center for Career Research, VU University. Claartje’s research focuses on (gender) diversity in careers, especially in science and in professional service firms. She has published in the Journal of Social Issues and Leadership Quarterly, and edited a book on “Top potentials” for the Dutch Foundation for Management Development with Roland Pepermans.

Paul Jansen is full professor of industrial psychology at VU University, and gradu – ated, cum laude, in 1979, in Mathematical Psychology at the University of Nijmegen. His research interests are in management development, careers, assessment, and performance management. Paul Jansen has published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Vocational Behavior, and Journal of Management Studies.

Nicky Dries is a research professor at KU Leuven. She was a visiting scholar at VU Amsterdam, Tilburg University, WU Vienna, Reykjavik University, and Boston University. Nicky is on the editorial board of Journal of Vocational Behavior and European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology. Her research interests are talent, human potential, and subjective success. She is an active member of the 5C and the Career Adaptability/Life Design project.

Roland Pepermans is full professor at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, work & organizational psychology. He teaches Organizational Behavior, Managerial Psychology and Human Resource Management. His research relates to social exchange processes at work in profit and non-profit organizations, with applications to high-potential management as well as to volunteering.