No texting, plz! :)

laptop-and-cellphone-1269437-mIt can be discouraging for instructors who, after taking the time to prepare a lesson plan, find their students texting rather than taking notes in class. Educators across all disciplines and state lines are faced with the dilemma of how to respond. Is it a sign of disrespect or simply the burgeoning of a new generational divide?

A closer look at the numbers shows that the issue isn’t limited to a few problem students. A study conducted by Barney McCoy of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln found that of the 777 students surveyed, more than 80% admitted to using their phone for non-academic related reasons during class. Undergraduates were the heaviest users, reaching for their phones an average of 11 times per school day, while graduate students came in at an average of 4 uses. Business and Professional Communication Quarterly Editor Melinda Knight discusses this issue in her editorial entitled “What to Do About Texting?”

Right before the first required oral presentation in this class, I asked everyone once again to BPCQ.inddturn phones off and give full attention to each speaker. As I was saying this, one student, whom I had previously asked to stop texting on several occasions, continued to text away until I stopped speaking all together. Usually, this kind of dramatic action will help make everyone aware of the problem, yet for the rest of the semester I had only limited success in convincing students that texting during class and especially when others were giving presentations was not professional behavior. Worse yet, I continually had to answer the same questions from students who did not hear what we had previously discussed because of texting. Perhaps the apparent lack of respect for everyone, instructor and students, is what has bothered me the most about this problem.

You can read “What to Do About Texting?” and the March issue of Business and Professional Communication Quarterly free for the next two weeks! Click here to access the editorial and here to access the Table of Contents. Like what you read? Click here to sign up for e-alerts from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly!

Book Review: Oh myyy! There goes the Internet: Life, the Internet, and everything

16275207George Takei has made quite a splash in the world of social media in the last few years.The former Star Trek actor currently has 1.42 million followers on Twitter and nearly 8 million Facebook likes. In 2013, Takei released a book detailing his rise in internet stardom entitled “Oh myyy! There goes the Internet: Life, the Internet, and everything.” Stephanie Kelly of North Carolina A&T State University recently published a review of this book in Business and Professional Communication Quarterly.

Takei, G. (2013). Oh myyy! There goes the Internet: Life, the Internet, and everything. New York,NY: Limited Liability Company. 244 pp.

From the review:

In 1966, actor George Takei was propelled to fame for his role as Hikaru Sulu, helmsman of the USS Enterprise, on the television series Star Trek. Today, Takei is more famous than ever for his BPCQ.inddpresence in a different medium. He manages one of the most popular Facebook pages in the world with over six million followers. In 2013, Takei published a book chronicling his experience with social media titled Oh Myyy! There Goes the Internet: Life, the Internet, and Everything. The book explains his rise to online fame through first Twitter and then Facebook in a volume full of humor, life lessons, and practical Internet marketing advice. The practical advice and honest discussion of the dark side of social media make the book a surprisingly useful text for business students.

The need to train business students in the appropriate use of social media is well documented (e.g., Kelly, Christen, & Snyder, 2013; McEachern, 2011; Meredith, 2012; Sacks & Graves, 2012). Though today’s college students excel as users of social media for personal purposes, they often do not receive training in professional uses of social media. Although it is not an academic text, Oh Myyy! There Goes the Internet provides an excellent overview of how social media should and should not be used in professional settings.

You can read the rest of the review for free by clicking here. Like what you read? You can get notified of all the latest reviews and research from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly by clicking here to sign up for e-alerts!

Call For Reviewers for Business and Professional Communication Quarterly!

BPCQ.inddBusiness and Professional Communication Quarterly is looking for reviewers!

Business and Professional Communication Quarterly is the only refereed journal devoted to research that advances the teaching of communication in the workplace. This journal publishes scholarship that advances knowledge about business and professional communication pedagogy and praxis in both academic and workplace settings. Articles present a variety of theoretical, applied, and practical approaches and perspectives, including technical and scientific communication, rhetoric, program design and assessment, the impact of technology, sustainability, global and multicultural issues, nonprofit communication, qualitative and quantitative research on classroom teaching, and case studies of best practices.

Reviewers will evaluate articles in the peer-review process and provide reports to the editorial office.

More information on becoming a reviewer for Business and Professional Communication Quarterly can be found by clicking here. Ready to sign up now? Click here to go directly to the Business and Professional Communication Quarterly manuscript submission site. You can also email Editor Melinda Knight directly at BPCQEditor@mail.montclair.edu.

Want to get notified of all the research and news like this from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

 

Business Communication Quarterly Is Now Business and Professional Communication Quarterly!

BPCQ.inddBusiness Communication Quarterly is now Business and Professional Communication Quarterly! According to the editorial by editor Melinda Knight, the name change “recognizes the multi- trans- and interdisciplinary nature of the fields that now represent business and professional communication.”

James M. Dubinsky, Executive Director of the Association for Business Communication and Managing Editor of Business and Professional Communication Quarterly, explains:

The reasoning behind the change from BCQ to BPCQ is a bit less transparent, but it is equally in line with our strategic work, resulting from our focus on disciplinary questions such as the following: What kinds of disciplinary backgrounds do our faculty have? How are issues in business communication relevant to other fields such as technical or scientific communication and vice-versa? What kinds of research methodologies are relevant, and where are their intellectual and methodological roots? The name change reflects our understanding of the answers to these questions and addresses the increasing interdisciplinary of our field.

The latest issue of Business and Professional Communication Quarterly kicks off the year with articles on social media, smart phones, texting and more. Click here to access the table of contents for the June issue. Want to keep up with all the news and research from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!