Can Undocumented Immigrants Be Protected From Wage Theft?

A study done by Pew Hispanic Center found that undocumented immigrants living in the United States earned a median household income of $36,000, $14,000 less than their legal and native-born counterparts, despite the fact that many households had more working members. These workers are also more susceptible to situations where employment laws aren't followed, as … Continue reading Can Undocumented Immigrants Be Protected From Wage Theft?

How Do Gendered Behavioral Norms Influence Sri Lankan Women’s Views of Workplace Sexual Harassment?

On July 21, 1960, Sirimavo Bandaranaike became Sri Lanka's prime minister, a role never before held by a woman in any country. However, discrimination and sexual harassment against women in the workplace still afflict the country today. But do cultural gendered behavioral norms influence the perception of sexual harassment in Sri Lanka? Author Arosha S. … Continue reading How Do Gendered Behavioral Norms Influence Sri Lankan Women’s Views of Workplace Sexual Harassment?

How Do Employers Handle Termination Documentation?

One only has to do a quick internet search on job termination practices to find pages upon pages of advice ranging from legal tips to breaking the bad news. But is there a set procedure that employers follow when it comes to the documentation of a termination? That's what authors Mike Duncan and Jillian Hill … Continue reading How Do Employers Handle Termination Documentation?

Did You Hear? When Rumors Are Used As Revenge At Work

According to a 2008 study done by the publishers of the Myers-Briggs Assessment and the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument, 85% of employees at all levels are involved in workplace conflict to some degree. In the United States alone, time spent dealing with this conflict equates to an average of 2.8 hours weekly, or approximately $359 … Continue reading Did You Hear? When Rumors Are Used As Revenge At Work

Summer Reading: Corporate Wrongdoing and the Art of Accusation

Looking for some summer reading for those hazy, lazy days of July? Donald Palmer's review of Robert R. Faulker's book "Corporate Wrongdoing and the Art of Accusation" appeared in the June issue of Administrative Science Quarterly. Robert R. Faulker: Corporate Wrongdoing and the Art of Accusation. New York: Anthem Press, 2011. 192 pp. $32.95, paper. … Continue reading Summer Reading: Corporate Wrongdoing and the Art of Accusation

How Much is the Organizational Power Structure to Blame for Corrupt Behavior?

Is it easier for someone to be corrupt at different levels within an organization? Does corruption depend on the resources available? Authors István Jávor and David Jancsics discuss this topic in their article from Administration and Society  entitled "The Role of Power in Organizational Corruption: An Empirical Study," winner of the 2014 Best Article Award from the Public … Continue reading How Much is the Organizational Power Structure to Blame for Corrupt Behavior?

Are CO-OP’s the Future of Health Care?

According to the White House, 8 million people signed up for private insurance in the Health Insurance Marketplace under the Affordable Care Act and 5 million more people are covered by plans outside the Marketplace that meet the standards of the ACA. However, the White House predicts that by 2016 5.7 million people will still … Continue reading Are CO-OP’s the Future of Health Care?

Check Please! Servers’ Choice of Speediness vs Sales and the Significance for Staffing

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the median annual wage of waiters and waitresses to be $18,590. With this in mind, one would assume that servers would welcome any opportunity to upsell their customers in order to raise income. But a new study recently published by Cornell Hospitality Quarterly found that restaurant employees … Continue reading Check Please! Servers’ Choice of Speediness vs Sales and the Significance for Staffing

Can We Find the Positive in Academic-Practitioner Tensions?

Albert Einstein is quoted to have said, "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not.” In their editorial essay "Academics and Practitioners Are Alike and Unlike: The Paradoxes of Academic-Practitioner Relationships" from Journal of Management, Jean Marie Bartunek of Boston College and Sara Lynn Rynes of the University of Iowa discuss the … Continue reading Can We Find the Positive in Academic-Practitioner Tensions?