The Stress of Cyber Incivility at Work

5630090047_5922a8afeb_zCyber bullying has been an emerging issue in recent years, and recent news, like the recent suicide of firefighter Nicole Mittendorff, have brought to light just how pervasive and harmful cyber bullying can be in the workplace. A recent article published in Journal of Management, entitled “Daily Cyber Incivility and Distress: The Moderating Roles of Resources at Work and Home” from authors YoungAh Park, Charlotte Fritz, and Steve M. Jex delves into the topic of cyber incivility, pinpointing how cyber incivility can cause lasting distress in employees. The abstract for the paper:

Given that many employees use e-mail for work communication on a daily basis, this study examined within-person relationships between day-level incivility via work e-mail (cyber incivility) and employee outcomes. Using resource-based theories, we Current Issue Coverexamined two resources (i.e., job control, psychological detachment from work) that may alleviate the effects of cyber incivility on distress. Daily survey data collected over 4 consecutive workdays from 96 employees were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. Results showed that on days when employees experienced cyber incivility, they reported higher affective and physical distress at the end of the workday that, in turn, was associated with higher distress the next morning. Job control attenuated the concurrent relationships between cyber incivility and both types of distress at work, while psychological detachment from work in the evening weakened the lagged relationships between end-of-workday distress and distress the following morning. These findings shed light on cyber incivility as a daily stressor and on the importance of resources in both the work and home domains that can help reduce the incivility-related stress process. Theoretical and practical implications, limitations, and future research directions are discussed.

You can read “Daily Cyber Incivility and Distress: The Moderating Roles of Resources at Work and Home” from Journal of Management free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to keep current on all of the latest research from Journal of ManagementClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Image attributed to Mislav Marohnic (CC)

Read the New Virtual Special Issues from The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science!

We’re pleased to announce six new virtual special issues from The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science! Compiled by The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science associate editors Jean M. Bartunek and Jean E. Neumann, these research collections include titles such as “Action Research,” “Planned Change,” “Paradox and Contradictions” among others. Each collection contains a generous number of articles exploring group dynamics, organization development, and social change.

The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science editor William Pasmore introduced these collections:

We are very pleased to launch virtual collections of articles on themes JABS_72ppiRGB_powerpointthat have defined what JABS has stood for as a journal devoted to change for the past fifty years. Having these outstanding contributions in one location will enhance access to the ideas they present and hopefully, inspire continued scholarship of similar quality and purpose. In the future, we will be curating virtual collections on specific topics related to change, such as change readiness and factors that influence the success of change efforts. We hope you will look forward to examining these virtual collections. They are one more way that JABS can contribute to the advancement of science and practice in the arena of organizational and societal change.

You can click here to view all six of the virtual special issues from The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. Like what you read? You can sign up to have all the latest news and research from The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science sent right to your inbox. Just click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Unlimited Free Access to Unscripted Voices of 21st Century Workers “On the Front Line”

gears-94220_640[We’re pleased to welcome Paul Brook, one of the editors of Work, employment, society. All 10 articles in the On the Front Line (OTFL) collection are being made permanently free as part of Work, employment and society’s wider commitment to public sociology.]

These powerful testimonies of employees’ accounts of their working lives form a series of vivid, ‘behind the scenes’, portraits of the contemporary world of work. Each story is told frankly and all brim with a rich mixture of hope, despair, enjoyment and anger, revealing the hidden, often harsh, realities of work in the 21st century.

These popular and compelling stories are being increasingly used for university teaching but can now be taken-up by schools, colleges and others keen to get ‘under the skin’ of today’s world of work and employment. In doing so, we hope to introduce individuals and groups outside of the academy, especially young people, to the richness of what C. Wright Mills called the “sociological imagination”.

F1.mediumThe OTFL collection includes accounts of the indignities of working as a cleaner in a luxury hotel; an activist’s story during a protracted factory strike; the dangerous health consequences for a slimming club consultant striving to ‘look the part’; the unremitting time demands on a supermarket manager; the endemic abuse and violence suffered by a trainee haute cuisine chef in Michelin starred kitchens; and the personal struggles of a pioneer woman priest.

OTFL also offers first-hand accounts of major political-industrial events, such as working inside HBOS bank during the 2008 financial crisis; a pit supervisor’s experience of Britain’s miners’ strike of 1984-85; organising inside the factory occupation movement as part of the Argentinian anti-IMF uprising of 2001-02; and the disturbing account of work under hazardous conditions in a Scottish plastics factory shortly before a devastating explosion that killed nine workers in 2004.

Unlike standard research articles, OTFL contributions are co-authored by the worker and an academic/s. Each one is preceded by a brief scene-setting commentary written by the academic. If you would like to write an OTFL article, the Work, employment and society website has guidance. You can also contact us to discuss your ideas further.

Making OTFL free access is part of Work, employment and society’s wider commitment to public sociology. We want to encourage more scholars to work with workers and employees, especially the less powerful, to help give voice to their hidden experiences and unheard views. We also want to make our small contribution to ensuring that workers’ experiences, views and ideas will not be consigned to the “enormous condescension of posterity”, as E.P. Thompson famously claimed was the fate of earlier generations of workers.

Are Gay Men Treated Differently in “Masculinized” Industries?

HRDR_72ppiRGB_powerpoint[We’re pleased to welcome Joshua C. Collins of the University of Arkansas. Dr. Collins recently published an article in Human Resource Development Review entitled “Characteristics of ‘Masculinized’ Industries: Gay Men as a Provocative Exception to Male Privilege and Gendered Rules.”]

Within the human resources and organizational behavior literature, male privilege is often framed as something that is garnered and experienced by all men, regardless of other personal identities or workplace culture and norms. This paper problematizes that assumption by demonstrating how certain characteristics of ‘masculinized’ industries–such as law enforcement, the military, oil and gas, and others–maintain structures that continue to impede and dictate the experiences of gay men. The purpose of this paper was to explore how gay men, in these industries, can become exceptions to male privilege and gendered rules, often being diminished or disregarded based on stereotypes related to perceived masculinity as it aligns with hegemonic industry expectations. The hope is that this study will influence future research and practice by bringing to attention the characteristics that limit gay men in these industries, as well as demonstrating how the use of a more critical conceptual approach might allow for a more nuanced view of male privilege across a variety of contexts.

You can read “Characteristics of ‘Masculinized’ Industries: Gay Men as a Provocative Exception to Male Privilege and Gendered Rules” from Human Resource Development Review for free by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research like this from Human Resource Development Review? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

8958_14_New_Facutly. Joshua Collins, COEHP.Joshua C. Collins, EdD, is an assistant professor in the Adult and Lifelong Learning master’s and doctoral programs at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, AR. He is currently the chair of the Critical and Social Justice Perspectives SIG (Special Interest Group) of the Academy of Human Resource Development. His research interests focus on issues related to critical adult learning and education, specificially with regard to racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities, as well as other disenfranchised groups

Stewart Clegg on Relationships in Organizations

valentines-day-theme-1-1413274-mStewart Clegg, widely acknowledged as one of the most significant contemporary theorists of power relations, recently collaborated with Miguel Pina e Cunha, Arménio Rego, and Joana Story on their article “Powers of Romance: The Liminal Challenges of Managing Organizational Intimacy” from Journal of Management Inquiry.

The abstract:

Problematic organizational relationships have recently been at the core of highly visible media coverage. Most analyses of sexual relations in organizations have been, however, JMI_72ppiRGB_powerpointsimplistic and unidimensional, and have placed insufficient systematic emphasis on the role of governmentality in the social construction of organizational romance. In this article, we proceed in two theoretical steps. First, we elaborate a typology of organizational romance that covers different manifestations of this nuanced process. We think of these as organizational strategies of governmentality. Second, we elaborate and identify liminal cases that fall into the interstices of the four predominant ways of managing sexual relationships in organizations. We think of these as vases of liquid love and life that evade the border controls of regulation by governmentality. Finally, we relate these issues to debates about the nature of the civilizational process and suggest hypotheses for future research.

You can read “Powers of Romance: The Liminal Challenges of Managing Organizational Intimacy” from Journal of Management Inquiry for free by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research like this from Journal of Management Inquiry? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Top Five: Advances in Developing Human Resources

ADHR_72ppiRGB_powerpointWant to know all about the latest research in human resource development? Take a look at the top five most read articles from Advances in Developing Human Resources! This journal explores problems and solutions in an organizational setting and discusses concepts for the future allowing scholars and practitioners to work more effectively in human resource development. These articles are free for you to read for the next 30 days.

Brad Shuck and Kevin Rose
Reframing Employee Engagement Within the Context of Meaning and Purpose: Implications for HRD
November 2013 15: 341-355

Sehoon Kim and Gary N. McLean
Global Talent Management: Necessity, Challenges, and the Roles of HRD
November 2012 14: 566-585

Sunny L. Munn
Unveiling the Work–Life System: The Influence of Work–Life Balance on Meaningful Work
November 2013 15: 401-417

Kristopher J. Thomas
Workplace Technology and the Creation of Boundaries: The Role of VHRD in a 24/7 Work Environment
August 2014 16: 281-295

Judy O’Neil and Victoria J. Marsick
Action Learning Coaching
May 2014 16: 202-221

Want to know about all the latest news and research like this from Advances in Developing Human Resources? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

 

 

Can Undocumented Immigrants Be Protected From Wage Theft?

take-the-buck-2-1096838-mA study done by Pew Hispanic Center found that undocumented immigrants living in the United States earned a median household income of $36,000, $14,000 less than their legal and native-born counterparts, despite the fact that many households had more working members. These workers are also more susceptible to situations where employment laws aren’t followed, as the fear of retaliation keeps many from reporting misconduct committed by their employer. Wage stealing is one such infraction that has gained national attention in the last few years. Just why and how does this happen? How can it be stopped? Author Jed DeVaro discusses this in his article “Stealing Wages From Immigrants” from Compensation and Benefits Review.

The abstract:

In California, ongoing concerns about employers stealing wages from undocumented immigrant workers (who areCBR_42_1_72ppiRGB_powerpoint reluctant to report employer violations because they want to minimize contact with legal authorities) have led to two “antiretaliation” laws passed in 2013 (Assembly Bill 263 and Senate Bill 666) designed to protect workers. This article describes wage stealing (when, how, why and to whom it happens) and its consequences and evaluates various solutions to the problem, including the recent California legislation.

Click here to read “Stealing Wages From Immigrants” from Compensation and Benefits Review for free! Want the latest research like this sent directly to your inbox? Click here to sign up for e-alerts from Compensation and Benefits Review!