Summer Reading: Corporate Wrongdoing and the Art of Accusation

Looking for some summer reading for those hazy, lazy days of July? Donald Palmer's review of Robert R. Faulker's book "Corporate Wrongdoing and the Art of Accusation" appeared in the June issue of Administrative Science Quarterly. Robert R. Faulker: Corporate Wrongdoing and the Art of Accusation. New York: Anthem Press, 2011. 192 pp. $32.95, paper. … Continue reading Summer Reading: Corporate Wrongdoing and the Art of Accusation

Sustainabilty in Family Businesses

How have family businesses responded to the call for sustainable practices? Authors Magali A. Delmas and Olivier Gergaud recently tested their hypothesis that family businesses tend to emphasize a more socially responsible attitude for themselves and their kin by studying family owned and operated wineries in California in their article "Sustainable Certification for Future Generations: … Continue reading Sustainabilty in Family Businesses

Embracing a Corporate Social Responsibility Agenda

Are companies who claim a corporate social responsibility agenda actually aligned with its value system? Line Schmeltz explored this topic in his research "Identical or Just Compatible? The Utility of Corporate Identity Values In Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility" from International Journal of Business Communication.  The abstract: This study explores whether companies embracing a corporate social … Continue reading Embracing a Corporate Social Responsibility Agenda

Who is Hurt By Corruption in the United States?

What is the economic impact of corruption? And who is hurt most by these misguided acts? Author Adriana S. Cordis discusses this topic in her article "Corruption and Composition of Public Spending in the United States" from Public Finance Review. The abstract: I investigate the relation between corruption and the composition of state government spending … Continue reading Who is Hurt By Corruption in the United States?

Is It Unfair to Blame Fast-Food Corporations for Obesity?

According to an online article from the Obesity Action Coalition, in the United States there are approximately three hundred thousand fast-food establishments and 33.8% percent of the country's population is obese. But how closely are the two connected? Who's to blame if they are? Judith Schrempf discusses this in her article "A Social Connection Approach … Continue reading Is It Unfair to Blame Fast-Food Corporations for Obesity?

Snowden and … Sophocles? Whistleblowing in Antigone

While figures like Edward Snowden and Julian Assange have been in the public eye in recent years, whistleblowers are not a new concept. Qui tam was a common law practice that began in thirteen century England that allowed an individual to bring charges against an entity who violated the law and receive compensation from the … Continue reading Snowden and … Sophocles? Whistleblowing in Antigone

Consumer Identification and Corporate Social Responsibility

Corporations are encouraged more and more to consider social responsibilities when producing their merchandise. But do the virtues advertised by these corporations actually affect consumers' decisions? Dr. Rosa Chun studied The Body Shop and its customers to see how they were influenced by The Body Shop's publicized ethics in her article, "What Holds Ethical Consumers … Continue reading Consumer Identification and Corporate Social Responsibility

Left, Right and CSR

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) means going above and beyond business interests to take action for the greater good of society. If a firm's CEO is politically liberal, is he or she more likely to advance CSR than a conservative leader? A new article published in Administrative Science Quarterly answers this question with a study of … Continue reading Left, Right and CSR