The Impact of Religion-Based Caste System on the Dynamics of Indian Trade Unions

[We’re pleased to welcome authors Jatin Pandey and Biju Varkkey of the Indian Institute of Management. They recently published an article in Business & Society entitled “Impact of Religion-Based Caste System on the Dynamics of Indian Trade Unions: Evidence From Two State-Owned Organizations in North India,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Dr. Pandey reflects on the inspiration for conducting this research:]

BAS_v50_72ppiRGB_powerpointWhat motivated you to pursue this research?

Caste and trade unions are two important stratification schemas prevalent in India but their interaction has been under-researched. Ramaswamy’s study in South India, which was conducted in 1976, had dealt with the issue of caste and trade unions directly and was based on empirical data collected from the unions of textile workers in Coimbatore. After that, there has been passing references to caste as an important facet in unions or opinion pieces by authors based on their personal observations; but there had been a paucity of studies, which look at the interface of caste and unions based on systematic data collection and analysis.

What has been the most challenging aspect of conducting your research? Were there any surprising findings surprise revelations?

Gathering data on the sensitive topic of caste was the most challenging. The political undertones of the topic make people skeptical about discussing it freely. In our research, initially, the trade union members negated the influence of caste in modern times however as we continued with the interview they revealed that caste not only had an impact in the workspace but their social space as well.

What advice would you give to new scholars and incoming researchers in this particular field of study?

Caste is a very sensitive and politically active topic in India and while interviewing researcher must be aware of these controversies and tensions. Continuous engagement with the respondents, developing trust and having an open communication regarding your intentions as a researcher aids during the interview process. Once the respondents get to understand that you are a “researchers” and not “politicians”; they open up easily and reveal data in the form of lived experiences and actual stories that provide rich data useful for in-depth studies. Also, it is not a good idea to start with the questions on caste during the initial phase of the interview, it’s better to start with topics like trade unions and then move on to caste

 

 

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Psychology and Developing Societies

Psychology needs to shift from an individual model to a holistic, contextual and cultural model to contribute meaningfully to the United Nations’ agenda for sustainable development 2030

The new UN development agenda for 2030 has health, including mental health (MH) and well-being (WB), as an important goal for sustainable development (SD). Psychology as a discipline can contribute to this agenda because it is at the crossroads, the intersection between the individual and the environment, and can guide the building of economic/social/cultural environments that sustain MH and WB along with physical health (PH). Psychology is also at the crossroads as a discipline. The current dominant scientific and increasingly biologically based paradigm of psychology deals only with the material aspects of existence and may not be adequate to the task of building a sustainable environment. It emphasizes the biological aspects of individual psychological functioning and leaves out the connection with and impact of the social environment on MH and WB.

PDSA new paradigm in psychology is called for, one that is based on a holistic model drawn from non-Western cultures that includes all the levels of functioning from the biological to the spiritual, and that addresses the individual’s relationship with the social and natural environment within which the individual has to function. It could integrate the scientific biological approach with indigenous theories of connection with nature and with community. This would change the paradigm to one that is more relevant to building a sustainable society that nurtures the health and WB of its members. Mainstream psychology can maintain the status quo and the dominance of scientific psychology, or shift to a paradigm with a holistic understanding of human functioning. This has implications for SD, including social policy and programme development and implementation. This article from ‘Psychology and Developing Societies’ will develop this argument within the framework of the new UN 2030 SD agenda, which is dependent on the creation of a social, cultural and economic environment that fosters ‘healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages’ (goal 3 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda).

Read full article here!

Abstract

The author argues that if psychologists are to contribute meaningfully to the United Nations’ agenda for sustainable development (SD) 2030, they will need to shift from a model that is biologically based individual model to a holistic, contextual and cultural model. Global media and consumer culture have created unhealthy, social and cultural environments, which are seen as having an adverse effect on psychological health. The article focuses on the culture change coming about due to advancement of technology, changes in values of society and acculturation as the reasons for decrement in mental health (MH) and well-being (WB). Integration of mainstream psychology with indigenous psychology can guide building of environments that sustain physical health and MH as well as societal sustainability.

Click here to read Psychology at the Crossroads: Sustainable Development or Status Quo? for free from Psychology and Developing Societies.

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Macro-Social Marketing and Gun Violence in America

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Traditionally marketing has focused on how to change individual’s behavior in order to buy a product. What media strategies can increase sales, and how to associate values with products? With the advent of the social marketing fields, analysis focused on how conventional marketing tools could be used to change behavior to improve one’s well being and address social problems. While there is a wealth of literature that looks at how government agencies can utilize marketing tools to effect individuals engaged in certain behavior, there has been little research on how NGO’s utilize the same tools to alter behavior and invoke policy changes.

Researchers and Authors Aimee Dinnin Huff, Michelle Barnhart, Brandon McAlexander, and Jim McAlexander perform a pertinent expansion of this field by  looking at how American Gun Violence Prevention groups (GVPGS) act as macro-social marketers.

They recently published in article in the Journal of Macromarketing entitled, “Addressing the Wicked Problem of American Gun Violence: Consumer Interest Groups as Macro-social Marketers,” which is free to read for a limited time. The abstract for the article is below:

Building on work on social and macro-social marketing, we provide an empirical account of ways in which American gun violence prevention groups (GVPGs) act as macro-social marketers as they address the wicked problem of gun violence, which they define as deaths and injuries with firearms. We find that, as a collective, GVPGs attempt to change the culture related to guns by targeting up-, mid-, and downstream agents. We contribute to theory by (1) expanding the concept of macro- social marketing beyond government entities to include consumer interest groups and collectives; (2) introducing internal marketing as a macro-social marketing tool critical for macro-social marketers dependent largely on volunteers; (3) elucidating ways that macro-social marketers can accomplish upstream changes indirectly, by encouraging consumers and citizens to influence policy makers; and (4) revealing marketing tactics that can be leveraged across up-, mid-, downstream, and internal efforts.

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The Evolution and Prospects of Service-Dominant Logic Research

[We’re pleased to welcome author Dr. Ralf Wilden of Newcastle Business School, University of Newcastle, Australia. Dr. Wilden recently published an article in the Journal of Service Research entitled “The Evolution and Prospects of Service-dominant Logic Research: An Investigation of Past, Present, and Future Research,” which is currently free to read for a limited time.” Below, Dr. Wilden reflects on the inspiration for conducting this research:]

02JSR13_Covers.inddService innovation is a driving force of economic growth in developed economies. Large corporations, such as BMW and IBM, increasingly define their business as service centric. For example, the BMW Group has moved away from defining their value proposition being focused on cars and motorcycles to positioning themselves as a mobility provider, thus moving away from a product-centered to service-centered narrative. The ‘servitization’ of traditional business models converges with a growing academic discourse around the emergence and evolution of the so-called ‘service-dominant logic’. Ongoing studies in this area explore the value of service in dynamic exchange systems and how managers are responding to or guided by ideas that 1) service forms the basis of all economic exchange, 2) value is always co-created between relevant actors, and 3) so-called operant resources are central to value co-creation.

In a recent study in the Journal of Service Research, an international team of researchers studied existing research to uncover core concepts and thematic shifts in the development of new knowledge in this field. More specifically, they studied how service-dominant logic advances the understanding of how value is created and service is innovated in dynamic service ecosystems. Based on a citation analyses and text mining of more than 300 key articles, the authors identify how service-dominant logic bridges traditional service research (e.g., regarding satisfaction, quality and customer experiences) with strategic and systems views. However, looking at the evolution of service-dominant logic research over time, it appears focus on strategic research has waned. Thus, the authors argue future studies should draw on several specific research areas to develop frameworks to aid managers in strategically thinking about service design and innovation.

The results from this study verify service-dominant logic is highly influential in areas such as customer engagement and value cocreation. An underlying shift towards social and systemic perspectives is also evident. However, many valuable insights emerging from the wealth of relevant studies have not yet impacted research regarding managerial decision-making and strategy development on a large scale. Furthermore, the authors identify the need to develop a stronger understanding of the way service-dominant logic can be used to inform how managerial actions and social and cultural practices influence and are influenced by a wider service ecosystem. For example, Ralf Wilden says “the way organizations engage in innovation-related activities has changed from a firm-centric model to a model that stresses the importance of knowledge in-flows and out-flows across organizational boundaries.” He adds, “despite the commonly accepted importance of services in value creation activities our knowledge about the role of open innovation in service ecosystems is limited.” The authors further stress that service thinking has benefited from interdisciplinary research in the past. Moving forward, combining service-dominant research with organizational strategy insights in the area of open innovation, dynamic capabilities and microfoundations, together with social, cultural and systems theories, can lead to developing new knowledge regarding service and drive continual improvement in service design and innovation.

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Call for Papers: The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science


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The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science is currently receiving manuscripts through this manuscript submission portal.

With diverse audiences in mind, The Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences publishes a variety of material designed to help individuals and organizations promote positive, successful change. The specific goals of the journal are to:

  • Present a range of conceptual frameworks that explain, predict, and illuminate the implications of action
  • Describe social inventions, intervention techniques, consultation activities, emergent innovations, and educational practices
  • Employ the full range of social science
  • Examine underlying values, assumptions, biases, and beliefs associated with various forms of change

Do you have a manuscript that best fits the aims & scope of JABS? Click here to view the full submission guidelines and submit your manuscript today!

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Journal of Management Inquiry: Corruption Special Issue

JMI_72ppiRGB_powerpoint.jpgThe July 2017 Special Issue of the Journal of Management Inquiry is now online to view! This issue focuses on the phenomenon of corporate corruption, with specific topics such as counterproductive behavior, corporate culture and ethics, and media framing. Below is an excerpt from the special issue introduction entitled “Expanding Research on Corporate Corruption, Management, and Organizations,” from authors Stelios Zyglidopoulos, Paul Hirsch, Pablo Martin de Holan, and Nelson Phillips:

Corruption is a major problem in much of the world. It often prevents economic development, causes inefficiency and unfairness in the distribution of resources, can be the underlying factor behind corporate failures and industry crises, can erode the social fabric of societies, and can have other major negative impacts in the well-being of individuals and societies….But, before we proceed to discuss the topic of corruption research, we should address the issue of what corruption is and note its complexity. Transparency International (2017) defines corruption as “the abuse of entrusted power for private gain.” Similarly, Ashforth, Gioia, Robinson, and Treviño (2008) define corruption as “the illicit use of one’s position of power for perceived personal or collective gain” (p. 671). We believe we should enrich and expand this definition by differentiating between first- and second-order corruption….In this special issue, our purpose is not only to renew and extend the research agenda around corporate corruption, so that we can contribute toward a more sophisticated and complex understanding, but also to facilitate communication between different researchers.

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Call for Papers: Business & Society’s Special Issues

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Business & Society is currently accepting manuscripts for two special issues.

Please click here for details on how to submit to “Modern slavery in business.”

Please click here for details on how to submit to “Corporations, capitalism and society.”

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