Using Gaming to Help Stroke Recovery

tablet-pc-299974-mAccording to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 795,000 people in the United States experience a stroke every year. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke states that there are about 4 million people living in the United States living with the effects of a stroke, which can include problems such as weakness or paralysis on one side of the body, trouble using language both verbally and written, and memory issues among other complications. Recovery takes a great amount of skill, time and support. In a recent study published in Simulation and Gaming entitled “Stroke Patient Rehabilitation: A Pilot Study of an Android-Based Game,” researchers designed and tested a tablet game aimed at helping recent stroke patients recover damaged motor skills.

The abstract:

Background Cerebral vascular accidents (strokes) are the primary cause of disability worldwide and the second leading cause of death both in the Philippines and internationally. In recent years, a number of computer-based applications have been developed to assist in the stroke recovery process.

S&G_2014_C1 template.inddAim This article discusses an Android-based tablet game, FINDEX, that aids in the rehabilitation process of stroke survivors with impaired fine motor skills.

Method FINDEX was designed and developed in the Philippines. The game contains assessment and monitoring support for tracking the patient’s progress in terms of fine finger dexterity, for example, finger control, isolation and coordination, and range of motions. The baselines for data comparison and analysis were gathered through an initial test with subjects with normal hand function. Three stroke survivors then participated in a pilot study, using the game for a total of nine testing sessions.

Results Objective measures showed that patients’ dexterity did in fact improve, although it is not possible to draw strong conclusions because of the small sample size. In subsequent interviews, patients indicated that they believed that the games helped in their recovery and said that they preferred playing with the game over performing the standard therapeutic activities.

Conclusion The development of this game and the preliminary findings from the pilot study suggest that games may indeed be effective instruments for therapy.

Click here to read “Stroke Patient Rehabilitation: A Pilot Study of an Android-Based Game” for free from Simulation and Gaming. Want to be notified about all the latest research like this from Simulation and Gaming? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

What is the “Global Brain”?

380_wpm_lowresJust what is the “Global Brain”? In his article “Global Brain and the Future of Human Society,” Cadell Last defines the Global Brain as a leading hypothesis explaining the current evolution of the human system. Last, whose work has appeared in publications such as the Scientific American and Humanity+ Magazine, believes that the Internet is allowing a centralized space for intellectual evolution. People can now pool new ideas,  knowledge and feelings from all parts of the globe and easily share them with one another. According to his Microryza campaign, Last hopes that with research and development of a systems-level theoretical understanding of human evolution, humans could chart the possible future evolution of institutions, such as religions and medicine, and what their role would be in everyday lives. His article was recently published in World Future Review.

The abstract:

The Global Brain is a leading hypothesis explaining the current evolution of the human system. Recent multidisciplinary research at the Global Brain Institute has laid a potential framework for thinking about the future of human society within the context of the emergence of a global brain this century. In this article, I outline the theory ofWFR_72ppiRGB_powerpoint challenge propagation and explain how this theory can help us formulate an empirical understanding of the future of individual and collective human experience with a global brain. This includes a prescriptive and predictive analysis of the future of governance and religion. The article invites discussion as well as critical and constructive feedback as its sole purpose is to stimulate a decentralized discussion that will help us all better understand the future of human organization in the twenty-first century.

Click here to read “Global Brain and the Future of Human Society” for free from World Future Review. Want to know about more articles like this from World Future Review? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Could Smartphones Become a Teaching Tool?

hand-holding-mobile-smart-phone-1417191-mA quick internet search of “smartphone etiquette in class” will give you a fairly straightforward answer: don’t use your phone. But what if instructors could use smartphone technology to their advantage instead? A new article published in Business and Professional Communication Quarterly entitled “Multitasking With Smartphones in the College Classroom” examines the idea of using smartphones to help enhance students’ learning rather than interfere with it.

The abstract:

Although the concept of multitasking itself is under debate, smartphones do enable users to divert attention fromBPCQ.indd the task at hand to nongermane matters. As smartphone use becomes pervasive, extending into our classrooms, educators are concerned that they are becoming a major distraction. Does multitasking with smartphones impede learning? Can they be used to enhance learning instead? This article reviews current literature, provides suggestions for further investigation, and proposes an approach to incorporate smartphone multitasking in the classroom to enhance learning.

 

Video: Taxonomy of Serious Games for Business

When Marco Greco decided he wanted to create a collaborative creative of business games, he realized he had one major problem: the taxonomy of serious games for business was unclear. Dr. Greco collaborated with Nicola Baldissin and Fabio Nonino to create a taxonomy that would work for scholars of the business gaming community in their article published in Simulation and Gaming entitled “An Exploratory Taxonomy of Business Games.”

Dr. Greco discussed his paper in a recent interview:

Read “An Exploratory Taxonomy of Business Games” from Simulation and Gaming for free by clicking here. Want to keep up with Simulation and Gaming? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Understanding Networking and its Benefits

teamwork-1-1254520-m[We are pleased to welcome Špela Trefalt to Management Ink. Dr. Trefalt’s article “How Network Properties Affect One’s Ability to Obtain Benefits: A Network Simulation” recently appeared in the OnlineFirst section of the Journal of Management Education.]

About four years ago, I started teaching about networks in Executive Education Programs at Simmons School of Management. I wanted to help the participants understand and appreciate the importance of structural properties of networks (centrality, structural holes, multiplexity, strength of ties) and social capital, and I couldn’t find a good way to do that. Lecturing to a group of highly-competent professionals was not my style and I couldn’t find an exercise that would convey these points. So I developed one. Since they, I’ve tried it out with multiple groups of executives and MBA students as well as with undergraduates, and it always worked very well. Students enjoyed it but also learned from it. This is a very low-tech exercise, so get ready for some printing and filling up some envelopes but I promise the investment is worthwhile.

The abstract:

JME_72ppiRGB_powerpointNetworks and the social capital that they carry enable people to get things done, to prosper in their careers, and to feel supported. To develop an effective network, one needs to know more than how to make connections with strangers at a reception; understanding the consequences of network properties on one’s ability to obtain benefits is essential. Such understanding enables students to better assess who to connect to. The simulation described herein enables participants to experience and therefore better understand the consequences of their position within a network and to overcome potential aversion to networking by recognizing its benefits and potential for reciprocity. It has been used effectively with undergraduates, MBA students, and executive audiences.
spela-trefalt_rdax_200x278Dr. Špela Trefalt joined Simmons faculty in 2008, after earning her D.B.A. in Management from the Harvard Business School, her M.B.A. from the University of Kansas, and her B.A. in Law from the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia. In her research, Dr. Trefalt focuses on the issues of managing the competing demands of work and life outside of work, especially among professionals. She is particularly interested in the role of relationships at work in this process. Her research aims at deepening our understanding of the experiences of individuals with work and non-work demands in order to provide ideas for improving individuals’ well-being by combining their own agency and organizational change. She teaches in the MBA and in Executive Education programs. Prior to her academic career, Trefalt spent six years as a human resources management consultant, and eight years working in the media in Slovenia.

Trying to Improve Marketing Education?

Interested in developing your marketing instruction? Check out the Journal of Marketing Education‘s new Editor’scollege-443754-m Choice collection titled “Evidence-Based Methods for Improving Marketing Education.”

Topics include:

Click here to view the entire collection from the Journal of Marketing Education. Want to know about all the new articles from the Journal of Marketing EducationClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

Using Simulation as a Training Tool for Project Management

(cc)

(cc)

Educators work hard to make sure their pupils are prepared for their chosen field of work. Inside a classroom, however, this can prove challenging. Many teachers have begun turning to simulations that will help provide their students with the opportunity to put their knowledge to the test. In their article in Simulation and Gaming, “Evaluating a Project Management Simulation Training Exercise,”  Ki-Young Jeong and Ipek Bozkurt discuss their findings on using simulation as a training tool for  teaching students project management.

The abstract:

This research is an evaluation of a single-player, project management simulation training exercise. Our objective is to gain understanding about the extent to which it contributes to participants’ project management knowledge and skills. Results from pre- and post-simulation exercise questionnaires indicate that overall the simulation exercise S&G_2013_C1.inddsignificantly improves a participant’s conceptual knowledge about project management. It also indicates that participants with less experience achieve more knowledge improvement than those with more experience. Results further indicate that the actual performance of the exercise, which represents the educational value of the exercise, is primarily dependent on the post-project management knowledge of the participant established throughout the exercise, prior knowledge brought to the exercise, and the experience of the participant. We believe that these results indicate that the simulation training exercise is a valuable training tool, which both engineering and project managers can use.

Read “Evaluating a Project Management Simulation Training Exercise” in Simulation and Gaming for free by clicking here. Want to be notified of any new articles from Simulation and Gaming? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!