ASQ Improving Evidence Presentation: Resources and Tools

[The following post is re-blogged from the ASQ Blog. Click here to view the original article.] This is a post that contains resources and tools to improve evidence presentation, echoing one of ASQ’s most important initiatives. The ASQ blog will keep updating the post and we welcome crowdsourcing and sharing of ideas from management scholars … Continue reading ASQ Improving Evidence Presentation: Resources and Tools

Psychological Science Seeking Preregistered Replications

 [The following post is re-blogged from Method Space. Click here to view the original article.] Making a statement in the ongoing “replication” or “reproducibility crisis,” the journal Psychological Science will now accept a special class of research–based papers that report on attempts to re-create experiments that had influential findings and that were first published in … Continue reading Psychological Science Seeking Preregistered Replications

Benefits and Costs of Covert Research: An Analysis

[We’re pleased to welcome author Thomas Roulet of King's College, UK.  Roulet recently published an article in Organizational Research Methods entitled Reconsidering the Value of Covert Research: The Role of Ambiguous Consent in Participant Observation, co-authored by Michael J. Gill, Sebastien Stenger, and David James Gill. From Roulet:] What inspired you to be interested in this topic? We were inspired … Continue reading Benefits and Costs of Covert Research: An Analysis

How Surveys Provide Integrated Communication Skills

"Excuse me, can you spare a  a few minutes? We're conducting a survey and would greatly appreciate your responses." You've most likely heard these two sentences presented to you as you're walking briskly down a crowded street. The Internet is also a crowded street full of news, but we hope you can spare a few minutes to … Continue reading How Surveys Provide Integrated Communication Skills

Communities as Nested Servicescapes

[We’re pleased to welcome Xiaojing Sheng from the University of Texas at Rio Grande. Sheng co-authored a recently published article in the Journal of Service Research  entitled “Communities as Nested Servicescapes" with Penny Simpson and Judy Siguaw. From Sheng:] What inspired you to be interested in this topic? From groups of four to sixteen sipping margaritas in local … Continue reading Communities as Nested Servicescapes

Wide Research, Narrow Effects: Why Interdisciplinary Research – and Innovation – is Hard

[This blog post was originally featured on Organizational Musings, written by Administrative Science Quarterly's Editor, Henrich R. Greve. Click here to view the original post.] Interdisciplinary research is seen as very valuable for society and economy. Some of that could be hype, but there are some good examples of what it can do. You have probably … Continue reading Wide Research, Narrow Effects: Why Interdisciplinary Research – and Innovation – is Hard

The Chrysalis Effect: Publication Bias in Management Research

How well do published management articles represent the broader management research? To say that questionable research practices impact only a few articles ignores the broader, systemic issue effecting management research. According to authors Ernest Hugh O'Boyle Jr., George Christopher Banks, and Erik Gonzalez-Mulé, the high pressure for academics to publish leads many to engage in questionable … Continue reading The Chrysalis Effect: Publication Bias in Management Research

How are Research Methods Taught?

[This blog post was originally posted on the SAGE Connection - Insight blog. To read the original blog post and find more content from SAGE Connection - Insight, click here.] How can librarians better support faculty who teach research methods? What materials do students look for in their libraries? Sharlene Hesse-Biber, a celebrated research methods … Continue reading How are Research Methods Taught?

Bringing Foundational Research in from the Cold

[This post features an interview originally featured on the Social Science Space blog. You can find the original blog post here.] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJfdmT1UtBY Like a favorite quote that turns out not to have passed the lips of Churchill or Twain, foundational research often is honored as its interpreters see it and not as the original author presented it. … Continue reading Bringing Foundational Research in from the Cold

Relative and Absolute Change in Discontinuous Growth Models

[We're pleased to welcome Paul Bliese of University of South Carolina. Paul recently published an article in Organizational Research Methods entitled "Understanding Relative and Absolute Change in Discontinuous Growth Models: Coding Alternatives and Implications for Hypothesis Testing" with co-author Jonas W.B. Lang.] Jonas and I became interested in the topic because we kept encountering "transition events" … Continue reading Relative and Absolute Change in Discontinuous Growth Models