Notes on the Origin of “The Normalization of Corruption”

[We’re pleased to welcome back J.S. Nelson, Senior Fellow at the Zicklin Center for Business Ethics Research at Wharton, and an Advisor in the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Nelson recently published an article in the Journal of Management Inquiry entitled "The Normalization of Corruption." Notes from Nelson:] My forthcoming … Continue reading Notes on the Origin of “The Normalization of Corruption”

Wide Research, Narrow Effects: Why Interdisciplinary Research – and Innovation – is Hard

[This blog post was originally featured on Organizational Musings, written by Administrative Science Quarterly's Editor, Henrich R. Greve. Click here to view the original post.] Interdisciplinary research is seen as very valuable for society and economy. Some of that could be hype, but there are some good examples of what it can do. You have probably … Continue reading Wide Research, Narrow Effects: Why Interdisciplinary Research – and Innovation – is Hard

The Chrysalis Effect: Publication Bias in Management Research

How well do published management articles represent the broader management research? To say that questionable research practices impact only a few articles ignores the broader, systemic issue effecting management research. According to authors Ernest Hugh O'Boyle Jr., George Christopher Banks, and Erik Gonzalez-Mulé, the high pressure for academics to publish leads many to engage in questionable … Continue reading The Chrysalis Effect: Publication Bias in Management Research

How are Research Methods Taught?

[This blog post was originally posted on the SAGE Connection - Insight blog. To read the original blog post and find more content from SAGE Connection - Insight, click here.] How can librarians better support faculty who teach research methods? What materials do students look for in their libraries? Sharlene Hesse-Biber, a celebrated research methods … Continue reading How are Research Methods Taught?

Bringing Foundational Research in from the Cold

[This post features an interview originally featured on the Social Science Space blog. You can find the original blog post here.] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJfdmT1UtBY Like a favorite quote that turns out not to have passed the lips of Churchill or Twain, foundational research often is honored as its interpreters see it and not as the original author presented it. … Continue reading Bringing Foundational Research in from the Cold

Introducing Journal of Management Inquiry’s New Section: Generative Curiosity!

We are pleased to highlight the introduction of a new section in Journal of Management Inquiry. Dedicated to ideas and curiosity, the new Generative Curiosity section will provide a platform for content that identifies new or ignored facts, phenomenons, patterns, events or other issues of interest. Richard W. Stackman and David R. Hannah elaborate in the latest Editor's … Continue reading Introducing Journal of Management Inquiry’s New Section: Generative Curiosity!

Relative and Absolute Change in Discontinuous Growth Models

[We're pleased to welcome Paul Bliese of University of South Carolina. Paul recently published an article in Organizational Research Methods entitled "Understanding Relative and Absolute Change in Discontinuous Growth Models: Coding Alternatives and Implications for Hypothesis Testing" with co-author Jonas W.B. Lang.] Jonas and I became interested in the topic because we kept encountering "transition events" … Continue reading Relative and Absolute Change in Discontinuous Growth Models

A Review of Adventure Tourism Literature

[We are pleased to welcome Mingming Cheng of UTS Business School. Mingming recently published an article in Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research entitled "A Tri-Method Approach to a Review of Adventure Tourism Literature: Bibliometric Analysis and a Quantitative Systematic Literature Review" with co-authors Deborah Edwards, Simon Darcy, and Kylie Redfern.] What inspired you to … Continue reading A Review of Adventure Tourism Literature

Extreme-Team Research: An Approach to Overcoming Research Obstacles

Researching the performance and management of extreme teams, which work in unconventional environments on high-risk tasks, presents a number of unique challenges to researchers, including limitations on data collection and sample sizes. In a new article published in Journal of Management, entitled "An Approach for Conducting Actionable Research with Extreme Teams," authors Suzanne T. Bell, David M. … Continue reading Extreme-Team Research: An Approach to Overcoming Research Obstacles

The Role of Collaboration in Tourism Research

[We're pleased to welcome Gang Li of Deakin University. Gang recently published an article in Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research entitled "Temporal Analysis of Tourism Research Collaboration Network" with co-authors Wei Fan of Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Rob Law of Hong Kong Polytechnic University.] Network analysis is an effective tool for the study of … Continue reading The Role of Collaboration in Tourism Research