Journal of Management Education Special Issue: Behavioral Ethics

JME_72ppiRGB_powerpoint.jpgThe August 2017 Special Issue of the Journal of Management Education is now online! The eight new articles in this issue cover specific key topics including but not limited to moral awareness, cognitive biases, student self-assessment, and thoughtful decision making in an educational setting. Guest editors Jacob Park of Green Mountain College and Priscilla Elsass of Clark University help summarize the need for behavioral ethics research in pedagogy in their Editor’s Corner piece entitled “Behavioral Ethics and the New Landscape in Ethics Pedagogy in Management Education.” Below is an excerpt from their introduction:

Recent developments in the field of behavioral ethics, defined as “a field that seeks to understand how people actually behave when confronted with ethical dilemmas” (Bazerman & Tenbrunsel, 2011, p. 4), opens up the possibilities of teaching and studying ethics in new ways. Behavioral ethics research suggests that people are prone to predictable ethical lapses due to psychosocial and organizational influences, power differentials, and cultural practices (e.g., clan and in-group favoritism). For those who teach business ethics, a behavioral ethics perspective presents new challenges, including the need to develop students’ moral awareness, and their ability to recognize and effectively respond to both personal and organizational ethical dilemmas….Clearly, there is an urgent need to consider how ethics curricula and pedagogies may provide more effective approaches to understanding—before, during, and after—ethical lapses in this era of cross-cultural and global business enterprises with varied forms of institutional governance and corporate values.

Click here to continue reading the full introduction to the special issue. Visit the JME homepage to sign up for email alerts so you stay current with the latest management research!

Enhancing Student PsyCap in an Online Learning Environment

computer-room-314632-m[We’re pleased to welcome Joshua J. Daspit of Mississippi State University. Dr. Daspit recently published an article in Journal of Management Education with T. C. Mims of Texas Woman’s University and Staci M. Zavattaro of Mississippi State University entitled “The Role of Positive Psychological States in Online Learning: Integrating Psychological Capital Into the Community of Inquiry Framework.”]

The abstract:

  • What inspired you to be interested in this topic?

My colleagues and I found this topic interesting because in addition to conducting research, a large portion of our jobs is dedicated to working with students. Each of us uses online components within our classes or teaches courses that are fully online – as many instructors do today – and the idea started from a simple desire to understand how we can enhance student learning within an online environment.

  • Were there findings that were surprising to you?

To understand how learning occurs within the context of an online environment, we used the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework to conceptualize how learning occurs. The CoI suggests three presences exist within an online learning environment. First, there is a teaching presence that consists of course development and facilitation by the instructor. Second, a social presence exists when individuals interact with peers within the online context. Last, the CoI suggests that the other two factors influence an individual-level cognitive presence. In other words, the teaching and social presences influence student learning.

In this study, we extend the CoI framework to account for an additional presence. Specifically, we suggest that an additional, individual-level factor drives the student’s learning, and that factor is the individual student’s psychological capital (or PsyCap). PsyCap cJME_72ppiRGB_powerpointonsists of the student’s self-efficacy, hope, optimism, and resilience. Without these, we suggest, the student is likely to have difficulty learning.

After testing the relationships among PsyCap and the components of the CoI framework, we find that instructors are able to positively influence the student’s PsyCap via the teaching presence. Additionally, the student’s PsyCap has a positive influence on the social presence within the online environment, and most notably, PsyCap positively influences the student’s learning (i.e., cognitive presence).

  • How do you see this study influencing future research and/or practice?

In the article, we offer suggestions for specific ways that instructors of online courses can enhance the student’s PsyCap and thereby enhance the student’s learning. For example, instructors may utilize an online PsyCap training session early in the semester as such trainings are shown to positively enhance the PsyCap of individuals.

We look forward to suggestions from other instructors who have found innovative ways to enhance student PsyCap and learning in online courses.

You can read “The Role of Positive Psychological States in Online Learning: Integrating Psychological Capital Into the Community of Inquiry Framework” from Journal of Management Education by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research from Journal of Management Education? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!


Josh DaspitJoshua J. Daspit, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Management at Mississippi State University. His research interests include examining firm capabilities and innovation with a primary focus on absorptive capacity and family business. His work has appeared in Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice, Academy of Management Learning & Education, Journal of Managerial Issues, and other outlets. Prior to joining academia, he worked as a senior consultant for an international consulting firm and served as Director of Community Affairs for a member of Congress. (Follow him on Twitter: @JoshDaspit.)

TC MimsTina C. Mims, Ph.D., is currently serving as a Visiting Lecturer at Texas Woman’s University. Dr. Mims is a recently vetted PhD in Marketing after practicing marketing as VP & Director roles at Fortune 1000 firms. She is passionate regarding the preparation of both graduate and undergraduate students to have a competency based learning experience transferable to their chosen careers.

Staci ZavattaroStaci M. Zavattaro, Ph.D., is an associate professor of public administration at the University of Central Florida. Her main research interests include place branding and marketing, as well as social media use within the public sector. Her books include Cities for Sale (SUNY Press), Place Branding Through Phases of the Image (Palgrave Macmillan), and Social Media in Government: Theory and Practice (CRC Press). She serves as managing editor of Administrative Theory & Praxis and belongs at the Public Administration Theory Network, the Public Management Research Association, and the American Society for Public Administration.

What Do Students Think of Social Media in the Classroom?

designer-in-action-93129-mIt may not come as much of a shock to hear that young adults go on social media the most. According to Pew Research Center’s , 87% of Facebook users are between 18 and 29. As social media has become more popular, educators have jumped on board as well. A 2013 study done by Pearson Learning Solutions and the Babson Survey Research Group found that of the 8,000 faculty surveyed, 41% used social media as a teaching tool. But just how useful do students actually find social media in the classroom? Stacy Neier and Linda Tuncay Zayer explore this topic in their article “Students’ Perceptions and Experiences of Social Media in Higher Education” from Journal of Marketing Education.

The abstract:

Recent research has discussed the opportunities associated with the use of social media tools in the classroom, but has JME(D)_72ppiRGB_powerpointnot examined the perceptions students themselves hold about its usefulness in enhancing their educational experience. This research explores students’ perceptions of social media as an effective pedagogical tool. Undergraduate students in a midsized, private university taking a marketing course were surveyed about their social media usage and preferences as well as their perceptions regarding the use of social media in higher education. Additional qualitative data collection with students probed into motivations for social media use in education as well as instructor and university perceptions. Findings reveal openness to using social media in education, uncover interactive and information motives for its use, and offer theoretical and pedagogical implications. Importantly, we offer insights into how educators can strategically incorporate social media tools into the classroom as well as how the use of social media can potentially affect students’ views of the instructor and the university.

Click here to read “Students’ Perceptions and Experiences of Social Media in Higher Education” from Journal of Marketing Education. Want to have all the latest research like this sent directly to your inbox? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Top Five: Marketing Education

logo35This morning saw the start of the Marketing Educators Association 2015 Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada!

MEA is the premier international organization devoted to advancing the practice and scholarship of marketing education. The organization’s mission is to provide worldwide leadership in promoting the development and sharing of scholarship that enhances marketing education and advances marketing knowledge and practice.

In honor of this annual conference, we are pleased to bring you the top five most read articles from Journal of Marketing Education.

“Social Learning Theory: A Multicultural Study of Influences on Ethical Behavior” by Richard C. Hanna, Victoria L. Crittenden, and William F. Crittenden from April 2013.

JME(D)_72ppiRGB_powerpoint“Self-Directed Learning: A Tool for Lifelong Learning” by Stefanie L. Boyer, Diane R. Edmondson, Andrew B. Artis, and David Fleming from April 2014.

“The Future of Marketing Education: A Practitioner’s Perspective” by David Finch, John Nadeau, and Norm O’Reilly from April 2013

“Together We Innovate: Cross-Cultural Teamwork Through Virtual Platforms” by Rikke Duus and Muditha Cooray from December 2014.

“Assessing Teamwork Skills for Assurance of Learning Using CATME Team Tools” by Misty L. Loughry, Matthew W. Ohland, and David J. Woehr from April 2014.

Want to know about all the latest news and research like this from Journal of Marketing Education? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Do You Have Research on Marketing Education?

student-notes-702485-mJournal of Marketing Education provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, information, and experiences related to educating students of marketing and advertising. It is the leading peer-reviewed, international scholarly journal publishing articles on the latest techniques in marketing education, emphasizing new course content and effective teaching methods. It also addresses professional issues, including development of the curriculum, career development, and the state of the profession.

Journal of Marketing Education is accepting bylined articles from experts and practitioners on a wide range of topics related to marketing education, including:

  • JME(D)_72ppiRGB_powerpointEvidence-Based Methods for Improving Marketing Education
  • Recruiting and Developing the Student Mindset
  • Ethics
  • The Classroom and Teaching Tools
  • Social Media

Click here to get more information on submitting to Journal of Marketing Education!

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What is the Role of Self-Efficacy in Sales Education?

business-graphics-1428641-mDid you know that sales is one of the top three careers for business graduates (Cummins, Peltier, Erffmeyer, & Whalen, 2013)? Perhaps you did, but did you also know that sales is among the top five jobs for nonbusiness graduates with majors in areas like agriculture, art, biology, communications, computers, math, education, engineering, humanities, industrial arts, law, psychology, and social sciences, just to name a few (Carnevale, Strohl, & Melton, 2010)? In fact, more graduates of 4-year college programs in all disciplines find their first career positions in sales-related roles than in any other types of positions combined (Hayes, 2008).

Inspired by this information and a desire to prepare students for these first careers, the authors of “The Role of Self-Efficacy in Sales Education” from Journal of Marketing Education explored how sales educators can help students build the self-efficacy needed to succeed in sales. JME(D)_72ppiRGB_powerpointSelf-efficacy, one’s perception about his/her ability to succeed in a given task (Bandura, 1977), impacts ultimate performance (Barling and Beattie, 1983). Thus, it is essential that sales educators prepare students with the confidence to “hit the ground running.”

Findings show that in-class activities and hands-on projects are great for building knowledge and skills, but actual interaction with professionals (shadowing, interviews, selling to a salesperson, etc.) and student competitions build confidence in using one’s skills. Sales educators are encouraged to use these and other professional experiential activities to build sales self-efficacy, a student’s belief about his/her ability to sell!

Authors Peter Knight, Claudia C. Mich, and Michael T. Manion invite you to further explore “The Role of Self-Efficacy in Sales Education.”

 

Designing a Course to Teach Social Media Communication

businessman-in-the-office-1-1287061-mMcKinsey Global Institute analyzed 4,200 companies in 2012 and found that by adopting social technologies internally, communication and collaboration could be improved thus increasing the productivity of interaction workers by 20 to 25 percent. As a result, business schools are beginning to offer courses on the use of social media outside of marketing. But how can the use of social media for internal communication in an organization be effectively taught to business students? Amy Young and Mary D. Hinesly discuss in their article “Social Media Use to Enhance Internal Communication: Course Design for Business Students” from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly.

Organizations are increasingly using social media to improve their internal communication. When BPCQ.inddsuccessfully implemented, such initiatives can have a dramatic impact on internal efficiency, team collaboration, innovation, organizational alignment, and cultural transformation. This article describes a course offered by the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, on the use of social media for internal business communication that can be modified for Bachelor of Business Administration or Master of Business Administration students. The authors describe the pedagogy behind the course design, provide a course description, and discuss social media/communication consulting projects conducted in the class.

Click here to read “Social Media Use to Enhance Internal Communication: Course Design for Business Students” from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly. Want to know about all the latest news and research from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!