JSCAN: Call for Managing Editor

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Call for applications for JSCAN Managing Editor position

The Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation (JSCAN) is the official journal of the International Association for Contract and Commercial Management. The journal, now in its third year, publishes research and theory about practices that challenge the status quo in strategic contracting and negotiations.

The Editors are looking for a Managing Editor to assist with the running of the journal, and the full call for Managing Editor is available here.

We expect the role to be approximately 5-10 hours a week and to be geographically independent. An editorial remuneration is offered.

Expressions of interest are invited by June 12, 2017. Those interested in making an application should send a brief CV and cover email to Miriam Hodge: Miriam.Hodge@sagepub.co.uk. A more detailed role description is available on request.

Explaining the Recent Decline of Retirement Plans

13855821495_9962de1bf2_z[We’re pleased to welcome Teresa Ghilarducci of The New School for Social Research. Teresa published an article in ILR Review, entitled “Explaining the Decline in the Offer Rate of Employer Retirement Plans between 2003 and 2012” with co-author Joelle Saad-Lessler of The New School for Social Research.]

This study is the first to focus on how changes in worker bargaining power explains the national decline in employers offering retirement account plans to their employees. The study finds that, as expected, the declining bargaining power of workers is the main reason employers are less likely to offer their workers access to retirement plans. This finding should initiate a discussion about the responsibility of employers to help workers save for retirement in a system where Americans are expected to save in private accounts.

The abstract for the paper:ILR_72ppiRGB_powerpoint

Workplace retirement plans (deferred compensation plans [DCs] and deferred benefit plans [DBs]) help workers save for retirement conveniently, consistently, and automatically. But the percentage of firms offering retirement accounts is steadily declining. Between 2001 to 2003 and 2010 to 2012, the retirement plan offer rate of firms dropped from 63 to 55%. The drop is driven by a decline in both DCs and DBs. Using a probit model and an Oaxaca–Blinder threefold decomposition technique applied to data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) for 2001 to 2003 and 2010 to 2012, and using longitudinal analysis of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) 2008 panel waves 3 and 11, the authors find that the labor-contracting environment dominates individual- and firm-level variables in explaining whether employers offer a retirement account to their workers. Therefore, attempts to raise retirement account offer rates must address the decline in workers’ bargaining power and the changes in norms relating to provision of benefits. This study contributes to the important discussion about trends in DC and DB coverage and the decline in retirement security.

You can read Explaining the Decline in the Offer Rate of Employer Retirement Plans between 2003 and 2012 from ILR Review free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from ILR ReviewClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Retire image attributed to American Advisors Group (CC).
Find their homepage here.

Teresa GhilarducciTeresa Ghilarducci is an economist, author, and labor economist, and retirement security expert. Her widely circulated New York Times op-ed “Our Ridiculous Approach to Retirement” brought attention to her fresh and comprehensive critique of the America way of provisioning for retirement. Her book, When I’m 64: The Plot Against Pensions and the Plan to Save Them, presents her cutting-edge policy recommendations for restructuring the United States’ deteriorating retirement income security system. Her book Labor’s Capital: The Economics and Politics of Employer Pensions won an Association of American Publishers award in 1992. For the past five years, she has served as a court appointed trustee of the $50 billion retiree health care fund for ford, GM, and Chrysler retirees. Before coming The New School she was a professor at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Ghilarducci was the 2006–08 Wurf Fellow at Harvard Law School; her research has been funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, U.S. Department of Labor, Ford Foundation, and Retirement Research Foundation.

Joelle Saad-Lessler

Joelle Saad-Lessler is an economist with extensive experience in econometric modeling, statistical programming, and data analysis. She completed her PhD at Columbia University, and worked as an assistant professor of economics at Long Island University for eight years. Her research work is predominantly applied in nature, with a focus on the economics of immigration. Her publications span a range of issues, from the impact of immigration on local wages, to the economics of international child labor, and the economic impact of global warming.

Celebrating the launch of JSCAN – the Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiations!

JSCAN image 3On the 16th of June, we celebrated the launch of the Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiations (JSCAN) the official journal of the International Association for Contract and Commercial Management (IACCM). The SAGE editorial team joined members of the IACCM and the JSCAN editorial team at the Hurlingham Club in London to mark the publication of the journal’s inaugural issue in style.

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JSCAN co-Editor Tyrone S. Pistis

The event was held in conjunction with the IACCM Europe forum, the IACCM’s annual European meeting, and conference delegates were invited to attend the launch party. With summer arriving in London, it was the perfect evening for an outdoor celebration, with a barbeque buffet, music, speeches and drinks. Tim Cummins, CEO of IACCM, welcomed everyone, introduced the journal, and talked about JSCAN Editor Tyrone S. Pistis’s initial journal idea and the collaboration with SAGE. Tyrone in turn spoke about the background for the journal, and its aims and scope, and Caroline Lock, Publisher at SAGE, talked warmly of the collaboration with IACCM, a highlight of SAGE 50th anniversary celebrations.

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IACCM CEO Tim Cummins and SAGE Publisher Caroline Lock

The aims of JSCAN is to provide an outlet for research and theory about practices that challenge the status quo in strategic contracting and negotiations, and the commercial implementation of business strategy and policy. The journal will also address the impact of contracting and negotiations on trust and ethics in business. JSCAN is open for submissions, and details of the call for papers can be found here.

Submit Your Research to Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation

jscanWe are pleased to announce a new journal launching in spring 2015, Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation, the official journal of the International Association for Contract and Commercial Management (IACCM).

Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation is an international refereed journal publishing research and theory about practices that challenge the status quo in strategic contracting and negotiations.

Editors:

Usha C. V. Haley, West Virginia University, USA
Tyrone S. Pitsis, Newcastle University, UK; The University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
David M. Van Slyke, Syracuse University, USA

The journal welcomes submissions concerning theory, research and the practice of strategic contracting and negotiation. Multidisciplinary in nature, Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation welcomes articles from a wide range of disciplines. Possible submissions include articles on the following:

  • Papers that speak to the complexity of relational contracting
  • Papers that provide insights into performance based contracts
  • Papers that advance our understanding of contracting under complexity and ambiguity

Papers that explore the practices of negotiation as an ongoing process (not just something that happened until a contract is signed)

As a journal of the IACCM your work will also be translated into an executive summary for 8,000 of its members: giving you the opportunity for creating impact.
For more information on submitting to Journal of Strategic Contracting and Negotiation please click here.

Book Review: Informal Labor, Formal Politics, and Dignified Discontent in India

51+jLLjZIfLInformal Labor, Formal Politics, and Dignified Discontent in India. By Rina Agarwala. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. 264 pp. ISBN 978-1-107-66308-4, $29.99 (Paperback).

Looking for a good read for the long weekend? Akshay Mangla of Harvard Business School recently reviewed “Informal Labor, Formal Politics, and Dignified Discontent in India” in ILR Review.

Informal workers, unprotected by official labor law, make up a majority of the labor force in most developing countries. In addition to performing agricultural labor, informal workers construct roads, clean homes, staff kitchens, and knit clothing. Notwithstanding their centrality to the ILR_72ppiRGB_powerpointeconomy, scholarship on the organization and politics of informal workers remains sparse. We know far too little about the work conditions they experience, how they understand their rights, and not least of all, the strategies by which they organize and engage in formal politics. As with much of the informal economy, informal workers are largely treated as a residual category, one whose import is expected to diminish with economic and political modernization. While much recent scholarship documents the resilience of the informal economy in both developing and rich countries, few studies have investigated whether and how informal workers mobilize as a class and demand their rights. If anything, informality is thought to preclude workers from engaging in collective action given the dispersed and insecure nature of informal employment.

Informal Labor, Formal Politics, and Dignified Discontent in India offers a fascinating account of how informal workers in India have organized themselves to make collective demands on the state. India provides a rich and important context in which to study informal labor. More than 90% of the Indian labor force is engaged in informal work. Moreover, India’s diverse federal democracy offers considerable variation for analyzing the conditions under which informal workers successfully organize themselves. Agarwala exploits this variation effectively to examine informal worker organizations across two sectors, the construction industry and the bidi (hand-rolled cigarette) industry, and analyzes how successful they are across three Indian states. The study can be divided broadly into two parts: 1) it examines the organizational demands and strategies of India’s informal workers, and 2) it analyzes the political conditions that enable or constrain informal workers’ organizations from achieving their objectives. The research design allows Agarwala to analyze both industry- and state-level factors that could potentially shape the organizational strategies and effectiveness of informal workers’ organizations.

Click here to read the rest of the review from ILR Review! Want to know about all the latest research and reviews like this from ILR Review? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Book Review: Leadership Talk: A Discourse Approach to Leader Emergence

51EybSBEYhLNeed last minute shopping ideas? Can’t go wrong with a good book!

Walker, R., & Aritz, J. (2014). Leadership talk: A discourse approach to leader emergence. New York, NY: Business Expert Press. 150 pp. $43.95 paperback, $19.99 digital.

The review by Sky Marsen of the University of Southern California is published in the January 2015 issue of International Journal of Business Communication.

From the review:

Leadership is increasingly becoming one of the most valued concepts in contemporary society—one that is theorized, discussed, and deconstructed in BPCQ/IJBC3.inddmany fields, ranging from academic monographs to popular media articles. In some contexts, such as many Western individualistic societies, leadership is equated with personal charisma and power. In other contexts, leadership may be viewed as a mode of behavior that can foster ethical or collectivist principles and lead to the betterment of society. Robyn Walker and Jolanta Aritz’s book, Leadership Talk: A Discourse Approach to Leader Emergence, sees leadership as a mode of communication and examines it from the perspective of language use and discourse patterns.

The work’s main tenet is that leadership—defined succinctly as the ability to influence others—emerges through communicative practice rather than personality attributes or psychological disposition. This position suggests that individuals must be attributed leadership status by their followers, and they must continually enact this status through their performance in everyday communicative activities. The authors convincingly argue that leadership is expressed in a set of problem-solving and negotiation skills that are developed through practice in specific professional and social contexts.

Click here to read the rest of the review from International Journal of Business Communication. Want to know about all the latest from International Journal of Business Communication? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Get a Better Understanding of Climate Change Issues Through Simulation

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Global warming and climate change have become hot-button issues in the past few decades. Many disagree on the long-term effects and what needs to be done to correct it, if anything at all. In their article published in Simulation and Gaming, “WORLD CLIMATE: A Role-Play Simulation of Climate Negotiations,” collaborators John Sterman, Travis Franck, Thomas Fiddaman, Andrew Jones, Stephanie McCauley, Philip Rice, Elizabeth Sawin, Lori Siegel and Juliette N. Rooney-Varga suggest that communication issues are to blame and offer up a unique solution in the form of online simulation and role playing programs.

The abstract:

Global negotiations to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have so far failed to produce an agreement. Even if negotiations succeeded, however, a binding treaty could not be ratified or implemented in many nations due to inadequate public support for emissions reductions. The scientific consensus on the reality and risks of anthropogenic climate change has never been stronger, yet public S&G_2013_C1.inddsupport for action in many nations remains weak. Policymakers, educators, the media, civic and business leaders, and citizens need tools to understand the dynamics and geopolitical implications of climate change. The WORLD CLIMATE simulation provides an interactive role-play experience through which participants explore these issues using a scientifically sound climate policy simulation model. Participants playing the roles of negotiators from major nations and stakeholders negotiate proposals to reduce GHG emissions. Participants then receive immediate feedback on the implications of their proposals for atmospheric GHG concentrations, global mean surface temperature, sea level rise, and other impacts through the C-ROADS (Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support) policy simulation model used by negotiators and policymakers. The role-play enables participants to explore the dynamics of the climate and impacts
of proposed policies using a model consistent with the best available peer-reviewed science. WORLD CLIMATE has been used successfully with students, teachers, business executives, and political leaders around the world. Here, we describe protocols for the role-play and the resources available to run it, including C-ROADS and all needed materials, all freely available at climateinteractive.org. We also present evaluations of the impact of WORLD CLIMATE with diverse groups.

Read “WORLD CLIMATE: A Role-Play Simulation of Climate Negotiations” in Simulation and Gaming for free by clicking here.

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