New Podcast: Jean Twenge on Generational Attitudes on Women in the Workplace

PWQ_72ppiRGB_powerpointRecently featured on CBS’s Sunday Morning, Jean Twenge is the author of the best-selling book Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled–and More Miserable Than Ever Before. In the latest podcast from Psychology of Women Quarterly, journal editor Mary Brabeck interviews Jean Twenge about her article on time period and generational differences in attitudes towards women’s work and family roles in the United States. Dr. Twenge collaborated on the article, “Attitudes Toward Women’s Work and Family Roles in the United States, 1976–2013,” with Kristin Donnelly, Malissa A. Clark, Samia K. Shaikh, Angela Beiler-May and Nathan T. Carter.

You can click here to download the podcast. You can also read the article for free by clicking here.

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TwengeJean M. Twenge is a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, the author of Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled—and More Miserable Than Ever Before and coauthor (with W. Keith Campbell) of The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement. Her research has appeared in Time, USA Today, The New York Times, and The Washington Post, and she has been featured on Today and Dateline and National Public Radio’s All Things Considered. She holds degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of Michigan. Dr. Twenge lives with her husband in San Diego, California.

brabeck_photoMary Brabeck is Professor of Applied Psychology and Dean Emerita of the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development. Dr. Brabeck is a fellow of APA and of AERA and her research focuses on intellectual development, professional ethics, and teacher education. She published Practicing Feminist Ethics in Psychology and Meeting at the Hyphen: Schools-Universities-Professions in Collaboration for Student Achievement and Well Being. She currently is an elected member of the Board of Governors of the New York Academy of Sciences and is the elected chair of the Board of Directors of the Council on Accrediation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). Dr. Brabeck’s awards include an honorary degree from St. Joseph University in Philadelphia, Outstanding Achievement Award from the University of Minnesota, Leadership Award from the American Psychological Association Committee on Women in Psychology, and the Kuhmerker Award from the Association for Moral Education.

Evolution of Organizations

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(Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons)

How did organizations become what they are today? Charles C. Snow of the Pennsylvania State University discusses the development of organizations throughout modern history in his scholarly essay entitled “Organizing in the Age of Competition, Cooperation, and Collaboration” from Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies.

The abstract:

JLOS_72ppiRGB_powerpointThe purpose of this article is to describe how organizations have evolved across three periods of modern economic history. These periods can be called the age of competition, age of cooperation, and age of collaboration. The major organizational forms that appeared in each of the three eras, including their capabilities and limitations, are discussed.

You can read “Organizing in the Age of Competition, Cooperation, and Collaboration” from Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research like this from Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

What Do Students Think of Social Media in the Classroom?

designer-in-action-93129-mIt may not come as much of a shock to hear that young adults go on social media the most. According to Pew Research Center’s , 87% of Facebook users are between 18 and 29. As social media has become more popular, educators have jumped on board as well. A 2013 study done by Pearson Learning Solutions and the Babson Survey Research Group found that of the 8,000 faculty surveyed, 41% used social media as a teaching tool. But just how useful do students actually find social media in the classroom? Stacy Neier and Linda Tuncay Zayer explore this topic in their article “Students’ Perceptions and Experiences of Social Media in Higher Education” from Journal of Marketing Education.

The abstract:

Recent research has discussed the opportunities associated with the use of social media tools in the classroom, but has JME(D)_72ppiRGB_powerpointnot examined the perceptions students themselves hold about its usefulness in enhancing their educational experience. This research explores students’ perceptions of social media as an effective pedagogical tool. Undergraduate students in a midsized, private university taking a marketing course were surveyed about their social media usage and preferences as well as their perceptions regarding the use of social media in higher education. Additional qualitative data collection with students probed into motivations for social media use in education as well as instructor and university perceptions. Findings reveal openness to using social media in education, uncover interactive and information motives for its use, and offer theoretical and pedagogical implications. Importantly, we offer insights into how educators can strategically incorporate social media tools into the classroom as well as how the use of social media can potentially affect students’ views of the instructor and the university.

Click here to read “Students’ Perceptions and Experiences of Social Media in Higher Education” from Journal of Marketing Education. Want to have all the latest research like this sent directly to your inbox? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

No texting, plz! :)

laptop-and-cellphone-1269437-mIt can be discouraging for instructors who, after taking the time to prepare a lesson plan, find their students texting rather than taking notes in class. Educators across all disciplines and state lines are faced with the dilemma of how to respond. Is it a sign of disrespect or simply the burgeoning of a new generational divide?

A closer look at the numbers shows that the issue isn’t limited to a few problem students. A study conducted by Barney McCoy of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln found that of the 777 students surveyed, more than 80% admitted to using their phone for non-academic related reasons during class. Undergraduates were the heaviest users, reaching for their phones an average of 11 times per school day, while graduate students came in at an average of 4 uses. Business and Professional Communication Quarterly Editor Melinda Knight discusses this issue in her editorial entitled “What to Do About Texting?”

Right before the first required oral presentation in this class, I asked everyone once again to BPCQ.inddturn phones off and give full attention to each speaker. As I was saying this, one student, whom I had previously asked to stop texting on several occasions, continued to text away until I stopped speaking all together. Usually, this kind of dramatic action will help make everyone aware of the problem, yet for the rest of the semester I had only limited success in convincing students that texting during class and especially when others were giving presentations was not professional behavior. Worse yet, I continually had to answer the same questions from students who did not hear what we had previously discussed because of texting. Perhaps the apparent lack of respect for everyone, instructor and students, is what has bothered me the most about this problem.

You can read “What to Do About Texting?” and the March issue of Business and Professional Communication Quarterly free for the next two weeks! Click here to access the editorial and here to access the Table of Contents. Like what you read? Click here to sign up for e-alerts from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly!

Does Consumer Innovativeness Influence Adoption of a New Product?

mobile-phone-1104507-mDiffusion and adoption of innovation are major issues in the discipline of consumer behavior. The emergence of new technologies and developments as well as continuous changes in preferences by consumers not only shortens the life cycle of products but creates a need for innovation in order to gain a competitive edge and gratify customers’ demands. A recent study published in Paradigm entitled “Measuring Mobile Telecom Service Innovativeness Among Youth: An Application of Domain-Specific Innovativeness Scale” was conducted to measure the mobile telecom service innovativeness for youth, generally considered the target market for mobile telecom services that then influences the adoption and diffusion of innovation for the industry. By measuring consumer innovativeness, a new paradigm is opened for marketers to comprehend innovative buying behavior that affects the acceptance or rejection of new products and services in a particular category.

Consumer innovativeness is highly acknowledged by marketers for successful diffusion of innovation with the home_coveraim to make business more profitable and competitive. The present study has been conducted to measure mobile telecom service innovativeness among youth. The constructs related to consumer behaviour such as product involvement, opinion leadership, need for uniqueness, venturesomeness and price insensitivity have been included in the study as factors influencing consumer innovativeness. Youth with existing mobile telecom services have been considered as the target population and a non-probabilistic sampling technique has been used to collect samples. Univariate and bivariate analyses have been used for making statistical inferences about population. The results of the study categorized youth as consumer innovators with significant product involvement and opinion leadership for mobile telecom services and also revealed that product involvement and price insensitivity are positively associated with mobile telecom service innovativeness. The research also offers a discussion about implications of diffusion of innovation for mobile telecom services on the basis of consumer innovativeness and related constructs.

You can read “Measuring Mobile Telecom Service Innovativeness Among Youth: An Application of Domain-Specific Innovativeness Scale” from Paradigm for free by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research like this from Paradigm? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

New Podcast! Can Mobile Tablet Menus Help Millennials Make Healthier Choices?

cqx coverIn the latest podcast from Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, author Maryam F. Yepes of Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, Switzerland discusses her recent article entitled “Mobile Tablet Menus: Attractiveness and Impact of Nutrition Labeling Formats on Millennials’ Food Choices” which compared menu selections by millennial-age respondents to test the effects of five different menu nutrition labeling formats for attractiveness, perceived influence, and actual influence on the students’ food choices using mobile tablet technology.

The podcast can be downloaded by clicking here. You can also read the article for free by clicking here and subscribe to SAGE Management podcasts on iTunes by clicking here. You can click here to sign up for e-alerts and learn about all the latest news and research from Cornell Hospitality Quarterly.

70c2977b8360d3e6fbef5f2a4b5d78deMaryam F. Yepes a professor of nutrition at Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, is also a consultant and director at Myravan, specialising in bringing nutrition and health related solutions for hospitality professionals.

Book Review: Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace

41n7oTo2jrL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Hard to believe it, but the American office we go to Monday through Friday actually has quite a history. Deborah C. Andrews of the University of Delaware recently reviewed “Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace” by Nikil Saval in Business and Professional Communication Quarterly.

Nikil Saval: Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace. New York, NY: Doubleday, 2014. 352 pp. $26.95, hardback.

From the review:

The communication required to get things done in offices, studios, and laboratories shapes and reflects the design of the spaces BPCQ.inddthemselves. Nikil Saval’s Cubed provides an evocative historical perspective on the physical and social dimensions of the U.S. workplace over the past 200 years. Hardly a “secret” history, it is a history that makes explicit changes in a space—the office—that has been more sat in than examined. Saval, an editor at n + 1, a print and digital magazine of literature, culture, and politics, does not focus directly on the impact of office design on communication. But teachers of professional writing can make good use of his book to inform their research and guide students to an awareness of how the arrangement of physical spaces affects workplace communication.

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