Labor Economics and May Day throughout the Year

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As in recent years, work and economic issues have been on the minds of citizens worldwide – and not just on May Day. Almost on a daily basis we’ve seen or read about the challenges faced by employers, employees, unions, policy makers, and governments worldwide. From debates over raising the minimum wage, to discussions of pay equity and discrimination, workplace health risk factors and health insurance, and more, labor and work concerns are affecting us all. On this week set aside to recognize the international labor movement, we are pleased to highlight key journals in Economics, Industrial Relations & Labor.

We invite you to enjoy access to the following journals through June 30th. Click here to access the trial.

NEW TO SAGE IN 2016: We are pleased to publish The American Economist, the official journal of Omicron Delta Epsilon, the International Honor Society in Economics. The American Economist publishes original research from all fields and schools of economic thought, written by young scholars and those who are teaching the next generation of economists, as well as experienced and prominent economists whose influence has shaped the discipline. We invite you to read a special collection of articles from Nobel Peace Prize winning authors here.

5 Journals to Check Out During SAGE’s Free Online Access Period!

During the month of April, SAGE is offering new and returning users free access over 1.5 million articles from over 940 SAGE journals through a free trial! Ready to start reading SAGE content? Here are a few journals and articles you can look forward to reading when you sign up for the free trial:

Journal of Management

Current Issue CoverFrom Journal of Management, you can read high impact articles on management topics like entrepreneurship, organizational theory, research methods, and business strategy and policy. Published in 2014, “Innovation and Creativity in Organizations: A State-of-the-Science Review, Prospective Commentary, and Guiding Framework” from authors Neil Anderson, Kristina Potočnik, and Jing Zhou is a great example of the kind of work you’ll find in Journal of Management. The abstract from the paper:

Creativity and innovation in any organization are vital to its successful performance. The authors review the rapidly growing body of research in this area with particular attention to the period 2002 to 2013, inclusive. Conceiving of both creativity and innovation as being integral parts of essentially the same process, we propose a new, integrative definition. We note that research into creativity has typically examined the stage of idea generation, whereas innovation studies have commonly also included the latter phase of idea implementation. The authors discuss several seminal theories of creativity and innovation and then apply a comprehensive levels-of-analysis framework to review extant research into individual, team, organizational, and multilevel innovation. Key measurement characteristics of the reviewed studies are then noted. In conclusion, we propose a guiding framework for future research comprising 11 major themes and 60 specific questions for future studies.

 

Public Personnel Management

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From Public Personnel Management, you can expect to find in-depth articles on human resource management in the public sector. With your free trial, you can read the popular article “Are We There Yet? The State of Public Human Resource Management Research” from authors Todd Jordan and R. Paul Battaglio Jr. The abstract from the paper:

Beginning in 1996, the state of Georgia embarked on a bold experiment in public management reform, embracing employment at-will (EAW) for public employees. Public human resource management (PHRM) research since the Georgia reforms has called for a greater appreciation for the link between personnel reforms and performance. This research examines whether the appeal for more exacting research has been taken up. The analysis provides an overview of research on public personnel reform, focusing on five themes identified by the literature: decentralization, performance-based pay, declassification, deregulation, and privatization. Reviewing 238 articles in 13 journals since 1996, the present effort finds a lack of empirical evidence linking personnel reforms with results. The authors conclude with several perspectives for future assessments of PHRM reform and lessons for practice.

 

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Administrative Science Quarterly

From Administrative Science Quarterly, you will find top theoretical and empirical articles on organizational studies, like the recently published article “Whitened Resumes: Race and Self-Presentation in the Labor Market” from authors Sonia K. Kang, Katherine A. DeCelles, András Tilcsik, and Sora Jun. The abstract from the paper:

Using interviews, a laboratory experiment, and a résumé audit study, we examine racial minorities’ attempts to avoid anticipated discrimination in labor markets by concealing or downplaying racial cues in job applications, a practice known as “résumé whitening.” Interviews with racial minority university students reveal that while some minority job seekers reject this practice, others view it as essential and use a variety of whitening techniques. Building on the qualitative findings, we conduct a lab study to examine how racial minority job seekers change their résumés in response to different job postings. Results show that when targeting an employer that presents itself as valuing diversity, minority job applicants engage in relatively little résumé whitening and thus submit more racially transparent résumés. Yet our audit study of how employers respond to whitened and unwhitened résumés shows that organizational diversity statements are not actually associated with reduced discrimination against unwhitened résumés. Taken together, these findings suggest a paradox: minorities may be particularly likely to experience disadvantage when they apply to ostensibly pro-diversity employers. These findings illuminate the role of racial concealment and transparency in modern labor markets and point to an important interplay between the self-presentation of employers and the self-presentation of job seekers in shaping economic inequality.

 

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Compensation & Benefits Review

From Compensation & Benefits Review, you can find comprehensive articles discussing the design, implementation, evaluation, and communication of benefits policies and programs. One popular article you can read during the free trial period is “The Future of Reward Management: From Total Reward Strategies to Smart Rewards” from author Duncan Brown. The abstract for the paper:

The author argues that the terminology and concept of “total rewards” is become increasingly meaningless and outdated in our postrecessionary economy of austerity and inequality. Its generic and unthinking application in uniform flexible benefits packages risks isolating the rewards profession into an administrative backwater. Instead he argues for a new approach that he provocatively titles “smart rewards,” following recent thinking and writing in economic and foreign policy on both sides of the Atlantic. He discerns four components of this emerging reward management approach: a simpler and clearer focus on a few core values and principles, a stronger basis in evidence and measurement, more emphasis on employee engagement through rewards and improved and more open communications and line management of reward. Brown concludes that adapting and tailoring this type of approach is much more likely to create the genuinely business-enhancing and employee-engaging reward practices in our contemporary context that reward professionals and their policies aspire to.

 

JLOS_72ppiRGB_powerpointJournal of Leadership & Organizational Studies

From Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studiesyou can read articles on all aspect of leadership and organization. Recently published, “Institutional Voids in an Emerging Economy: From Problem to Opportunity” from authors Daniel J. McCarthy and Sheila M. Puffer is a great article to read during your free trial access. The abstract for the paper:

Much has appeared in the literature about institutional voids, a component of institutional theory. Little has been written, however, about the effects of institutional voids on individuals in emerging market nations and how they might react in proactive ways, including leaving their home country problems to pursue opportunities elsewhere. This article focuses on how institutional voids can create opportunities not only for such individuals but also for the firms that they join and the national economies of their host countries. We illustrate this juxtaposition from problem to opportunity by providing background on institutional voids in Russia as well as the welcoming institutional environments experienced in the United States. We do so by presenting some early findings from a larger ongoing research project. We emphasize not only the individual successes of migrants we interviewed as they seized opportunities afforded by their substantial backgrounds but also the resulting benefits to the U.S. firms that they joined or founded, as well as to the U.S. innovation economy. As illustrations, we offer the profiles of three professionals who came from Russia around 2000. They are part of a much larger group that came from various countries of the former USSR whom we interviewed in the Silicon Valley and Boston–Cambridge innovation hubs.

SAGE Free Trial Banner

You can register for your free trial of SAGE content by clicking here. Once you sign up for the free trial, you will have free online access to all SAGE journal content until April 30th 2016. SAGE’s portfolio includes more than 940 journals spanning the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Science, Technology, and Medicine, and more than 400 are published on behalf of learned societies and institutions. Start your search today!

 

 

Watch Business & Management Videos on SAGE Video with a Free 30 Day Trial!

Video ExpertsIn honor of the recent release of the new Business & Management video collection, SAGE Video is offering a free 30 day trial for SAGE Video. The collection of business and management videos includes 184 videos and 60.8 hours of content on a variety of topics, including Business Ethics & Corporate Social Responsibility, Human Resource Management, Leadership, Marketing, Organization Studies, and Entrepreneurship. For a better look at what SAGE Video has to offer, here are two videos from the Business & Management collection:

Scott Taylor Apple Video Snip

In the video, “A Change of Leader: The Case of Apple,” Dr. Scott Taylor discusses Apple as an example of how corporations and customers respond to change in leadership. Dr. Taylor discusses the unusual research he conducted in the days following Steve Jobs’ death, in which he collected data as it was generated by the media, Apple customers, and the Apple corporation. Dr. Taylor set out to analyze his data with three objectives in mind. The first was to explore the meaning of leadership, in particular as derived from large corporations like Apple. The second objective was to explore how individuals form an emotional investment in leaders. The third objective for Dr. Taylor’s research was identifying the part charisma plays in modern leadership, particularly in terms of how leader charisma can impact and transform organizations.

Sign up for the 30 day trial here and watch the video here to learn more about what Dr. Taylor discovered through his research.

Jennifer Chatman Organizational Culture Video Snip

In the video Leveraging Organizational Culture,” Dr. Jennifer A. Chatman discusses organizational culture research, highlighting two popular debates in the field: Can culture be assessed quantitatively and qualitatively? And what is the difference between organizational culture and climate? Dr. Chatman explains why the study of organizational culture is important, pointing out that culture impacts the financial performance of organizations. Dr. Chatman goes on to discuss the case study of a senior leader with the company Genetech, who was able to bring separate franchises of the company together by implementing culture initiatives to develop a shared culture.

Sign up for the 30 day trial here and watch the video here to learn more about Dr. Chatman’s research on organizational culture.

Working for a Living – Jobs, Employment, Labor, Economics

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Today is the day in the US when we give a shout-out to all those who labor.  The first Labor Day celebration in the U.S. took place in New York City on September 5th, 1882, and in 1894 the first Monday in September was designated a national holiday to commemorate the achievements and contributions of workers.  On this day we are pleased to highlight research from journals in Economics, Industrial Relations & Labor providing key insights into the world of work.

We invite you to enjoy access to the following journals through October 31st. Click here to access the trial.

COMING IN 2016: We are pleased to begin publishing The American Economist, the official journal of Omicron Delta Epsilon, the International Honor Society in Economics. The American Economist publishes original research from all fields and schools of economic thought, written by young scholars and those who are teaching the next generation of economists, as well as experienced and prominent economists whose influence has shaped the discipline.

May Day: Research has much to say about challenges in the workplace.

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Work issues have often taken center stage this year. From debates over raising the minimum wage, to discussions of pay equity and discrimination, workplace health risk factors and health insurance, and more, labor and work concerns are on the minds of employers, employees, unions, policy makers, and governments worldwide. On this day set aside to recognize the international labor movement, we are pleased to highlight key journals in Economics, Industrial Relations & Labor.

We invite you to enjoy access to the following journals through June 30th. Click here to access the trial.

COMING IN 2016: We are pleased to begin publishing The American Economist, the official journal of Omicron Delta Epsilon, the International Honor Society in Economics. The American Economist publishes original research from all fields and schools of economic thought, written by young scholars and those who are teaching the next generation of economists, as well as experienced and prominent economists whose influence has shaped the discipline.

Sign Up for Free Trial Month for SAGE Journals!

SJ-200x120We are pleased to announce that for the entire month of April, you can sign up for free access to SAGE Journals!

SAGE Journals  is one of the largest and most powerful collections of social sciences, business, humanities, science, technical, and medical content in the world! It offers over 1.3 million scholarly articles for inquisitive minds to peruse from more than 800 journals.

Researchers, practitioners and life-long learners alike are encouraged to take advantage of this offer. Business and management titles available include:

JOM 41(3)_Covers.inddJournal of Management is committed to publishing scholarly empirical and theoretical research articles that have a high impact on the management field as a whole. The journal encourages new ideas or new perspectives on existing research. Articles cover domains such as business strategy and policy, entrepreneurship, human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational theory, and research methods.

ASQ_v60n1_Mar2015_cover.inddAdministrative Science Quarterly is a top-ranked, quarterly, peer-reviewed journal that publishes the best theoretical and empirical papers on organizational studies from dissertations and the evolving, new work of more established scholars, as well as interdisciplinary work in organizational theory, and informative book reviews.

cqx coverCornell Hospitality Quarterly publishes theoretically rich, research articles that provide timely hospitality management implications for those involved or interested in the hospitality industry. The quarterly is a leading source for the latest research findings with strategic value addressing a broad range of topics that are relevant to hospitality, travel, and tourism.

This offer is only good through the month of April. To get started, click here. Happy reading!

Preview SAGE’s Newest Business Offering: SAGE Business Researcher

This month SAGE launched a new online library product for business students and practitioners: SAGE Business Researcher. More thorough than a newspaper article and more timely than a scholarly journal, SAGE Business Researcher publishes bi-weekly reports written by experienced journalists on the most pressing issues in business and management.

The following is excerpted from the issue “Doing Business in India.”

Cultural Differences Confront Foreigners
By Madhusmita Bora

“You will always be offered at least a cup of tea”

In a country as diverse and as big as India, navigating bureaucracy, red tape and infrastructure hurdles aren’t the only challenges foreign investors and businesses face. To thrive in the country, outsiders must acquaint themselves with India’s cultural quirks.

Hospitality

Unlike in the West, getting down to business right away is not the Indian way. Indians take pride in their hospitality. In business dealings, it’s best to reciprocate the goodwill.

“You will always be offered at least a cup of tea before a discussion or a meeting takes place,” Kugelman says. “My advice is to take up the offer.”

A cup of tea often serves as the best icebreaker, he adds. Somewhere down the line you will most certainly get invited to homes of colleagues for a meal with the family; fostering such personal interaction can be key to long-lasting business relationships.

Stretchable Time

One of India’s quirks is the notion of time. The day always starts late.

Ranjini Manian—author of “Doing Business in India for Dummies”—says Indian employees are hardworking, but they don’t necessarily show up at work on time and are not efficient with time management. “You have to come to terms with India’s flexible working hours,” she says. “Unlike the West, there’s no rush or hurry to get things done. We are human ‘beings,’ not human ‘doings.’”

But, despite the late arrivals, work always gets done, Manian says.

Workplace Hierarchy

Indians maintain a strong sense of hierarchy at the workplace, just as they do at home.
The top bosses are often looked upon as father figures. Most Indian employees require hand-holding and cajoling when on the job. Emotion is a huge factor in business, Manian says.

Bosses in India are viewed more as benevolent dictators looking out for their employees and teams than as colleagues, Manian says. She says it is important for managers to set goals, remove hurdles through discussions and take an interest in employees inside and outside of work in order to get the best out of them.

Practice Patience

Most Westerners expect immediate feedback in business dealings and negotiations and find that they often get frustrated dealing with their Indian counterparts, wrote Eugene M. Makar in his book “An American’s Guide to Doing Business in India.”

“Be patient,” Makar counseled. “Traditional Indians are reluctant to say no and can be polite and courteous to a fault.”

Sign up to trial SAGE Business Researcher!