The elephant (and the donkey) in the boardroom

[The following post is re-blogged from the London School of Economics and Political Science Business Review. Click here to view the article from LSE. It is based on a paper recently published in Administrative Science Quarterly titled “The Elephant (or Donkey) in the Boardroom: How Board Political Ideology Affects CEO Pay." From LSE:]   Firms governed … Continue reading The elephant (and the donkey) in the boardroom

Albert Dunlap Style Likability: Those Who Seek Flattery Get Enemies

[The following post is re-blogged from Organizational Musings. Click here to view the original article. It is a commentary based on a recently published article in Administrative Science Quarterly entitled "Those Closest Wield the Sharpest Knife: How Ingratiation Leads to Resentment and Social Undermining of the CEO," co-authored by Gareth D. Keeves, James D. Westphal, and … Continue reading Albert Dunlap Style Likability: Those Who Seek Flattery Get Enemies

Grappa: A Radical Success Story

There was a time not too long ago when grappa, the popular Italian grape-based brandy, was considered a poor man's drink. During the 1970s, grappa's status was a sharp contrast to comparable foreign spirits, like cognac and whisky, both of which were considered higher quality alcohols. And yet, toward the end of the 1970s, perceptions of grappa … Continue reading Grappa: A Radical Success Story

Status Update: How Do Organizations Respond to a Dip in Status?

Status has the potential to return concrete benefits for organizations, but status is subject to change over time, which begs the question, what happens when the status of a business changes? In their paper, "Status-Aspirational Pricing: The 'Chivas Regal' Strategy in U.S. Higher Education, 2006-2012," published in Administrative Science Quarterly, authors Noah Askin of INSEAD and Matthew … Continue reading Status Update: How Do Organizations Respond to a Dip in Status?

Charles Snow on the Evolution of Organizations

[We're pleased to welcome Charles C. Snow of The Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Snow recently published his article entitled "Organizing in the Age of Competition, Cooperation, and Collaboration" in the November issue of  Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies.] This article describes how organizations have evolved across three periods of modern economic history. The time … Continue reading Charles Snow on the Evolution of Organizations

Evolution of Organizations

How did organizations become what they are today? Charles C. Snow of the Pennsylvania State University discusses the development of organizations throughout modern history in his scholarly essay entitled "Organizing in the Age of Competition, Cooperation, and Collaboration" from Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies. The abstract: The purpose of this article is to describe … Continue reading Evolution of Organizations

Submit Your Research on Liabilities of Newness or Smallness!

Group and Organization Management is calling for submissions that provide important conceptual and empirical insights about liabilities of newness or smallness for their upcoming Special Issue entitled "New Advantage and Liability Sources in Entrepreneurial Firms: Assessing Progress and Exploring Possibilities." The issue will be guest edited by Hans Landström of Lund University and Franz Lohrke … Continue reading Submit Your Research on Liabilities of Newness or Smallness!

Can Voicing Dissent Lead to Ostracism from a Group?

[We're pleased to welcome Johny T. Garner of Texas Christian University. Dr. Garner and Debra L. Iba, also of Texas Christian University, recently collaborated on the article "Changes in Eye Contact and Attraction Scores Relative to Ostracism and Dissent" from Small Group Research.] Playing the devil’s advocate may be a sound approach for group and team … Continue reading Can Voicing Dissent Lead to Ostracism from a Group?

Book Review: Women and Executive Office: Pathways and Performance

Looking for a good read for the last weekend of summer? Melody Rose , ed.: Women and Executive Office: Pathways and Performance. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2012. 300 pp. $65.00, cloth. Read the review by Hannah Riley Bowles of Harvard University, published in the OnlineFirst section of Administrative Science Quarterly: Women and Executive Office is … Continue reading Book Review: Women and Executive Office: Pathways and Performance

Are Corporations Really as Green as They Say They Are?

More and more, consumers are demanding "green" products. In response, many corporations are developing and marketing merchandise billed as environmentally friendly. But are these corporations choosing to ignore any negative ramifications these products may actually have? Organization and Environment Guest Editor Frances Bowen and Editor J. Alberto Aragon-Correa discuss in their editorial "Greenwashing in Corporate … Continue reading Are Corporations Really as Green as They Say They Are?