Call for Papers: ILR Review

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This is your last week to submit to ILR Review‘s special issue call for papers: Conflict and its resolution in the changing world of work.

Click here to view the complete submission guidelines.

ILR Review publishes research on important issues—globalization, capital and labor mobility, inequality, wage setting, unemployment, labor market dynamics, international migration, work organization and technology, human resource management and personnel economics, demographic and ethnic differences in labor markets, workplace conflicts, alternative forms of representation, and labor regulation.

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Call for Papers: Business & Society’s Special Issues

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Business & Society is currently accepting manuscripts for two special issues.

Please click here for details on how to submit to “Modern slavery in business.”

Please click here for details on how to submit to “Corporations, capitalism and society.”

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Call for Papers: Organization & Environment

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Organization & Environment is currently accepting manuscripts for an upcoming special issue on the topic: Financial Markets and the Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy.

Please click the picture above or here to view additional guidelines for submitting.

You can also sign up to receive email alerts for Organization & Environment through the homepage!

Call for Papers: Social Marketing Quarterly

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Social Marketing Quarterly is now accepting manuscripts on the special issue topic: Social Marketing for Policy, Systems, and Environmental Change.

Please click on the picture above or here to view the additional guidelines for submitting.

Don’t forget to sign up for email alerts on the SMQ homepage!

 

 

Call for Papers: Financial Markets and the Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy

                                                          Call for Papers
OrO&E_Mar_2013_vol26_no1_72ppiRGB_powerpoint.jpgganization & Environment- Special Issue
Financial Markets and the Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy

Submissions Due: April 28, 2017

Guest Editors
Céline Louche, Audencia Business School
Timo Busch, University of Hamburg
Patricia Crifo, University Paris X, Ecole Polytechnique
Alfred Marcus, Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota

 

This special issue of Organization & Environment seeks to advance an emerging field of research on the financial sector and the transition to a low-carbon economy.

The COP 21 in November 2015 in Paris has intensified the reciprocal influences between the financial world and issues around climate change. Even the 2°C threshold has been discussed, and it is now acknowledged that “efforts [should be pursued] to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels” (UNFCCC, 2015). One of the main efforts consists in a cumulative investment of $53 trillion in energy supply and energy efficiency over the period from 2014 to 2035 (International Energy Agency, 2014). This consists not only in a shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy investments but also in much more investments in energy efficiency.

If the objectives in terms of carbon emissions and technologies deployment to keep the global average rise in temperature below 2°C are well defined (International Energy Agency, 2014; Meinshausen et al., 2009)—even if some space remains for alternative scenarios regarding specific technologies like Nuclear or Carbon Capture and Storage—the process to get there is not yet clear.

Governments can stimulate these changes notably through regulations. However, governmental actions might represent a long and cumbersome process. One may also question the feasibility to see widespread and significant actions from policy makers, which might not be enough to meet the ambitious climate objectives. If strong climate change–related regulatory actions seems to be emerging, investors already face substantial financial risks to see their assets become stranded in the context of a transition to a low-carbon economy (Ansar, Caldecott, & Tilbury, 2013; Leaton, 2013). This already calls for new ways of integrating climate change–related financial risk for investors.

If immediate and effective action cannot be expected to come from policy makers, financial markets could step in and play a significant role in the transition to a low-carbon economy. Indeed, they have the ability to massively redirect capital toward players that positively contribute to a climate-resilient economy, be it through dedicated financial instruments or the allocation choices investors make. Many indicators show that there is already a strong interaction between financial markets and the issues around climate change. Voluntary initiatives have emerged from the financial sector, like the Montreal Pledge or the Portfolio Decarbonization Coalition. New institutions addressing the need for climate-related data have emerged like CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project) and divestment or divest/invest campaigns such as the Fossil Free Campaign lead by 350.org. Financial services providers are also starting to handle the question by designing so-called “low-carbon” or “carbon-efficient” financial products. The regulatory body is also acknowledging the potential role of the financial market. As an illustration, in May 2015, France passed a new law—the French legislation on climate reporting for investors1—requiring mandatory ESG and climate policy reporting to all asset owners on a “comply or explain” basis. Another example is the Financial Stability Board’s Climate Disclosure Taskforce founded by Michael Bloomberg, whose objective is to give recommendations on what and how information should be disclosed by companies to better inform investors, lenders, and insurers about climate-related financial risk (Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures, 2016).

With or without regulation, the financial markets will play a crucial role in the transition toward the low-carbon society of the future. In addition to disclosure and portfolio adjustment issues, the financial sector can drive all other sectors’ transitions by discriminating the access to funding in the banking, insurance, and capital markets as a function of firms’ sustainability performance. However, the lack of research in this area is prevalent and many questions remain to be explored. Given the urgency of the climate change problem, further contributions in this area are both timely and needed.

Despite many initiatives to assess the performance of corporates regarding climate change, it appears that it is still extremely difficult to assess the contribution of a financial portfolio or an investment strategy to the energy transition. The indicators available to measure the alignment of the financial sector with those needs are far from clear and harmonized. Some work has already been done on the potential roles the financial sector can play for sustainability (Busch, Bauer, & Orlitzky, 2015) and on the ability of a given investment strategy to “hedge against climate risk” based on lower scopes 1 and 2 carbon intensity (Andersson, Bolton, & Samama, 2014; Schoenmaker & van Tilburg, 2016). Also, there is very little research on the potential contribution of financing streams to climate change mitigation and the transition to a low-carbon economy.

This Special Issue therefore addresses the variety of ways in which financial markets are already paving this way ahead and could or should do in future. Contributions to the Special Issue may cover (but are not limited to) the following research questions:

  • Which are the key stakeholders in the financial industry`s value chain for fostering a low-carbon economy? What are their barriers/motivations for accelerated action?
  • What is the potential leverage of different asset classes for financing of the energy transition?
  • What is the impact of current low-carbon investment practices regarding their contribution to climate change mitigation? Which challenges remain?
  • Which new institutions are required/likely to emerge for fostering the energy transition through financial markets?
  • What is the capacity of nonregularity initiatives like CDP or divesting movement in influencing the financial markets to engage in the transition to a low-carbon economy?
  • What is the financial relevance of climate effective investment strategies? Can current assessment tools fully capture related risks?
  • Are long-term climate goals coherent with short-term and/or long-term financial strategies?
  • What are the main drivers for low-carbon strategies in financial markets: regulatory pressure, underestimated risks, underestimated opportunities, and/or new social movements?
  • What are emerging practices in low-carbon finance, including the suitability and inclusivity of methodologies, tools, and metrics? What theories are emerging from those emerging practices?
  • What are the behavioral impediments of investors, asset managers, investor advisers, and other financial market actors to the development and adoption of low-carbon investment practices?
  • What are the enabling and hindering factors influencing financial institutions’ capacity to change and adapt their portfolio allocations, as well as their internal decision processes leading to pricing and capital access choices related to clients’ environmental performance?
  • Authors should submit their full manuscripts through ScholarOne Manuscripts by April 28, 2017, through http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/oe
  • Be sure to specify in the cover letter document that the manuscript is for the special issue on “Financial Markets and the Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy.”
  • Manuscripts should be prepared following the Organization & Environment author guidelines, available at http://oae.sagepub.com/
  • After an initial screening by the guest editors, all articles will be subject to double-blind peer reviewing by a minimum of two anonymous referees and editorial process in accordance with the policies of Organization & Environment.
  • Authors who are invited to revise and resubmit their papers will be invited for a manuscript development workshop (expected date and location: Fall 2017, Paris). Acceptance for presentation at the workshop does not guarantee acceptance of the paper for publication in Organization & Environment.

Please click here to view this in full-text format, along with references.

Call for Papers: Compensation & Benefits Review!

PenCompensation & Benefits Reivew is currently accepting submissions for manuscripts that discuss the design, implementation, evaluation and communication of compensation and benefits policies and programs. The journal supports human resources and compensation and benefits specialists and academic experts with up-to-date analyses and information on salary and wage trends, labor markets, pay plans, incentive compensation, legal compliance, retirement programs, and health care benefits. Do you have a manuscript that would fit well in Compensation & Benefits ReviewClick here to read more about the journal’s submission guidelines, and click here to submit your manuscript!

To highlight the kind of content Compensation & Benefits Review publishes, here’s the abstract from a recent paper published in the journal from author John G. Kilgour, entitled “Unemployment Insurance and the Great Recession”:

The Unemployment Insurance system of the United States is a federal-state Current Issue Coverpartnership. It responded well to the usual frictional unemployment and to the several recessions since its creation in 1935. The recent Great Recession beginning 2008, however, was its most severe test. Numerous extended-benefit programs were called upon to aid the large number of unemployed men and women who had exhausted their benefits. This article examines the performance of the Unemployment Insurance program during that test with emphasis on coverage, benefits, funding, the Unemployment Trust Fund and the several Extended Benefit programs. In addition to the entire United States system, it focuses on the experience of the five largest states: California, Florida, Illinois, New York and Texas as a sample of the whole.

You can read “Unemployment Insurance and the Great Recession” from Compensation & Benefits Review free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to stay current on all of the latest research published by Compensation & Benefits ReviewClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

The American Economist is Now Accepting Submissions!

AEX_72ppiRGB_powerpointYou can now submit electronically to The American Economist through SAGE Track!

As an official publication of Omicron Delta Epsilon, The International Honor Society in Economics, The American Economist strives to contribute to the ongoing dialog and academic debates within the economics discipline by publishing original research and review articles from all fields and schools of economic thought. Published twice a year in the Spring and the Fall, the journal has honored academic achievement in economics for more than fifty years.

The American Economist specifically encourages submissions from young scholars and those who are teaching the next generation of economists, and will continue to publish papers from experienced and prominent economists whose influence has shaped the discipline.

Manuscript Guidelines

The paper should include five keywords and an abstract of about 100 words, which will be used on the web to describe the article. Articles that have already been published elsewhere cannot be considered. All submissions are single-blind reviewed. Articles regarding all areas of economics and its related fields are appropriate for submission. Submitted articles should not exceed twenty-five pages in length.

  1. A title page should include article’s title and the author’s name and affiliation. Address details should be brief, including telephone number and e-mail.
  2. The text of the article should include section headings (designated by Roman numerals—I, II, III. . .), and subsection headings (Arabic numbers—1,2,3. . .). References to sources should be in the following form: (Jones 2003, 12–16).
  3. Please do not use any footnotes, rather put all notes immediately following your article. Numbering should be done using the standard Arabic number system (1,2,3, etc.).
  4. Please do not use any handwritten or typed figures and equations. All equations should be computer generated, and alike in proportion. The authors are responsible for providing copies of their charts, graphs, and tables and have them numbered consecutively in the text in Arabic numerals and also provided on separate sheets.
  5. References should follow the Notes section at the end of the article.
  6. Bibliographic citations should follow ASA style guidelines.
  7. The American Economist holds the copyright to all its published articles.

You can submit now by clicking here!

Make sure to watch for more from The American Economist in 2016!