Visit SAGE @ AOM 2018!

2018 ThemeThis week kicks off of the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management in Chicago! This year SAGE is proud to sponsor awards and papers for the following AOM divisions:

  • Gender and Diversity in Organizations (GDO)
  • Management Education and Development (MED)
  • Organizational Behavior (OB)
  • Research Methods (RMD)
  • Entrepreneurship (ENT)
  • Organization and the Natural Environment (ONE)
  • Organization Development and Change (ODC)

SAGE will be answering publishing inquiries and displaying top-tier management journals books and online products at booth #306. Come by and visit!

Join SAGE at AOM 2018 to Provide Your Feedback!

2018 ThemeThe Academy of Management 2018 Annual Meeting is going on now in Chicago!

If you’re attending AOM, don’t forget to stop by SAGE’s booths, where we’ll have the latest scholarly research from  Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Management, Organization StudiesFamily Business Review, Human Relations and other top-tier SAGE journals, as well as plenty of friendly faces willing to answer all your publishing inquiries. So come visit booth #306!

Whether or not you’ll be able to attend this year’s Academy of Management Annual Meeting, please feel free to peruse the latest from SAGE’s management and business journals represented at AOM:

ASQ_v59n3_Sept2014_cover.inddAdministrative Science Quarterly This top-tier journal regularly publishes the best theoretical and empirical papers based on dissertations and on the evolving and new work of more established scholars, as well as interdisciplinary work in organizational theory, and informative book reviews.

 

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Business & Society
In this fast-growing, ever-changing, and always challenging field of study, BAS is the only peer-reviewed scholarly journal devoted entirely to research, discussion, and analysis on the relationship between business and society.

 

fbra_31_2.coverFamily Business Review provides a scholarly platform devoted exclusively to exploration of the dynamics of family-controlled enterprise, including firms ranging in size from the very large to the relatively small. FBR is focused not only the entrepreneurial founding generation, but also on family enterprises in the 2nd and 3rd generation and beyond, including some of the world’s oldest companies.


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publishes a broad range of articles, including data-based research articles, research review reports, evaluation studies, action research reports, and critiques of research. In addition, GOM brings you articles examining a wide range of topics in organizations from an international and cross-cultural perspective.

Human Relations publishes the highest quality original research to advance our understanding of social relationships at and around work. Human Relations encourages strong empirical contributions that develop and extend theory as well as more conceptual papers that integrate, critique and expand existing theory.

 

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The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science JABS is continually breaking ground in its exploration of group dynamics, organization development, and social change, providing scholars the best in research, theory, and methodology, while also informing professionals and their clients.

 

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Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies produces high-quality, peer-reviewed research articles on leadership and organizational studies, focusing in particular on the intersection of these two areas of study.

 

JOM_44.1_72ppiRGB_powerpointJournal of Management is committed to publishing scholarly empirical and theoretical research articles that have a high impact on the management field as a whole and cover such field as business strategy and policy, entrepreneurship, human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational theory, and research methods.

JME_72ppiRGB_powerpointJournal of Management Education is dedicated to enhancing teaching and learning in the management and organizational disciplines. JME’s published articles reflect changes and developments in the conceptualization, organization, and practice of management education.

 

JMI_72ppiRGB_powerpointJournal of Management Inquiry is a leading journal for scholars and professionals in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and human resources. JMI explores ideas and builds knowledge in management theory and practice, with a focus on creative, nontraditional research, as well as, key controversies in the field.

Management Learning, the ‘Journal for Critical, Reflexive Scholarship on Organisation and Learning’, publishes original theoretical, empirical and exploratory articles on learning and knowing in management and organizations. Now in its fifth decade of publication, Management Learning continues to provide a unique forum for critical inquiry, innovative ideas and dialogue.

07ORM13_Covers.inddOrganizational Research Methods brings relevant methodological developments to a wide range of researchers in organizational and management studies and promotes a more effective understanding of current and new methodologies and their application in organizational settings.

Organization Studies publishes top quality theoretical and empirical research which promotes the understanding of organizations, organizing and the organized in and between societies. OS is a multidisciplinary journal with global reach, rooted in the social sciences, comparative in outlook and open to paradigmatic plurality. It is included in the Financial Times Top 50 journals list.

Organization is a peer-reviewed journal whose principal aim is to foster dialogue and innovation in studies of organization. The journal addresses a broad spectrum of issues, and a wide range of perspectives, as the foundation for a ‘neo-disciplinary’ organization studies.

Strategic Organization (SO) is devoted to publishing high-quality, peer-reviewed, discipline-grounded conceptual and empirical research of interest to researchers, teachers, students, and practitioners of strategic management and organization.

 

SAGE @AOM 2018!

2018 ThemeToday is the first day of the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management in Chicago, Illinois. This year’s theme is Improving Lives. In introducing the theme, Jacqueline A-M. Coyle-Shapiro, Academy of Management Vice President and Program Chair, had this to say:

The 2018 Theme asks the question: How can organizations contribute to the betterment of society through elevating the health and well-being of those who live in it? What role can organizations play in positively affecting the physical, psychological, social, and financial health of individuals, groups, communities, countries, regions, or global society?

Organizations are integral to, and have an interdependent relationship with, society. As such, they affect whether societies realize their members’ health (“complete physical, mental and social well-being,” WHO 1946) and overall wellbeing (“being happy, healthy and prosperous,” Merriam-Webster). However, the role of organizations and the responsibility for improving lives is unclear, as is the extent to which their efforts have been successful.

The Theme will explore such issues as whether (and why) organizations have a responsibility for improving the lives of individuals in society. Do organizations have an obligation to “give back”? Are there benefits for organizations who seek to improve lives as a strategic opportunity? Could—and should—organizations play more of a role in the overall health and well-being of a society? What does it take to achieve a coordinated and sustained effort from organizations to address the grand challenges of improving a society’s physical, psychological, social, and financial health? How can health and well-being become part of the conversation in upper echelons of organizations? What types of leadership approaches will engage people in making positive differences in their lives, on both large and small scales? If organizational purpose is to ensure that lives are better, what should organizations do differently?

A number of recent trends have created unique opportunities for organizations to have a positive impact. Aging, the rise of mental health issues, diversity in communities, financial insecurity, and the role of technology in facilitating constant connectivity have created challenges that organizations may be in an ideal place to address. What organizational solutions responding to these current trends are having a positive impact on the health and well-being of those affected? Under what conditions do organizational solutions transform the impact of current trends into positive effects for health and well-being of those in their local and global communities? We seek to showcase work that informs these issues. Diverse forms of research are pertinent, some examples of which include:

• What organizations are doing to ensure that digital technology/robotics positively impacts the health and well-being of employees and better serve the health and well-being of individuals, communities, and society.
• What organizations are doing to positively impact the health and well-being of an aging workforce.
• What organizational actions are providing a basis for employees with mental/physical health concerns to flourish.
• What organizations are doing to contribute to a more inclusive society and the health and well-being of diverse communities.
• What solutions organizations (individually or collectively) offer to ensure the health of the planet and, thereby, improve societal health and well-being.
• What organizations are doing to encourage and sustain financial well-being, both for their employees and for those impacted by their operations.

There is also rising inequality. Our society comprises “haves” and “have nots,” and increasing segments of society are disenfranchised as a result of prejudice, poverty, conflict, and disasters. What role can organizations have in improving the lives of vulnerable populations? What would the implications be for the care of vulnerable people? How can different types of organizations measure their impact on the health and well-being of a society’s most vulnerable groups, such as:

• the unemployed
• the working poor
• immigrants
• refugees and other displaced persons
• those living in poverty?

Pause for a moment and imagine what is and what would be possible if we seriously considered the involvement of organizations in creating a better society. Some potential questions for our diverse community to explore:

— What would it mean for organizations to seriously take into account the health and well-being of their employees and those doing life-changing work in unique contexts? What organizationally sponsored initiatives make a positive difference to the health of employees? How, when, and why does organizational performance positively impact health and well-being?
— Under what conditions do structures and processes promote societal health and well-being in the short-term and longer term? How are organizational products and services making a difference to societal health and well-being? What conditions facilitate organizations promoting human and environmental health in their supply chain and sourcing decisions? What can organizations do to enhance financial well-being in society?
— What factors facilitate and reinforce attention and action on society’s health and well-being at different levels? How do advocacy groups and Internet activism positively affect organizations’ health and well-being goals? How do organizations use their influence to advance the health agenda of public policymakers? What facilitating conditions support organizational success in improving health and well-being? How do community dynamics and nonprofit organizations shape its impact?
— How do institutional contexts facilitate the collaboration and pooling of resources to positively address societal health and well-being? What organizational capabilities facilitate the detection of societal need for help in the context of natural and human-caused disasters?
— What forms of organizational alliances/partnerships facilitate a positive impact on health and well-being? What are effective methods of knowledge transfer between organizations in the effort to cure diseases?
— How does management education positively impact the health and well-being of students and contribute to improving the lives of vulnerable groups in society? What role should management education play in promoting the health of the planet and the lives of its people?

As we prepare for the 2018 Annual Meeting in Chicago, I hope that you will think creatively, broadly, and provocatively about Improving Lives from many different perspectives.

Will you be attending AOM this year? If so, make sure to stop by SAGE booth #306! You can speak to SAGE employees about your publishing questions and learn more about SAGE’s management books and journals, including top-tier journals like Journal of ManagementAdministrative Science Quarterly, Organization Studies, and more!

Stay tuned for more information about SAGE at AOM 2018!

Interested in more information about this year’s conference? Click here to view the 2018 program.

The Effect of Linguistic Style in an MD&A on Stock Market Reaction

[We’re pleased to welcome authors Dr. Mohamed M. Tailab and Dr. Marshall J. Burak of Lincoln University. They recently published an article in International Journal of Business Communication entitled “Examining the Effect of Linguistic Style in an MD&A on Stock Market Reaction,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, they discuss this research:]

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Language as the currency of most human social processes can be converted to words. Investors and market participants attach very different connotations to the words, rely more on intuition than hard data, and react more to the verbal tone. Quantitative information contained in financial annual reports in general and in an MD&A in particular does not provide a complete picture to the investors about the expected firm value. So, the need arises to analyze the effect of narrative disclosures on market reaction as well. In addition, analyzing narrative disclosures is more easily understood than quantitative data, but at the same time it offers a different perspective. This initiated our research interests and concerns to explore in depth the impact of linguistic style in narrative disclosures on decision makers.Therefore, we decided to investigate the effect of language used in the MD&A between the speaker (management) and the listeners (investors), which in turn influences market reaction. We had hypothesized that the stock market (return and risk) has a significant response to the linguistic tone contained in the MD&A. Even though the initial hypotheses have never been proven, this study proves principles about the usefulness of an MD&A to investors.

This work expands on the understanding of the business communication literature by using an interdisciplinary approach. This approach has emerged the narrative disclosures with applied linguistic and market reaction. To this end, this paper is the first to use the partial least squares – structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) approach and contributes to the existing body of knowledge in several ways including (a) a new approach to strengths, (b) evaluation of MD&A content, (c) proof that MD&A length does not play a strong role in market reaction, and (d) findings that capital assets pricing model (CAPM) or Farm-French models are more reliable than the realized volatility.

The study indicates that the average of negative tone is greater than the average of positive words in the MD&A. This may be because the study period started in 2010, there is a possibility that the financial crisis still has an effect on the verbal tone of MD&A reports, and allows the management writers to be more conservative. One interesting observation is that the linguistic content in an MD&A was not consistent with financial performance. It can be concluded that that management most likely does not use its financial performance as a guide for writing the MD&A, or maybe it has another criterion for delivering its message to the investors.
A challenging aspect of this work is that using dictionaries built by researchers in other fields (e.g., psychology) may not be appropriate for a content analysis of financial reports. We have limited our research by neglecting the investors’ types and their preferences. So, it would be better if future researches studied the investors’ preferences, what information investors need to find in the MD&A before making their decisions.The study recommends conducting a more efficient analysis of the narrative disclosures to investigate whether management writers communicate truthful information to investors by offering relevant data about financial performance.

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The Just World Fallacy as a Challenge to the Business-As-Community Thesis

[We’re pleased to welcome author Dr. Matthew Sinnicks of Northumbria University. Dr. Sinnicks recently published an article in Business & Society entitled “The Just World Fallacy as a Challenge to the Business-As-Community Thesis,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Dr. Sinniscks reflects on the impact and innovations of this research:

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What motivated you to pursue this research?

To be honest, I stumbled upon the idea by chance. There has been some really interesting work done on ethics and the results of personality psychology over the past few decades, and I was perusing some of this literature in a quite unsystematic way when I came across a few articles on the just world fallacy. It struck me as an interesting topic, and one worthy of more philosophical reflection than it has received.
Once I got going, in addition to the fact I found the idea interesting, I was motivated by the frustrating fact that organisations, which most self-consciously regard themselves as virtuous communities, are, in fact, often furthest from that ideal, and so it seemed to me to be worth thinking about the conditions under which Aristotelian community might flourish within organisations.

Were there any specific external events—political, social, or economic—that influenced your decision to pursue this research?

Not consciously, but the fact that people who occupy positions of power and prestige often do so despite their lack of merit, and often deserve anything but deference, is a depressing lesson to be drawn from recent political events.

In what ways is your research innovative, and how do you think it will impact the field?

I hesitate to speculate on how my article will affect the field, but I would be delighted if it helped to start a conversation about the implications of the just world fallacy for human relationships both in organisations and perhaps in society generally. Furthermore, there are a number of business ethics scholars who I admire enormously, but who are far more optimistic than I am about the possibility of community within organisational life under contemporary capitalism, so I would also be delighted if my article encouraged them to address the egalitarian challenge I raise in their future work.

However, the more one reads about psychological biases, the more one becomes aware of how poor most people are at evaluating themselves, and how prone most people are to be unwarrantedly optimistic about their chances of success, so it’s important to note that these are hopes rather than expectations!

Stay up-to-date with the latest research from Business & Society and sign up for email alerts today through the homepage!

JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and the Financial Crisis of 2008

[We’re pleased to welcome author Dr. Lauren Berkshire Hearit of Hope College. Dr. Hearit recently published an article in International Journal of Business Communication entitled “JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and the Financial Crisis of 2008,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Dr. Hearit reveals the inspiration for conducting this research :]

JBC_53_2_Covers.inddIn 2010, I participated in a public policy seminar focused on the 2008 Financial Crisis that sought to understand and untangle the policies that led the global economic crisis. Starting a research interest that continues to drive me to this day, I took a deep dive in to the area, reading every new book that attempted to explain the multiple causes of the crisis. In 2013, I came across an article from The Wall Street Journal that reported that the number of banks nationwide had fallen below 7,000 – for the first time since federal regulators began tracking these numbers in 1934. This raised a number of questions: “how did these banks do this? How are they bigger than ever?” As I investigated how almost every major Wall Street bank avoided bankruptcy and increased in size, I found an integrative approach to economic policy communication was a valuable informative lens by which to study the choices made by these banks. By and large, these banks used discourse to respond to public pressure by talking publicly about their individual performance and robust strength following the financial crisis—while simultaneously using discourse privately in an effort to influence and avoid increased regulation and policy.

In my article, I use discourse analysis to examine how JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, and Wells Fargo utilized language following the Financial Crisis as a corporate resource in the same way they use personnel, capital and technology. I examine each bank’s news releases, annual reports, and annual letter to shareholders from 2009 and compare what each bank communicated to how it was covered in the mainstream news media. I ultimately argue the discourse of finance privileges the upper-class and wealthy—and is designed to minimize the role of the middle and working classes from participation in public policy decision-making. As they tailored their post-crisis discourse to focus on bank strength and stability, these major Wall Street banks utilized a terminology (e.g., mortgage-backed securities, subprime mortgages, derivatives trading, etc.) that made participation in the crisis resolution difficult, choosing language that was largely inaccessible to the public. The public largely had little choice but to accept these banks’ actions, despite the negative ramifications and impact on the global economy, as the banks crafted a discourse-based response that ignored the complexity of the discussion, policy changes, and regulation required to prevent another financial crisis.

This article seeks to spur future study on strategic financial and economic communication. Work at the intersection of public policy, economics, and strategic communication has begun to examine this area of interdisciplinary research, but scholars need to do more to bridge work from these different disciplines, using multiple methods, in order to examine the impact of economic policy communication on organizational financial performance, the economy, and crises.

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When Is There a Sustainability Case for Corporate Social Responsibility?

[We’re pleased to welcome authors Minna Halme of Aalto University School of Business, Jukka Rintamäki of City University of London, Jette Steen Knudsen of Tufts University, Leena Lankoski of Aalto University School of Business, and Mika Kuisma of Aalto University School of Business. They recently published an article in Business & Society entitled “When Is There a Sustainability Case for CSR? Pathways to Environmental and Social Performance Improvements,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Dr. Miklian reflects on the impact and innovations of this research:]

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What motivated you to pursue this research?

While this article focuses on sustainability performance, it is based on a joint research project of 12 universities which originally set out to study societal impacts of CSR. We were motivated by the fact that there is so little research on societal impacts CSR, and so much need for it among policy makers and non-governmental organizations.

What has been the most challenging aspect of conducting your research? Were there any surprising findings?

The difficulty of getting data on impacts of companies’ CSR activities took us by surprise. We had chosen a sample of companies that – based on publicly available ratings – were either leading or good CSR performers, but data on societal impacts of CSR was still scarce. And not only scarce: CSR practices, performance and impacts were often also confused with one another in the company reporting and in managers’ oral accounts. It took massive cross-checking of interview data, and public and internal document data to get the study done.

It also became strikingly evident that in the end of the day researchers as well as sustainability ratings are at the mercy of companies’ self-reported sustainability data. Databases and ratings such as the KDL, Asset4 or the like tend to be viewed as reliable data. Investors and management academics measuring corporate sustainability performance widely use these ratings as if they were drawn from “hard objective data”. In reality such data is self-reported by companies.

Aggravating the risk of mismeasurement is that these schemes are untransparent: users (researchers, investors) do not necessarily know what data exactly composes each indicator. This is paradoxical as for research purposes it is considered positive if “the performance data is from an external source” – a statement which effectively closes the door from discussion about validity problems of performance data used. Sustainability databases should make their performance measurement data more transparent so that users have a means to assess what has been measured as environmental and social performance.

In what ways is your research innovative, and how do you think it will impact the field?

We separated CSR activities (antecedents of sustainability performance) from the performance itself, and did not rely on narrow data but instead constructed performance schemes for assessing both environmental and social performance. In addition to management researchers, our team had wide sustainability performance knowledge base from natural science to social sustainability studies. We used both externally available and internal document data, interviewed companies as well as met with their stakeholders to complement and verify the data. In other words, we went beyond analysts adhering to data sets like KDL, Asset4 or TRI.
Our configurational approach makes it possible to discover that different pathways are associated with environmental and social performance (non)improvements, and that pathways to success and failure are for the most part not symmetrical, which has not been shown before with any larger dataset.

We expect that our research will encourage more informative future research on the influence of CSR policies and practices onto sustainability performance. We hope it raises the bar for more comprehensive future measurement of sustainability performance of companies, making the research in the field more useful for policy makers who seek to steer corporate performance and for company managers, who struggle to understand what kind of CSR is beneficial for improvement of sustainability performance.

Stay up-to-date with the latest research from Business & Society and sign up for email alerts today through the homepage!