Journal of Management Education’s 2016 Award-Winning Article

On behalf of the Journal of Management Education, SAGE Publishing would like to congratulate co-authors Richard J. Miller and Rosemary Maellaro, both of the University of Dallas, for winning the Fritz Roethlisberger Award for 2016 for their article, “Getting to the JME_72ppiRGB_powerpoint.jpgRoot of the Problem in Experiential Learning: Using Problem Solving and Collective Reflection to Improve Learning Outcomes,” which can be found in the April 2016 issue of JME. The award’s criteria include scholarly grounding, expected longevity, potential impact, and potential to reach across disciplines.

The article is currently free to read for a limited time.

The abstract for the article is below:

Experiential learning alone does not guarantee that students will accurately conceptualize content, or meet course outcomes in subsequent active experimentation stages. In an effort to more effectively meet learning objectives, the experiential learning cycle was modified with a unique combination of the 5 Whys root cause problem-solving tool and a collective reflection step. Applying these modifications through multiple iterations of in-class exercises, students in lean operations and leadership courses were able to move beyond treating symptoms of problems and generate more viable alternative actions for future applications of their learning. Improved grades, greater achievement of learning objectives, and positive student reactions provide evidence of the modified experiential learning cycle’s success. A generalized framework for using the modified learning cycle in other management courses is also presented.

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Announcing the Winners of JOM’s Best Paper and Scholarly Impact Award!

We are pleased to congratulate the 2016 Journal of Management Best Paper and Scholarly Current Issue CoverImpact Award winners, announced just recently at the Academy of Managment 2016 Annual Meeting.

The Scholarly Impact Award, given annually, recognizes work with a lasting impact on the academic community and beyond. Our congratulations to the following winners:

Scholarly Impact Award:
Christopher Zott, Raphel Amit, and Lorenzo Massa
“The Business Model: Recent Developments and Future Research”

Scholarly Impact Award:
Donald Lange, Peggy M. Lee, and Ye Dai
“Organizational Reputation: A Review”

Scholarly Impact Award:
Dirk Van Dierendonck
“Servant Leadership: A Review and Synthesis”

Scholarly Impact Award:
Suzanne T. Bell, Anton J. Villado, Marc A. Lukasik, Larisa Belau, Andrea L. Briggs
“Getting Specific About Demographic Diversity Variable and Team Performance Relationships: A Meta-Analysis”

Best Paper Award and Scholarly Impact Award:
Brian L. Connelly, S. Trevis Certo, R. Duane Ireland, and Christopher R. Reutzel
“Signaling Theory: A Review and Assessment”

To celebrate these award-winning papers, readers will be able to access the papers free for the next 30 days! Congratulations again to the authors from Management INK!

Award-Winning Journal of Management Education Article on Business Studios

2016 Roethlisberger Award WinnerWe are pleased to congratulate Stefan Meisiek of University of Sydney and Daved Barry of Jönköping International Business School , who received the Fritz Roethlisberger Memorial Award for 2016 with their article, “Discovering the Business Studio,” published in the February 2015 issue of Journal of Management Education. 

The Fritz Roethlisberger Memorial Award commemorates Fritz Roethlisberger’s devotion to inquiry and learning. Fritz Roethlisberger helped pioneer the Human Relations School of Management as a human-centric alternative to Taylorist management. The Human Relations School has strongly informed the recent global push towards business humanities education. The Fritz Roethlisberger Memorial Award is granted to authors judged to have contributed the best paper on teaching and learning in organizational and management sciences published in the Journal of Management Education during the previous year.

The abstract for the paper:

Over the past decade, numerous business schools have begun experimenting with studio-based inquiry, often drawing inspiration from professional studios used within art and design schools and from business and governmental studios used for problem-solving and innovation. Business school studios vary considerably in form, ranging from temporary “pop up” studios to dedicated facilities with full-time JMEstaff, with the primary purpose of educating managers in craft, art, and design-based approaches to business problems. The jury on the studio phenomenon is out—can they deliver on their educational promise? To address this question, we pull together 25 years of studio experimentation in multiple settings, visits, and observations of studios around the world and interviews with studio makers from various disciplines. We consider the question of “what is a business studio?” in some detail, conjecture about the value that studios might have for management education, provide examples of four different business studio orientations and how these might translate into practice, and highlight what we believe to be some essentials when starting and running a business studio.

You can read the award-winning article “Discovering the Business Studio” free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Journal of Management EducationClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

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The American Economist Is Now Online!

AEX_72ppiRGB_powerpointWe’re pleased to announce that The American Economist is now online with a new, special March 2016 issue! The special issue takes a look back at some of The American Economist‘s most influential articles, each with a new Editor’s Introduction. Editor-in-Chief Paul Grimes introduces the special issue:

This edition of The American Economist marks a new chapter in the history of the journal and its sponsoring organization, Omicron Delta Epsilon, The International Honor Society in Economics. For more than five decades, Omicron Delta Epsilon self-published the journal using a variety of university presses and contract printers to physically produce and distribute the journal to members of the society, individual subscribers, and libraries around the world. Its deep red cover and distinctive title wordmark became iconic symbols within the economics profession. Although the size and format of the journal evolved over time, the journal was produced only in a hardcopy format—until this issue. With Volume 61, Number 1, Spring 2016, The American Economist enters the digital age of journal publication…

Omicron Delta Epsilon recently celebrated its 100th birthday and The American Economistrecently passed the 50th anniversary of its association with the honor society. As we move past these important milestones and into the digital future, it is fitting that we take the time to look back on the journal’s valuable legacy. This issue opens with a bibliographic history of The American Economist that chronicles the journal’s path from a student-edited and student-produced annual publication into a well-respected academic journal with a global readership. The history is followed by the republication of 12 classic articles from the journal’s backfile. These curated articles were selected to provide readers with a feel of The American Economist’s rich heritage of publishing original work by some of the world’s most prominent economists. Papers by Milton Friedman, Paul Samuelson, John Kenneth Galbraith, Robert Solow, and Elinor Ostrom are included here, among others. Each article opens with a new Editor’s Introduction to set the paper and the author into its proper context.

In honor of the impressive legacy of The American Economist, we Nobels_fredspris,_medalje_-_no-nb_digifoto_20160310_00042_NB_NS_NM_10016are pleased to present a special collection of articles from the journal that we written by Nobel Peace Prize winning authors. You can read the special collection from The American Economist free for the next 30 days by clicking here.

To read the March 2016 special issue, also free for the next 30 days, click here. Want to know all about the latest research from The American Economist? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Are Academy Awards Effective Signals of Quality Films?

87th Oscars®, Governors Ball Preview

The Academy Awards is a well-established celebration of talent and achievement in the film industry. Yesterday marked the Oscars’ 88th award ceremony, a testament to the popularity of the Academy Awards, but popularity alone does not mean that the Oscars are a reliable signal of quality. We revisit the article, “Why Some Awards Are More Effective Signals of Quality Than Others: A Study of Movie Awards” published in Journal of Management by authors Gedra Gemser, Mark A.A.M. Leenders, and Nachoem M. Wijnberg, to consider how different award shows define and award quality work. The authors discuss whether the Academy Awards, a peer-selected award, is less effective in boosting film performance than expert-selected awards. In addition, the authors compare the Academy Awards with less prestigious film awards to determine whether the Oscars are viewed as a more credible cue for consumers to select movies.

The abstract:JOM 41(3)_Covers.indd

In this article, the authors develop and empirically test a conceptual framework that predicts which types of awards
have the biggest impact on the competitive performance of the award winners. The empirical setting is an industry where awards proliferate, namely, the U.S. motion picture industry. Overall, their results suggest that awards granted by a jury composed primarily of end consumers, peers, or experts each have a different effect on consumer behavior, which can be explained in terms of differences in source credibility and award salience.

You can read “Why Some Awards Are More Effective Signals of Quality Than Others: A Study of Movie Awards” from Journal of Management free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Wan to know all about the latest research from Journal of ManagementClick here to sign up for e-alerts!

*Oscars image credited to Todd Wawrychuk (CC)

Award-Winning Journal of Management Education Article on Learning-Inhibitory Introductory Textbooks

JME

Robert A. Snyder of Northern Kentucky University recently won the first Ruane National Prize for Innovation in Business Education for his article, “Let’s Burn Them All: Reflections on the Learning-Inhibitory Nature of Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior Textbooks,” which was published in the October 2014 issue of Journal of Management Education. Dr. Snyder also has a forthcoming book, The Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Leading Organizational Change, which will be released on March 12, 2016 by Taylor & Francis/Routledge.

The abstract for the award-winning article:

This essay provides evidence from the neurosciences that standard Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior textbooks may inhibit, rather than facilitate, learning of the basic concepts and the rudimentary knowledge-basis that underlie the complex skills business students should learn in subsequent coursework and that they must hone in practice as future managers. Specific introductory textbook limitations that are addressed include the following: (a) the nearly total absence of neuroscience findings that have important relevance and application to management and organizational behavior; (b) the ineffective manner in which theories are presented; (c) the use of idiosyncratic, academically derived, or simply spot-invented language; (d) the nonengaging manner in which information (generally speaking) is presented; and (e) the question of whether such textbooks are being read, much less studied. Based on my recent, joyous experience in not using such textbooks, I propose, for readers’ possible consideration, an alternative (hyperlink) practice that is (a) fully compatible with recent neuroscience research on management, learning, and information retention/retrieval and (b) likely to dramatically increase student engagement with assigned readings in Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior courses and their ability to retrieve content and apply it during class discussions.

You can read “Let’s Burn Them All: Reflections on the Learning-Inhibitory Nature of Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior Textbooks” from Journal of Management Education free for the next two weeks by clicking here. Want to know all about the latest research from Journal of Management Education? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Announcing the Winner of Public Finance Review’s Outstanding Paper Award of 2015

We’re pleased to congratulate Timothy F. Page and Karen Smith Conway, winners of the Outstanding Paper Award of 2015 from Public Finance Review! Their award-winning article entitled “The Labor Supply Effects of Taxing Social Security Benefits” appeared in the May 2015 issue of Public Finance Review.

The abstract:PFR_72ppiRGB_powerpoint

In 1983, federal and state governments began taxing the social security benefits of high-income elderly. We develop a conceptual model and use 1981–1986 Current Population Survey data to estimate the policy’s labor supply effects. Our estimates suggest that the approximate 20 percent reduction in benefits for the highest income individuals led to a two to five percentage point increase in their labor force participation. Using 2008 data, we show that failing to index the taxation thresholds for inflation, adding a second set of thresholds in 1993, and removing the earnings test in 2000 all substantially magnify the policy’s scope.

You can read this article for free for the next 30 days by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research and announcements from Public Finance Review? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!