Work Group Inclusion

[We’re pleased to welcome authors Beth G. Chung of San Diego State University, Karen H. Ehrhart of the University of Central Florida, Lynn M. Shore of Colorado State University, Amy E. Randel of San Diego State University, Michelle A. Dean of San Diego State University, and Uma Kedharnath of the University of Wisconsin–Whitewater. They recently published an article in Group and Organization Management entitled “Work Group Inclusion: Test of a Scale and Model” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, they recount the motivations and challenges of this research:]

We decided to pursue this research because of the momentum the concept of inclusion has gained in both the academic and business world. Part of this momentum was generated by a conceptual paper (Shore et al., 2011) we wrote that clearly defined the concept of inclusion in the literature. According to our conceptual paper, inclusion is feeling like you belong and are accepted for your uniqueness in a group. The conceptual paper also forwarded a theoretical model to be tested. The current paper does just that. We test a measure of inclusion that contains both uniqueness and belongingness and we test a complete model of the predictors and outcomes of work group inclusion.

One of the most challenging aspects of doing work on inclusion and diversity is that companies are sometimes weary of providing data regarding these topics. Although the information provided by our research can only help organizations improve, the tendency is to shy away from research that might reveal unbecoming information. However, with persistence and tenacity, we were able to collect the data and validate a measure that is greatly needed to practically assess inclusion in organizations. It is a short measure (10-items) that can help an organization assess whether their employees feel inclusion within their workgroups. We are able to show that these feelings of inclusion have important consequences such as improved performance, creativity, and increased helping behavior. We believe that this article will be useful to both academics and practitioners alike.

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This entry was posted in Groups, Management, Management Theory, Organizational Behavior and tagged , , , , by Cynthia Nalevanko, Senior Editor, SAGE Publishing. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cynthia Nalevanko, Senior Editor, SAGE Publishing

Founded in 1965, SAGE is the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. Known for our commitment to quality and innovation, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students across a broad range of subject areas. With over 1500 employees globally from principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC, and Melburne, our publishing program includes more than 1000 journals and over 900 books, reference works and databases a year in business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. Believing passionately that engaged scholarship lies at the heart of any healthy society and that education is intrinsically valuable, SAGE aims to be the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. This means playing a creative role in society by disseminating teaching and research on a global scale, the cornerstones of which are good, long-term relationships, a focus on our markets, and an ability to combine quality and innovation. Leading authors, editors and societies should feel that SAGE is their natural home: we believe in meeting the range of their needs, and in publishing the best of their work. We are a growing company, and our financial success comes from thinking creatively about our markets and actively responding to the needs of our customers.

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