New Scriptologies of Organization Studies

[We’re pleased to welcome author Dr. Carl Rhodes of the University of Technology Sydney. He recently published an article in Management Learning entitled “Sense-ational organization theory! Practices of democratic scriptology,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Dr. Rhodes briefly describes his research and its significance to the present:]

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I was motivated to write this paper out of a long standing concern with the somewhat restrictive textual politics that is present in the field of organization studies. As with many other sites of the social sciences, this is a politics where those of us who work in it either consciously or inadvertently feel the pressure to write our work in a disembodied fashion that imagines what we are doing is simply offering an objective account of research and/or theorising.

While this approach to academic writing has long been dominant, so have challenges to it. The paper is published in a special issue edited by Sarah Gilmore, Nancy Harding, Jenny Helin and Alison Pullen that sought to “break out of the constraints of scientific writing in order to better develop insights and understanding about management and the world of work, and how to communicate those ideas”.

My response to this call was to do a review of the use of alternative and experimental modes of writing in organization studies from the 1980s onwards, beginning when scholars like John Van Maanen claimed that our writing could free itself up to be impressionistic and fragmented, and Barbara Czarniawska was exploring organization studies as a literary genre. In conceiving of the paper my idea was to describe the alternative alternatives that had been published over past 40 years or so as well as to explore how they relate to the politics of knowledge that still marginalises forms of poetic, artistic, unruly and creative writing in favour of colder scientific genres.

To offer a way of explaining this, the paper proposes the notion of ‘scriptology’ as a counterpoint to ‘methodology’. Just as a methodology provides an explanation and justification of the methods with which research conducted, a scriptology would do the same thing for the form in which research is written. The problem is, of course, that scriptology is largely taken for granted such that the dominance of masculine-rational scientific writing is taken for granted to the level of virtual domination.

I try to consider organization studies as an aesthetic phenomenon that contains competing claims of what forms of writing ‘count’ as knowledge. This focus on aesthetics is meant to attest to a ‘democraticization’ of knowledge, to the extent that people strive to create freedoms that enable different knowledges to enter in to the realm of what makes sense to our field.

While the paper reviews a range of historical examples of non-conventional writing, it also shows that in recent years the most productive and provocative of these have come from feminine and feminist writing. This amounts to the beginning of an aesthetic revolution that channels important political contestations over the gendered character of the inscription of research. This has been done not just in the name of stylistic pluralism but by considering the relationship of writing to forms of oppression and discrimination based on sex, gender and sexuality.

The scriptologies that have been developed in this emerging tradition criticize the masculinity of dominant mode of writing. More productively they emphasize and exemplify fluidity, plurality, reflexivity, embodiment, affectivity, non-sameness, and multiplicity of identities and relations as pivotal to the possibilities of feminine writing.

My intended contribution is limited to attesting to the work of others as manifest in a range of examples of feminine and feminist scriptologies. These include, inter alia, Brigitte Biehl-Missal practice of ‘feminine creation’, Briony Lipton’s ‘creative academic fiction’, Ajnesh Prasad’s rearticulation of Donna Haraway’s ‘cyborg writing, and Janet Sayers’ ‘feminist dogwriting’ and ‘meat-writing’.

The emerging sense that this writing portends is not about justification of different research genres so as to broaden forms of expression and extend knowledge, but rather it is about shifting and destabilizing the very meaning of what we might take knowledge to be. While the article explores the development and value such non-conventional writing in organization studies, I can only conclude by saying that reading the original works would promise to be more illustrative than relying on my exegesis.

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This entry was posted in Management, Management Theory and tagged , , , , by Cynthia Nalevanko, Senior Editor, SAGE Publishing. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cynthia Nalevanko, Senior Editor, SAGE Publishing

Founded in 1965, SAGE is the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. Known for our commitment to quality and innovation, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students across a broad range of subject areas. With over 1500 employees globally from principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC, and Melburne, our publishing program includes more than 1000 journals and over 900 books, reference works and databases a year in business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. Believing passionately that engaged scholarship lies at the heart of any healthy society and that education is intrinsically valuable, SAGE aims to be the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. This means playing a creative role in society by disseminating teaching and research on a global scale, the cornerstones of which are good, long-term relationships, a focus on our markets, and an ability to combine quality and innovation. Leading authors, editors and societies should feel that SAGE is their natural home: we believe in meeting the range of their needs, and in publishing the best of their work. We are a growing company, and our financial success comes from thinking creatively about our markets and actively responding to the needs of our customers.

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