How do Quality of Teaching, Assessment and Feedback Drive Undergraduate Course Satisfaction in UK Business Schools?

univ[Dylan Sutherland of Durham University Business School, Philip Warwick of Durham University Business School, John Anderson of the University of Northern Iowa, and Mark Learmonth of Durham University Business School recently published an article in the Journal of Management Education. We are pleased to feature their article, “How do Quality of Teaching, Assessment and Feedback Drive Undergraduate Course Satisfaction in UK Business Schools? A Comparative Analysis with Non-Business School Courses using the UK National Student Survey,” and are excited to announce that the article will be free to access on our site for a limited time.  Below they reveal further insights regarding the inspiration behind the research, as well as additional information not included in the final publication.]

JME_72ppiRGB_powerpointOur research aimed to understand the most significant issues which contribute to student satisfaction. We also hoped to identify if there are any differences between students in business schools and those studying other subjects. We were motivated to look at this issue by the importance placed on student satisfaction by UK Higher Education System (many of the university and subject ranking tables place a significant weighting on student satisfaction scores).

We found that good teaching remains the most important driver of satisfaction, along with being well-organised (smooth running courses are very important to students). We also detected a noticeable tendency among business students to instrumentalism. That is, they focus on results and achieving those results, like a good job at the end of the course, rather than studying for the love of the subject. We think instrumentalism is different to adopting a strategic learning style, because of this emphasis on the end result. We finish the article by considering the implications of this work. With increasing tuition fees and the imperative of getting a good job at the end of the course, it seems likely that a wider range of students will adopt an instrumental approach in the future. Business students may be the forerunners.

 

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Lecture Hall Photo attributed to Free-Photos (CC)

This entry was posted in Education, Management, Management Theory and tagged , , , , , by Cynthia Nalevanko, Senior Editor, SAGE Publishing. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cynthia Nalevanko, Senior Editor, SAGE Publishing

Founded in 1965, SAGE is the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. Known for our commitment to quality and innovation, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students across a broad range of subject areas. With over 1500 employees globally from principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC, and Melburne, our publishing program includes more than 1000 journals and over 900 books, reference works and databases a year in business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. Believing passionately that engaged scholarship lies at the heart of any healthy society and that education is intrinsically valuable, SAGE aims to be the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. This means playing a creative role in society by disseminating teaching and research on a global scale, the cornerstones of which are good, long-term relationships, a focus on our markets, and an ability to combine quality and innovation. Leading authors, editors and societies should feel that SAGE is their natural home: we believe in meeting the range of their needs, and in publishing the best of their work. We are a growing company, and our financial success comes from thinking creatively about our markets and actively responding to the needs of our customers.

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