The Just World Fallacy as a Challenge to the Business-As-Community Thesis

[We’re pleased to welcome author Dr. Matthew Sinnicks of Northumbria University. Dr. Sinnicks recently published an article in Business & Society entitled “The Just World Fallacy as a Challenge to the Business-As-Community Thesis,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Dr. Sinniscks reflects on the impact and innovations of this research:

BAS_v50_72ppiRGB_powerpoint

What motivated you to pursue this research?

To be honest, I stumbled upon the idea by chance. There has been some really interesting work done on ethics and the results of personality psychology over the past few decades, and I was perusing some of this literature in a quite unsystematic way when I came across a few articles on the just world fallacy. It struck me as an interesting topic, and one worthy of more philosophical reflection than it has received.
Once I got going, in addition to the fact I found the idea interesting, I was motivated by the frustrating fact that organisations, which most self-consciously regard themselves as virtuous communities, are, in fact, often furthest from that ideal, and so it seemed to me to be worth thinking about the conditions under which Aristotelian community might flourish within organisations.

Were there any specific external events—political, social, or economic—that influenced your decision to pursue this research?

Not consciously, but the fact that people who occupy positions of power and prestige often do so despite their lack of merit, and often deserve anything but deference, is a depressing lesson to be drawn from recent political events.

In what ways is your research innovative, and how do you think it will impact the field?

I hesitate to speculate on how my article will affect the field, but I would be delighted if it helped to start a conversation about the implications of the just world fallacy for human relationships both in organisations and perhaps in society generally. Furthermore, there are a number of business ethics scholars who I admire enormously, but who are far more optimistic than I am about the possibility of community within organisational life under contemporary capitalism, so I would also be delighted if my article encouraged them to address the egalitarian challenge I raise in their future work.

However, the more one reads about psychological biases, the more one becomes aware of how poor most people are at evaluating themselves, and how prone most people are to be unwarrantedly optimistic about their chances of success, so it’s important to note that these are hopes rather than expectations!

Stay up-to-date with the latest research from Business & Society and sign up for email alerts today through the homepage!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s