The Impact of FSMA on Restaurants

restaurant-2623071_1920[We’re pleased to welcome author Mark Johnson of Michigan State University. He recently published an article in Cornell Hospitality Quarterly entitled “An End User Perspective: The Impact of FSMA on Restaurants,” which is currently free to read for a limited time. Below, Dr. Johnson talks about the background of this research:]

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On January 4, 2011, President Obama signed into law the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA or P.L. 111-353). This act may be the most far-reaching food safety legislation since the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act of 1938 (FDCA). FSMA aims to ensure that the U.S. food supply is safe by shifting the focus of regulation from contamination response to prevention. This legislation imposes administrative costs on the food supply chain in the U.S. by requiring additional record keeping and safety procedures.

The law created record keeping requirements for firms. These requirements are often referred to as one-up-one-down. This nickname emphasizes the fact that the act requires grocers, wholesalers, and food processors to keep track of the immediate parties that they buy food and food products from as well as the parties that they sell food and food products too. This ensures that any contamination problems in the U.S. food supply chain can quickly and efficiently be traced to its source and aid in the rapid response to foodborne illness before it becomes widespread. The Congressional Budget office (August 12, 2010) estimated that FSMA would directly cost taxpayers $1.4 Billion through federal administrative costs. However, attempts to measure the costs imposed on businesses by the legislation were largely ignored until we reported, in a previous study, that expected costs to food processors, wholesalers and grocers was approximately 10% of equity value (Johnson and Lawson 2016). This represented a market value cost of $33 Billion. This previous result encouraged me to consider that others in the food supply chain, end users, such as consumers and restaurants may bear some of these supply chain costs.

The surprising evidence from my current article indicates that restaurants lost approximately 5% of firm value. In this case of restaurants this represents approximately 7.5 billion dollars of lost value. These equity costs represent expected future cash flow and risk effects for the firms studied. These costs, 1.4+33+7.5= $42B, should be weighed against the potential benefits to consumers that the act brings. These benefits may be directly measurable in a potential drop in food borne illness cases over the next 5-10 years as the act is fully implemented.

Previous article:
The Impact of the Food Safety and Modernization Act on Firm Value,” M. Johnson and T. Lawson, Agricultural Finance Review, 2016, 76(2): 233-245.
Current article:
An End User Perspective: The Impact of FSMA on Restaurants,” M. Johnson, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, Forthcoming

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Kitchen photo attributed to StockSnap. (CC)

This entry was posted in Customer Engagement, Finance, government, Hospitality Management and tagged , , , , , , by Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, SAGE Publishing. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, SAGE Publishing

Founded in 1965, SAGE is the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. Known for our commitment to quality and innovation, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students across a broad range of subject areas. With over 1500 employees globally from principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC, and Melburne, our publishing program includes more than 1000 journals and over 900 books, reference works and databases a year in business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. Believing passionately that engaged scholarship lies at the heart of any healthy society and that education is intrinsically valuable, SAGE aims to be the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. This means playing a creative role in society by disseminating teaching and research on a global scale, the cornerstones of which are good, long-term relationships, a focus on our markets, and an ability to combine quality and innovation. Leading authors, editors and societies should feel that SAGE is their natural home: we believe in meeting the range of their needs, and in publishing the best of their work. We are a growing company, and our financial success comes from thinking creatively about our markets and actively responding to the needs of our customers.

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