Indian Entrepreneurship and Its Varied Manifestations: A Historical Perspective

5003583610_0eb2f34028_zStories have always captured the imagination of man. Be it timeless epics, like the Mahabharata and Ramayana, or more recent books, like JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series and Steve Jobs’ biography, well-told stories have the ability to capture their audience’s imagination. And while fictional stories engage readers’ imaginations, true stories can inspire readers to act. As a result, looking back at true stories and history specifically relevant to entrepreneurship can be a valuable perspective to take in the study of entrepreneurship. Unfortunately, the historical lens has been has been neglected in the past.

A recent article from Journal of Entrepreneurship entitled, “Indian Entrepreneurship through a Historical Lens: A Dialogue with Dwijendra Tripathi ,”  highlights themes of relevance to the study  of Indian entrepreneurship. The author of the article Raj K Shankar has identified five themes from a review of academic literature. The five themes are: business history and entrepreneurship, context and entrepreneurship, caste and entrepreneurship, entrepreneurship in emerging economies, and entrepreneurship research using historical methods. The author argues that research in these areas can benefit immensely when looked at through a historical lens. The article also includes views from a dialogue with noted business historian, Dwijendra Tripathi, which help bolster the arguments.

Current Issue CoverWith growing entrepreneurial accomplishments, India has gained the notice of many nations and companies around the world as a country with high entrepreneurial potential. As a result, it is important to understand and catalyze entrepreneurship, not only as a discipline of academic curiosity, but also as a field of pragmatic importance.

The abstract for the paper:

History arguably is most suited to inform entrepreneurship and its varied manifestations. It is equally well placed to address entrepreneurship’s primary challenge—longitudinal work in context. Despite repeated calls for this, it has remained a plea. Extant literature review provided five themes, which researchers can use to begin to look at entrepreneurship through a historical lens. These are: business history and entrepreneurship, context and entrepreneurship, caste and entrepreneurship, entrepreneurship in emerging economies and entrepreneurship research using historical methods. A dialogue with India’s pre-eminent business historian Dwijendra Tripathi adds perspective to the considerable potential these themes present for entrepreneurship research through a historical lens. Indian entrepreneurship provides context to this perspective and reinforces this need. Furthermore, the five themes provide research gateways for scholars in both business history and entrepreneurship.

Click here to read Indian Entrepreneurship through a Historical Lens: A Dialogue with Dwijendra Tripathi free for the next two weeks from the Journal of Entrepreneurship.

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*Meeting image attributed to Michael Cannon (CC)

 

This entry was posted in Business, Careers, Entrepreneurship and tagged , , , , , , by Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, SAGE Publishing. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, SAGE Publishing

Founded in 1965, SAGE is the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. Known for our commitment to quality and innovation, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students across a broad range of subject areas. With over 1500 employees globally from principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC, and Melburne, our publishing program includes more than 1000 journals and over 900 books, reference works and databases a year in business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. Believing passionately that engaged scholarship lies at the heart of any healthy society and that education is intrinsically valuable, SAGE aims to be the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. This means playing a creative role in society by disseminating teaching and research on a global scale, the cornerstones of which are good, long-term relationships, a focus on our markets, and an ability to combine quality and innovation. Leading authors, editors and societies should feel that SAGE is their natural home: we believe in meeting the range of their needs, and in publishing the best of their work. We are a growing company, and our financial success comes from thinking creatively about our markets and actively responding to the needs of our customers.

One thought on “Indian Entrepreneurship and Its Varied Manifestations: A Historical Perspective

  1. Pingback: My article on Management INK | Raj's Lab

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