Book Review: Bruce Kogut (ed.): The Small Worlds of Corporate Governance

indexBruce Kogut (ed.): The Small Worlds of Corporate Governance. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2012. 388 pp. $42.00, hardcover.

You can read the review by Mark S. Mizruchi of the University of Michigan, available now in the OnlineFirst section of Administrative Science Quarterly.

From the review:

Kogut’s primary interest is corporate governance and, secondarily, its role in economic development. Earlier work by economists had ASQ_v60n2_Jun2014_cover.inddsuggested that the primary route to development was a system of free and open markets, underpinned by an active capital market, strong legal protections of shareholder rights, and effective monitoring of management. Although liberalization and privatization occurred worldwide over the past four decades, Kogut argues that nations responded to these forces in very different ways. The outcomes they experienced, however, at least in terms of their ownership and director networks, were often very similar. In other cases, virtually identical levels of liberalization and privatization led to very different outcomes. Kogut’s goal in the book is to account for this convergence and divergence. To do this, he employs two approaches. The first, which he calls “comparing the comparative statics,” involves examining groups of countries that experienced a similar “structural break,” or what is usually termed an exogenous shock. The second, which he refers to as “Can you grow it?” (a phrase from the field of complex systems), involves the examination of network change through simulations, in particular the “rewiring” of the connections among units.

Kogut lays out these arguments in an extensive, wide-ranging introductory essay that is simultaneously an exegesis on organizational, economic, and sociological theory (with a dose of philosophy of science), punctuated with a didactic essay on social network analysis. This chapter, running 50 pages of densely packed text, is by itself worth the price of the book.

You can read the rest of the review from Administrative Science Quarterly by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research and reviews from Administrative Science Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

This entry was posted in Book Review, Corporate Governance, Cultural Research, Economics and tagged , , , , by Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, Management INK. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, Management INK

Founded in 1965, SAGE is the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. Known for our commitment to quality and innovation, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students across a broad range of subject areas. With over 900 employees globally from principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, and Washington DC, our publishing programme includes more than 560 journals and over 800 books, reference works and databases a year in business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. Believing passionately that engaged scholarship lies at the heart of any healthy society and that education is intrinsically valuable, SAGE aims to be the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. This means playing a creative role in society by disseminating teaching and research on a global scale, the cornerstones of which are good, long-term relationships, a focus on our markets, and an ability to combine quality and innovation. Leading authors, editors and societies should feel that SAGE is their natural home: we believe in meeting the range of their needs, and in publishing the best of their work. We are a growing company, and our financial success comes from thinking creatively about our markets and actively responding to the needs of our customers.

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