How Do Leadership Perceptions Affect Leader-Follower Exchange Quality?

JLOS_72ppiRGB_powerpoint[We’re pleased to welcome Patrick T. Coyle, who collaborated with Roseanne Foti on the article “If You’re Not With Me You’re . . . ? Examining Prototypes and Cooperation in Leader–Follower Relationships” from Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies.]

I was inspired to study perceptions of leaders and followers in leader-follower relationships because of a wide variety of experience I’ve had in both roles. The findings of this study were somewhat surprising, as we found perceptions of leadership matter to both leaders and followers when evaluating the quality of exchanges within the relationship. For this line of research, the next step is to test this process in a field setting and incorporate other process models involving perceptions of leaders and followers in dyadic relationships. I see this as a productive line of research that will help explain the importance of cognitive processes in the leadership process.

The abstract:

This study investigated how congruence between dyadic partners’ leader and follower prototypes affects leader–member exchange (LMX) quality. Specifically, we examined cooperation as a process variable in the dyadic relationship. Participants in a laboratory setting completed a group task followed by dyadic task in the context of a leader–follower relationship. Observed cooperation mediated the relationship between congruence on leader prototypes and leader assessed LMX quality, and the relationship between congruence on leader prototypes and LMX agreement. As congruence on leader prototypes decreased, leaders were less likely to be cooperative in an exchange relationship. As congruence on follower prototypes decreased, there was a greater chance leaders would cooperate but followers would defect.

Click here to read “If You’re Not With Me You’re . . . ? Examining Prototypes and Cooperation in Leader–Follower Relationships” from Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies. Want to know about all the latest research like this from Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

picture-139Patrick T. Coyle is a doctoral candidate in Industiral and Organizational psychology at Virginia Tech. His research interests within leadership focus on on leader-follower relationships, implicit leadership and followership, and the role of followers in the leadership process.

picture-158Roseanne J. Foti is an Associate Professor of Industrial and Organizational Psychology at Virginia Tech. Her research focuses on implicit leadership, the process of leadership emergence and shared leadership, and person approaches to the study of behavior.

This entry was posted in Employee Satisfaction, Employees, employers, Groups, Leadership, Organizational Behavior, Organizational Studies, Relationships, Teams and tagged , , by Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, SAGE Publishing. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, SAGE Publishing

Founded in 1965, SAGE is the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. Known for our commitment to quality and innovation, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students across a broad range of subject areas. With over 1500 employees globally from principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC, and Melburne, our publishing program includes more than 1000 journals and over 900 books, reference works and databases a year in business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. Believing passionately that engaged scholarship lies at the heart of any healthy society and that education is intrinsically valuable, SAGE aims to be the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. This means playing a creative role in society by disseminating teaching and research on a global scale, the cornerstones of which are good, long-term relationships, a focus on our markets, and an ability to combine quality and innovation. Leading authors, editors and societies should feel that SAGE is their natural home: we believe in meeting the range of their needs, and in publishing the best of their work. We are a growing company, and our financial success comes from thinking creatively about our markets and actively responding to the needs of our customers.

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