Book Review: Plastic Money: Constructing Markets for Credit Cards in Eight Postcommunist Countries

by

thHave some time to read before the new semester starts?

Akos Rona-Tas, Alya Guseva : Plastic Money: Constructing Markets for Credit Cards in Eight Postcommunist Countries. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014. 318 pp. $45.00, cloth.

Read the review by Christopher Yenkey from the University of Chicago, available now in the OnlineFirst section of Administrative Science Quarterly.

From the review:

This fascinating study of the creation of credit card markets in eight European and Asian ASQ_v59n4_Dec2014_cover.inddpostcommunist countries is the latest and most expansive work on the subject by Rona-Tas and Guseva. These authors have been studying the institutional underpinnings of fledgling credit card markets in the Eastern Bloc for almost as long as these countries have been struggling to transition away from regimes of central planning, and their knowledge of card markets in particular and market transition in general is extensive. Plastic Money follows Guseva’s 2008 Russia-focused manuscript, Into the Red, by expanding the empirical scope of the research to a comparison of Russia, Ukraine, Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, and for the first time two Asian countries, Vietnam and China. The expanded empirical breadth of the book is matched with a new set of substantive questions about how each country overcame a common set of frictions impeding the development of card markets and how variation in local solutions demonstrates the limits of the globalization-as-homogenization perspective.

You can read the rest of the review from Administrative Science Quarterly by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest research and reviews from Administrative Science Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: