Is OD Dead?

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As part of the celebration of 50 years of The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Philip H. Mirvis looks back at The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science’s role in the development of the applied behavioral sciences and organization development (OD) in his article “JABS at 50: Applied Behavioral Science and Something More?”

The abstract:

A sampling of fifty years of articles published in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences highlights the integration of theory and practice from JABS’ founding years to the mid-1980s, then a steady shift toward scholarship on “change knowing” and away from “change doing”. This review anchors JABS in JABS_v50_72ppiRGB_powerpointthe development of the applied behavioral sciences and organization development (OD) and reports on the author’s personal experiences as a budding practical scholar. JABS turn away from application is traced to the normalization of scientific progress in this arena and routinization of practice as change management. The paper then takes up the long-debated question “Is OD dead?” and considers how “something more”—concepts extending beyond conventional behavioral science—has led to revolutionary advances in the practice of change these past two decades. It then highlights how ideas from the arts, spirituality, and chaos-and-complexity sciences have added new dimensions to scholarly practice for the field (and for me) and today beckon sharper theorizing. JABS has of late stretched into these subjects but could do more so. The paper concludes with a call for more artsy, spiritual, and/or off-the-wall publications in JABS’ next fifty years.

Click here to read the rest of “JABS at 50: Applied Behavioral Science and Something More?” from The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science. Want to keep up-to-date on all the latest news and research from The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

This entry was posted in Change, Creativity and Innovation, Organizational Development, Organizational Research, Organizational Studies, Research and Publishing, Scholarship and tagged , , , , by Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, SAGE Publishing. Bookmark the permalink.

About Cynthia Nalevanko, Editor, SAGE Publishing

Founded in 1965, SAGE is the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. Known for our commitment to quality and innovation, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students across a broad range of subject areas. With over 1500 employees globally from principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC, and Melburne, our publishing program includes more than 1000 journals and over 900 books, reference works and databases a year in business, humanities, social sciences, science, technology and medicine. Believing passionately that engaged scholarship lies at the heart of any healthy society and that education is intrinsically valuable, SAGE aims to be the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher. This means playing a creative role in society by disseminating teaching and research on a global scale, the cornerstones of which are good, long-term relationships, a focus on our markets, and an ability to combine quality and innovation. Leading authors, editors and societies should feel that SAGE is their natural home: we believe in meeting the range of their needs, and in publishing the best of their work. We are a growing company, and our financial success comes from thinking creatively about our markets and actively responding to the needs of our customers.

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