Author Archive

What is Performance Adaptation?

April 24, 2014

businessman-in-the-office-2-1287062-mThe workplace has changed over the last few decades. Workers are now required to continuously accommodate new and challenging situations as they arise. Researchers have been intrigued by this transformation and have written about it from various angles. But what is the big picture of performance adaptation? Authors Samantha K. Baard, Tara A. Rench, and Steve W. J. Kozlowski reviewed existing research to create a conceptual taxonomy of performance adaptation in their paper, “Performance Adaptation: A Theoretical Integration and Review” from Journal of Management.

The abstract:

Stability and routine are two words that can rarely be used to describe the present-dayjom cover workplace. Instead, individuals, teams, and organizations are required to respond to dynamic and changing situations. As a result, researchers have become increasingly interested in understanding performance adaptation, evident in the substantial growth in research over the past two decades. However, what researchers mean when they study adaptation is often broad, vague, and inconsistent—especially at the organizational level—such that drawing solid conclusions is challenging. To move toward integration, we focused the review on individual and team performance adaptation, where the mechanisms of adaptation can be observed. We developed a conceptual taxonomy to map extant research, provide insights for synthesis, and identify directions for future theory building and research. Specifically, we identify four theoretical approaches: (a) a performance construct, (b) an individual difference construct, (c) a change in performance, and (d) a process. Each perspective is reviewed, identifying definitions and key assumptions; discussing conceptual foundations and empirical findings; and highlighting discrepancies, similarities, and opportunities for synthesis. The discussion recommends useful lines of inquiry for future research. Moreover, to promote individual-, team-, and organizational-level integration, we propose a multilevel conceptual architecture specifying the what (nature), where (levels), and how (mechanisms) of adaptation to better define the nature of the phenomenon. In combination, the taxonomy, review content, and conceptual architecture are designed to enhance conceptual clarity and consistency, encourage integration, and advance theory and research on adaptation as a pervasive phenomenon in organizational science.

Click here to read “Performance Adaptation: A Theoretical Integration and Review” from Journal of Management. Make sure to click here to sign up for e-alerts and stay up to date on all the latest from Journal of Management!

Do You Know Where Your Food Comes From?

April 23, 2014
(CC BY Robert Couse-Baker)

(CC BY Robert Couse-Baker)

At the end of March, meat producers in North America, including Tyson Foods Inc. and Hormel Foods Corp., lost an appeal to suspend new country-of-origin labeling laws, claiming it violated their first amendment rights. The law has been a hot topic of debate, with some claiming that labeling is a food safety tool and others that it’s merely a consumer information program. So how much is actually known about the practice of Country-of-origin labeling? An article entitled “Twenty Years of Country-of-Origin Food Labeling Research: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Food Marketing Systems” researched this topic, available now from the Journal of Macromarketing.

The abstract:

Recent legislation by the United States and European Union governments now mandates the provision ofJMMK_new C1 template.indd country-of-origin (COO) information at the point of purchase for a variety of meats, fruits, vegetables, and other assorted food products. To better understand the significance of these regulatory changes, two decades of existing COO food labeling research are synthesized, reviewed, and discussed. The implications for two primary sets of actors within aggregate marketing systems, consumers and practitioners, are then discussed from a macromarketing perspective. Based on the reviewed literature, the authors conclude that little generalizable knowledge about COO food labeling effects exists, and further identify a lack of sufficient theoretical application and development as a primary reason. Consequently, the exact impact of mandatory (and voluntary) COO labeling initiatives for consumers and practitioners still remains unclear and highly debatable. Thus, as these initiatives continue to make country-of-origin labeling more commonplace around the world, it is crucial that additional theory-driven research be conducted, especially from a macromarketing perspective, to foster more generalizable knowledge about the complex role of COO information in aggregate food marketing systems.

Read “Twenty Years of Country-of-Origin Food Labeling Research: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Food Marketing Systems” from Journal of Macromarketing for free by clicking here. Click here to sign up for e-alerts and stay up to date on all the latest from Journal of Macromarketing.

Usability testing at SAGE

April 22, 2014

Would you like to help shape the features and functionality of SAGE’s online products? We are conducting monthly usability businessman-with-the-notebook-3-1362248-mtesting and would love for you to get involved! If you are a student, researcher, faculty member or librarian, sign up for one of our sessions by filling out our online registration form.

What it is:
You will test 2-3 products using either a live site or a set of wireframes. Wireframes are the blueprints for a website, and although some of them have interactivity built in such as links and working menus, many of them do not. We use them to test our approach and are looking to test the site’s ability to help you complete your tasks.

When it happens:
We are running testing from April 21-25, and ongoing testing will occur every 3rd week of the month.

Where it happens:
You can visit us at one of our four testing locations in Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington, DC, or London, UK. If you are not in one of these locations, we may set up remote testing.

How to get involved:
Sign up!

Still have questions? Contact Alicia Warren.

Snowden and … Sophocles? Whistleblowing in Antigone

April 21, 2014

483px-Antigoneleigh

Frederic Leighton [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

While figures like Edward Snowden and Julian Assange have been in the public eye in recent years, whistleblowers are not a new concept. Qui tam was a common law practice that began in thirteen century England that allowed an individual to bring charges against an entity who violated the law and receive compensation from the penalties charged against the guilty party, a system Continental Congress adopted before the Revolutionary War had even ended. Author Alessia Contu looks even further back in history for a fuller portrait of whistleblowers in her article “Rationality and Relationality in the Process of Whistleblowing: Recasting Whistleblowing Through Readings of Antigone” from Journal of Management Inquiry.

The abstract:

JMI_72ppiRGB_powerpointReporting wrongdoing is seen as desirable to fight illegal practices, but whistleblowers often suffer retaliations and are in need of protection. Overall, whistleblowers engender strong reactions and are cast either as saints or rats. I consider why whistleblowers are seen as unsettling and ambivalent figures by exploring the analogy between Antigone, the Sophoclean heroine, and whistleblowers. These reflections reconfigure the rationality and relationality of the process of whistleblowing. The rationality of the whistleblower is singular and not easily subsumed into universalizing norms which explains some of the limits reached by the empiricist pro-social research agenda. The relationality of the process of whistleblowing indicates that the reactions of those who hear the whistle are as important. This open up to an appreciation of the ethical and political valence of the process of whistleblowing and highlights a number of counter-intuitive and interesting issues in its synchronic and diachronic dimension.

Read “Rationality and Relationality in the Process of Whistleblowing: Recasting Whistleblowing Through Readings of Antigone” from Journal of Management Inquiry for free by clicking here. Want to keep up on all the latest from Journal of Management Inquiry? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

Out of Whack: On the Strength of Weak Ties

April 19, 2014

[We're pleased to reproduce Journal of Management Inquiry's "Out of Whack" by Charles M. Vance.]

OfWRead “Out of Whack” for free from Journal of Management Inquiry by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest from Journal of Management Inquiry? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

How Satisfied Are Team Members Individually?

April 18, 2014

[Editor's Note: We are pleased to welcome Jose M. de la Torre-Ruiz who collaborated with Vera Ferron-Vilchez and Natalia Ortiz-e-Mandojana on their article "Team Decision Making and Individual Satisfaction with the Team" in the April Issue of Small Group Research.]

SGR_72ppiRGB_powerpointThe main reason justifying this work was the necessity of analyzing in depth individuals’ affective reactions toward being involved in team-decision making processes. Although team decisions have shown some advantages compared with decisions made by only one person, team decision-making process can be complex and generate some negative reactions by part of team members. For this reason in this paper we paid attention to some specific factors that may influence the satisfaction of individuals with the team. We specifically focus on some personality traits (collectivism orientation and self-efficacy for teamwork), on the individuals’ perception of team decision-making process (specifically perception of team debate and decision comprehensiveness), and on the final decision of the team.

Our work highlights the necessity of considering that team members’ satisfaction with the team may depend on factors developed at different temporal moments in the team decision-making process. These results have important implications to the extent that the handling of these factors can be different.

The fact that team debate has a negative influence on team members’ satisfaction but that the decision comprehensiveness has a positive influence is an especially interesting result. This implies that although team members are satisfied when different opinions are assessed before making the decision, they prefer to avoid possible conflicts and heated debates that can be derived from this. Thus, our result highlight the necessity of studying in depth the decision-making process and try to understand when team members can be more or less comfortable in the team.

Read “Team Decision Making and Individual Satisfaction with the Team” for free from Small Group Research by clicking here. Make sure to click here to sign up for e-alerts and read about all the latest from Small Group Research.

José M. de la Torre-Ruiz is an assistant professor in the business and management department at University of Granada, Spain, where he received his PhD. His primary research interests are human resource management and team management.
8046194838_6240affd16_mVera Ferrón-Vílchez is an assistant professor in the business and management department at University of Granada, Spain, where she received her PhD in management. Her current research focuses on advanced environmental strategies, human resources management, and the achievement of cost leadership strategy.
                                                                                                                                                                                  Natalia Ortiz foto_
Natalia Ortiz-de-Mandojana is an assistant professor of organization and management at the University of Islas Baleares, Spain. She received her PhD from University of Granada. Her research focuses on environmental management and corporate governance.

The Human Right to Clean Water VS Property Rights

April 17, 2014

drinking-966608-mIn July of 2010, the United nations identified clean water as a human right. However, less than one percent of the fresh water on earth is accessible for human use and global population is estimated to reach eight billion by 2025. But not all nations have and can maintain clean water systems due to the economic burden. Could the answer to this problem lie not in human rights, but property rights? Jeremy J. Schmidt and Kyle R. Mitchell discuss the political and ethical considerations of the rights to clean water in their article “Property and the Right to Water: Toward a Non-Liberal Commons” from Review of Radical Political Economics.

The abstract:

This paper examines the turn to considerations of property in arguments regarding the commons and the humanRRPE_v46_72ppiRGB_powerpoint right to water. It identifies commitments to liberalism in political economy approaches to property and human rights and develops a matrix for identifying non-liberal conceptions of the commons. The latter holds potential for an agonistic politics in which human rights are compatible with ecological sensibilities regarding the dynamics of conflict and cooperation in complex systems.
Read “Property and the Right to Water: Toward a Non-Liberal Commons” from Review of Radical Political Economics.
Click here to sign up for e-alerts and get all the latest from Review of Radical Political Economics.

Can Encouragement from Parents Impact Children’s Interests in Math?

April 15, 2014

top-education-1-1029825-mIn 2009, President Obama launched the “Educate to Innovate” campaign, which called for a nationwide push to motivate students to reach a higher level of success in science, technology, engineering and math (i.e. “STEM”). Since then various educational programs – including even segments on Sesame Street – have been launched across the country in hopes of inspiring a love of STEM subjects in children. But how can encouragement from parents play a part in this movement? Marsha Ing investigated this idea in her article “Can Parents Influence Children’s Mathematics Achievement and Persistence in STEM Careers?” available now from the latest issue of the Journal of Career Development.

The abstract:

This study explores the relationship between parental motivational practices, Children’s mathematicsJCD_72ppiRGB_powerpoint achievement trajectories, and persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. Nationally representative longitudinal survey data were analyzed using latent growth curve analysis. Findings indicate that parents’ motivational practices influence their children’s mathematics achievement in terms of where the Children start in the 7th grade and how much mathematics achievement grows or changes through the 12th grade. Findings also indicate a positive relationship between mathematics-specific, intrinsically focused parental motivational practices and growth in mathematics achievement and persistence in STEM careers. These findings provide specific information about how different types of parental motivational practices influence long-term mathematics achievement and persistence in STEM careers.
Read “Can Parents Influence Children’s Mathematics Achievement and Persistence in STEM Careers?” from Journal of Career Development for free by clicking here. Want to get all the latest news from Journal of Career Development? Click here to sign up for e-alerts.

Could Smartphones Become a Teaching Tool?

April 14, 2014

hand-holding-mobile-smart-phone-1417191-mA quick internet search of “smartphone etiquette in class” will give you a fairly straightforward answer: don’t use your phone. But what if instructors could use smartphone technology to their advantage instead? A new article published in Business and Professional Communication Quarterly entitled “Multitasking With Smartphones in the College Classroom” examines the idea of using smartphones to help enhance students’ learning rather than interfere with it.

The abstract:

Although the concept of multitasking itself is under debate, smartphones do enable users to divert attention fromBPCQ.indd the task at hand to nongermane matters. As smartphone use becomes pervasive, extending into our classrooms, educators are concerned that they are becoming a major distraction. Does multitasking with smartphones impede learning? Can they be used to enhance learning instead? This article reviews current literature, provides suggestions for further investigation, and proposes an approach to incorporate smartphone multitasking in the classroom to enhance learning.
Click here to read “Multitasking With Smartphones in the College Classroom” for free from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly. Want to be the first to know about all the latest from Business and Professional Communication Quarterly? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!

 

Out of Whack: AQ, PQ, Miscue?

April 12, 2014

[We're pleased to reproduce Journal of Management Inquiry's "Out of Whack" by Charles M. Vance.]

OOW 114Read “Out of Whack” for free from the January 2014 issue of Journal of Management Inquiry by clicking here. Want to know about all the latest from Journal of Management Inquiry? Click here to sign up for e-alerts!


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